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Robert L Crandall

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BUSINESS
October 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
The price of AMR Corp. stock rose marginally Thursday amid reports of possible interest by Ft. Worth billionaire Robert Bass in buying the parent of American Airlines. Meanwhile, another report said AMR's chairman held talks with the company's pilots union about a possible buyout. The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that aides to Bass had indicated the secretive investor might be willing to help AMR fend off New York developer Donald J. Trump's $7-billion offer for the Ft.
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BUSINESS
December 3, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As fare wars and huge losses engulfed the U.S. airline industry in mid-1992, a Senate subcommittee met to probe allegations that American Airlines was using predatory pricing to shoot down weaker carriers. Their witness that day: Robert L. Crandall, American's combative chairman. As usual, Crandall took the offensive.
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BUSINESS
January 21, 1991
Here's one publication a flight attendant won't offer you: Capt. Fury's Advice Column. Written by a pilot "who is Chairman (Robert L.) Crandall's worst nightmare come true," the satirical underground newsletter takes aim at the American Airlines executives who are leading the stormy contract talks with pilots.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As a consequence of Monday's dramatic end to the strike at American Airlines, there's a good chance that Chairman Robert Crandall will be taking early retirement within the next year, pushed out by institutional investors who find his miscalculations counterproductive and his confrontational style out of date. That's only an opinion based on Wall Street scuttlebutt, but the combative chief executive of AMR Corp.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1985 | ROBERT E. DALLOS
Robert L. Crandall, president and chief operating officer of AMR Corp., the parent of American Airlines Inc., on Wednesday was elected chairman and chief executive of both companies. He succeeds Albert V. Casey, who had announced at the company's annual meeting last May that he would retire when he reaches age 65 at the end of February.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1986 | TONY ROBINSON, Times Staff Writer
American Airlines and Pan American World Airways will combine their frequent flyer programs and Pan Am will join American's Sabre computerized reservations system, the chairmen of the two carriers announced Monday. The consolidation of American's AAdvantage and Pan Am's WorldPass frequent flyer programs on June 1 will allow club members of either airline to accrue and redeem miles on the other carrier. The programs, however, will retain their individual marketing identities.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1987 | LILY ENG, Times Staff Writer
The job security of some of AirCal's 3,400 employees remained uncertain Monday after the Transportation Department gave final approval to American Airline's $225-million acquisition of the Newport Beach-based regional air carrier. Since last November, when American announced its plans to purchase AirCal, spokesmen for both airlines have been reluctant to field questions about layoffs, transfers and seniority.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
American Airlines, which set the industry's rapid expansion pace during the 1980s, told shareholders Wednesday that it might have to pull out of money-losing markets as it grapples with financial troubles in the '90s. At the annual meeting of AMR Corp., the airline's parent, Chairman Robert L. Crandall refused to say specifically where American might scale back its operations. But he pointed to short-haul markets where American has trouble competing with low-cost rival Southwest Airlines.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As fare wars and huge losses engulfed the U.S. airline industry in mid-1992, a Senate subcommittee met to probe allegations that American Airlines was using predatory pricing to shoot down weaker carriers. Their witness that day: Robert L. Crandall, American's combative chairman. As usual, Crandall took the offensive.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Robert L. Crandall, the feisty, chain-smoking chairman of American Airlines, is not likely to put the company up for sale without a fight, those familiar with American said Thursday. Real estate magnate Donald J. Trump on Thursday offered $120 a share, or more than $7 billion, for American, confirming rumors that he was interested in the nation's largest airline. American responded that it would look at Trump's offer "in due course."
NEWS
November 22, 1993 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remaining defiant in the face of a crippling and costly flight attendants' strike, American Airlines Chairman Robert L. Crandall on Sunday rebuffed a union proposal for emergency federal mediation and threatened to eliminate the jobs of about 4,000 attendants. On a day of heightening rhetoric, Crandall offered little relief for American's beleaguered passengers, saying only about 40% of the carrier's flights would transport customers over the busy Thanksgiving holiday.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Crandall Defends Fare Strategy: American Airlines Chairman Robert Crandall testified that his carrier launched budget fares last summer in an attempt to improve business, not destroy weaker competitors. "The value plan was an effort to increase our profits, increase our revenues, decrease our costs. We were trying to implement a solution to a business problem," Crandall said.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
American Airlines, which set the industry's rapid expansion pace during the 1980s, told shareholders Wednesday that it might have to pull out of money-losing markets as it grapples with financial troubles in the '90s. At the annual meeting of AMR Corp., the airline's parent, Chairman Robert L. Crandall refused to say specifically where American might scale back its operations. But he pointed to short-haul markets where American has trouble competing with low-cost rival Southwest Airlines.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
American Airlines is cutting fares to drive weaker competitors out of business and will raise prices if it succeeds, the chairman of financially troubled TWA said Sunday. "You believe in the tooth fairy if you believe these fares aren't going to go back up," TWA's Carl Icahn said on ABC's "This Week with David Brinkley."
BUSINESS
January 21, 1991
Here's one publication a flight attendant won't offer you: Capt. Fury's Advice Column. Written by a pilot "who is Chairman (Robert L.) Crandall's worst nightmare come true," the satirical underground newsletter takes aim at the American Airlines executives who are leading the stormy contract talks with pilots.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
The price of AMR Corp. stock rose marginally Thursday amid reports of possible interest by Ft. Worth billionaire Robert Bass in buying the parent of American Airlines. Meanwhile, another report said AMR's chairman held talks with the company's pilots union about a possible buyout. The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that aides to Bass had indicated the secretive investor might be willing to help AMR fend off New York developer Donald J. Trump's $7-billion offer for the Ft.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Whether or not billionaire Donald J. Trump succeeds in taking over the parent of American Airlines, it seems clear that the company will be forced into major changes. With his $120-a-share offer for AMR Corp. on Thursday, Trump has put the airline company into play and has whetted the shareholders' appetite for profits. They must be appeased in some fashion, industry analysts said Friday.
NEWS
November 22, 1993 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remaining defiant in the face of a crippling and costly flight attendants' strike, American Airlines Chairman Robert L. Crandall on Sunday rebuffed a union proposal for emergency federal mediation and threatened to eliminate the jobs of about 4,000 attendants. On a day of heightening rhetoric, Crandall offered little relief for American's beleaguered passengers, saying only about 40% of the carrier's flights would transport customers over the busy Thanksgiving holiday.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Whether or not billionaire Donald J. Trump succeeds in taking over the parent of American Airlines, it seems clear that the company will be forced into major changes. With his $120-a-share offer for AMR Corp. on Thursday, Trump has put the airline company into play and has whetted the shareholders' appetite for profits. They must be appeased in some fashion, industry analysts said Friday.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Robert L. Crandall, the feisty, chain-smoking chairman of American Airlines, is not likely to put the company up for sale without a fight, those familiar with American said Thursday. Real estate magnate Donald J. Trump on Thursday offered $120 a share, or more than $7 billion, for American, confirming rumors that he was interested in the nation's largest airline. American responded that it would look at Trump's offer "in due course."
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