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Robert L Clarke

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BUSINESS
July 3, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke is fast becoming the most visible symbol of the growing political strains between Congress and the White House over the banking crisis. After six months of holding up Clarke's renomination as the nation's chief banking regulator, Sen. Donald W. Riegle Jr. (D-Mich.), chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, has finally agreed in principle to start formal consideration of the appointment.
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BUSINESS
November 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clarke to Stay Until Successor Is Named: Robert L. Clarke said he will stay on as comptroller of the currency for now, even though his nomination to a second term was rejected by the Senate Banking Committee. "I believe it is essential that the office . . . continue to have leadership during this critical period for banks," he said. The comptroller regulates federally chartered banks, including most of the nation's largest institutions.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bush Administration attorneys cleared Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke of allegations of conflict of interest Tuesday after an investigation of his extensive financial investments, which he has continued to actively manage despite his role as one of the nation's chief banking regulators. In a detailed report on Clarke's complex personal holdings, the general counsel of the Treasury Department found that Clarke, a millionaire, did not violate government ethics rules.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Banking Committee, split by a bitter debate, voted Wednesday to reject the nomination of Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke for a second term, offering a partisan rebuff to the Bush Administration's economic policies.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | From Reuters
Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke, battling to keep his job amid charges that his lax leadership contributed to the wave of bank failures, said Monday that he will hire 300 more bank examiners. Clarke said the 15% increase in examiners over two years would allow his office to scrutinize the books of even the smallest banks more frequently, marking a shift from the agency's recent policy. Clarke announced his hiring plans in a speech at the Consumer Bankers Assn.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert L. Clarke is a man in the middle. As the Senate Banking Committee opens hearings today on his appointment to a second five-year term as comptroller of the currency, the 49-year-old banking regulator finds himself being fingered by opposing camps as the chief culprit of the current crisis in banking.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1990 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is arguably the most watched person in banking today. He may be the most feared. And he probably is the funniest at a time when there are many long faces. As the nation's chief regulator of national banks, Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke and his staff have been accused of launching SWAT-like examinations to unearth problem real estate loans.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clarke to Stay Until Successor Is Named: Robert L. Clarke said he will stay on as comptroller of the currency for now, even though his nomination to a second term was rejected by the Senate Banking Committee. "I believe it is essential that the office . . . continue to have leadership during this critical period for banks," he said. The comptroller regulates federally chartered banks, including most of the nation's largest institutions.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke has agreed to put his holdings in a blind trust and take other steps to comply with conflict-of-interest laws, the federal Office of Government Ethics said. Ethics office director Stephen D. Potts cleared Clarke of any intentional violations after an examination of Clarke's records. The comptroller received inaccurate advice and an incomplete review of his financial disclosure statements by the Treasury Department's ethics officials, Potts said.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comptroller of the Currency Robert Clarke, responding to fears from the White House about a worsening credit crunch, said Thursday that he will bypass the normal supervisory process to consider complaints from bankers who say that regulators are being too tough in reviewing the safety of loans.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1991 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate Banking Committee Chairman Donald Riegle (D-Mich.) on Thursday accused Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke of being a weak regulator and indicated that he will insist on a further lengthy delay in the vote on Clarke's renomination. "You're the one out there with a different standard," offering excessively easy rules for the valuation of real estate designed to help troubled Texas and West Coast banks, Riegle told Clarke.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert L. Clarke is a man in the middle. As the Senate Banking Committee opens hearings today on his appointment to a second five-year term as comptroller of the currency, the 49-year-old banking regulator finds himself being fingered by opposing camps as the chief culprit of the current crisis in banking.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | From Reuters
Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke, battling to keep his job amid charges that his lax leadership contributed to the wave of bank failures, said Monday that he will hire 300 more bank examiners. Clarke said the 15% increase in examiners over two years would allow his office to scrutinize the books of even the smallest banks more frequently, marking a shift from the agency's recent policy. Clarke announced his hiring plans in a speech at the Consumer Bankers Assn.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke has agreed to put his holdings in a blind trust and take other steps to comply with conflict-of-interest laws, the federal Office of Government Ethics said. Ethics office director Stephen D. Potts cleared Clarke of any intentional violations after an examination of Clarke's records. The comptroller received inaccurate advice and an incomplete review of his financial disclosure statements by the Treasury Department's ethics officials, Potts said.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1991 | From Reuters
Foot-dragging by the comptroller of the currency in overseeing explosive and risky growth at the Bank of New England, the third-largest bank failure, may put the regulator's bid for a second term in jeopardy, senators warned Thursday. "The comptroller of the currency is in real trouble right now, and whether he can survive, I don't know," said Sen. Richard Shelby (D-Ala.).
BUSINESS
May 11, 1991 | From Reuters
U.S. Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke, who has come under scrutiny for actively trading securities while serving as a bank regulator, said Friday that he would place his personal investments in a blind trust. "I am taking these actions today to lay to rest questions about my financial affairs so that I can devote my full attention to the difficult bank regulatory decisions that lie ahead," he said.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke was reappointed Tuesday by President Bush as the overseer of federally chartered banks, despite last-minute opposition from White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu. The economic slump in New England, where banks are cutting back drastically on their lending activity, prompted an effort by Sununu to oppose Clarke, according to government sources.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1991 | BETH HAWKINS and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
L. William Seidman's replacement won't be wearing his two hats, as a bank regulator at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and as a savings and loan asset salesman at the Resolution Trust Corp., Congressional experts and financial analysts agreed Tuesday. Congressional irritation with the Resolution Trust Corp., often deflected by Seidman, is coming into full bloom.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comptroller of the Currency Robert L. Clarke is fast becoming the most visible symbol of the growing political strains between Congress and the White House over the banking crisis. After six months of holding up Clarke's renomination as the nation's chief banking regulator, Sen. Donald W. Riegle Jr. (D-Mich.), chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, has finally agreed in principle to start formal consideration of the appointment.
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