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NEWS
February 17, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two top mariners on the ill-fated tanker American Trader that spilled 394,000 gallons of oil off Orange County remained on the job this week. John E. Keon, the mooring master on board during the accident, said he worked this week as a pilot on vessels unloading oil at an offshore mooring in Louisiana. As a mooring master, Keon hires out his services to a variety of ships, offering guidance and knowledge of local waters during maneuvers to berth at offshore moorings.
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NEWS
February 17, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two top mariners on the ill-fated tanker American Trader that spilled 394,000 gallons of oil off Orange County remained on the job this week. John E. Keon, the mooring master on board during the accident, said he worked this week as a pilot on vessels unloading oil at an offshore mooring in Louisiana. As a mooring master, Keon hires out his services to a variety of ships, offering guidance and knowledge of local waters during maneuvers to berth at offshore moorings.
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NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
In the wake of the oil spill off Huntington Beach, the commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard said this morning that regular depth surveys probably are going to be required in the future at all offshore tanker terminals to ensure their safety. At a press conference in Long Beach, Adm. Paul A. Yost called the fact that soundings have never been required at tanker moorings "an oversight, a goof."
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | RICHARD BEENE
The highest fine that can be levied against the firm determined to be responsible for the rupture of an oil tanker off the California coast is $250,000, officials said Friday. Cmdr. Scott Porter, a Coast Guard spokesman in Long Beach, said the Environmental Protection Agency would impose the fine only if the Coast Guard's maximum penalty--$5,000--is considered inadequate, "taking into account the magnitude of the spill." "I think we have to assume that ($5,000) isn't much for a major company. .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard said Tuesday that the government made "a goof" by failing to require depth soundings at pipeline moorings such as the one off Huntington Beach where an oil tanker spilled 394,000 gallons of crude. "I think in the future, the Coast Guard will take a very hard look at requiring . . . a more frequent sounding and determination of the depth," Adm. Paul A. Yost said during a visit to Coast Guard district headquarters at the Port of Long Beach.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | JIM NEWTON and STEVEN R. CHURM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Strong winds overnight produced the worst damage yet to Orange County beaches, driving heavy bands of thick crude oil that spilled offshore last week onto the sands of Huntington and Bolsa Chica state beaches. Coast Guard officials monitoring the oil slick said bands 20 to 30 feet wide and 2 inches thick washed ashore at Bolsa Chica State Beach early today.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John Keon, the mooring master who supervised the ill-fated berthing of the American Trader off Huntington Beach, said Friday night that he feels badly about the oil spill but that he is not to blame. "Our lives are tied to the sea," said Keon, 41, in his first interview since the accident. "We care just as much about the birds and the fish and everything else, the pollution, as anybody. I see those people on the beach and I hope they know that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1990 | STEVEN R. CHURM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Lands Commission chairman warned Wednesday that officials should focus on preventing future oil spills rather than celebrating the "near-heroic cleanup" of 394,000 gallons of crude that spewed last month from the wounded tanker American Trader.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owners of the 800-foot-long tanker American Trader, which has spewed hundreds of thousands of gallons of crude oil into the ocean off Huntington Beach, said Thursday that the ship's bottom probably was punctured by its own anchor as the ship maneuvered into an offshore mooring to unload its cargo. The same tanker has been involved in four other mishaps, two in the last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1990 | STEVEN R. CHURM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Lands Commission chairman warned Wednesday that officials should focus on preventing future oil spills rather than celebrating the "near-heroic cleanup" of 394,000 gallons of crude that spewed last month from the wounded tanker American Trader.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying he saw no reason to question nautical charts or do his own depth readings, the pilot of the American Trader has told state lawyers that he expected no problems the day the oil tanker punctured its hull on its own anchor, spilling 394,000 gallons of crude off Huntington Beach, attorneys for the State Lands Commission said. In a brief interview, Capt. John E. Keon declined to comment Monday on specifics of his statement to attorneys for the Lands Commission.
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