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Robert Langdon

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May 18, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Some years ago, I was on a book reviewing panel when someone in the audience asked what we, the panelists, thought of "The Bridges of Madison County," which was then a fixture on bestseller lists. We hemmed and hawed, tried to talk around the question, until our moderator acknowledged that, most likely, none of us had read the book. This led to a discussion of the difference between critics and readers. How, if the book was selling so widely, could we not have read it? What did that say about us?
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Sony Pictures is skipping over ”The Lost Symbol” and heading into an “Inferno,” announcing Tuesday that the 2013 Dan Brown novel will be its next Robert Langdon movie. The studio has hired writer David Koepp, who penned the 2009 hit “Angels & Demons” based on Brown's novel of the same name, and aims to release the movie in December 2015. Tom Hanks is attached to return in the Langdon role; no director has been announced. Released in May, the “Inferno” novel centers on Langdon and his partner Sienna, who are off on an adventure in Florence, Italy, sparked by a clue on a modified rendition of Botticelli's “Map of Hell.” The book, the fourth in the Langdon series, quickly became a bestseller upon its release.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2009 | Nick Owchar
The wait is over. "The Lost Symbol," the follow-up to Dan Brown's 2003 mega-seller, "The Da Vinci Code," is here -- and you don't have to be a Freemason to enjoy it (although it wouldn't hurt). Like "Angels and Demons," published in 2000, and "The Da Vinci Code," "The Lost Symbol" solves puzzles, analyzes paintings and reveals forgotten histories -- all so that Brown's tireless hero, Robert Langdon, can find a legendary Masonic treasure despite special ops squads that are dogging him and a bizarre killer who has kidnapped his dear friend and mentor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Some years ago, I was on a book reviewing panel when someone in the audience asked what we, the panelists, thought of "The Bridges of Madison County," which was then a fixture on bestseller lists. We hemmed and hawed, tried to talk around the question, until our moderator acknowledged that, most likely, none of us had read the book. This led to a discussion of the difference between critics and readers. How, if the book was selling so widely, could we not have read it? What did that say about us?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
With "The Da Vinci Code" author Dan Brown's news Tuesday morning that he would be releasing a new Robert Langdon adventure in May, we thought it wise to check in with the movie prospects for Brown's last Langdon tale, "The Lost Symbol," which resided on the New York Times hard-cover fiction bestseller list for 29 weeks and has 30 million copies in print worldwide. Sony's Columbia Pictures, which released the previous two films, "The DaVinci Code" and "Angels and Demons," owns the option to all of Brown's future projects involving Langdon, including "The Lost Symbol" and the upcoming "Inferno.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The cover design of Dan Brown's forthcoming novel, "Inferno," was revealed Wednesday. It pretty clearly resembles his mega-huge bestselling hit, "The Da Vinci Code," which introduced readers to Brown's hero,  renowned Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon. Both covers have gold text; both are in all caps. Both appear to have a tear in the cover paper, revealing something underneath. And that something is classic and recognizable: On "The Da Vinci Code," it's the Mona Lisa; on "Inferno," it's the dour-ish profile of Dante.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
Dan Brown's new book, "The Lost Symbol," will hit shelves Sept. 15, it was announced Monday by his publisher, Doubleday. Brown is the man behind the runaway bestsellers "The Da Vinci Code" and "Angels & Demons." With 81 million copies in print, "The Da Vinci Code" is the bestselling hardcover adult novel of all time. "The Lost Symbol" will again feature protagonist Robert Langdon and will continue Brown's historical-religious- conspiracy-thriller tradition. In a new twist, Brown has amped up the action -- the entire novel takes place in 12 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Dan Brown's new thriller "Inferno," starrring his tweedy hero Robert Langdon from "The Da Vinci Code," will be published May 14 in hardcover and as an e-book by Doubleday, the publisher announced Tuesday. In case you've forgotten "The Da Vinci Code" phenomenon, it spent more than a year -- 54 weeks -- topping the New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list after it was released in 2003. It has been translated into 51 languages and is considered the bestselling adult hardcover of all time with 81 million copies in print worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Happy publication day to Dan Brown, whose latest Robert Langdon thriller, " Inferno ," officially hits shelves Tuesday. Online, it's already declared its dominance: It's Amazon's No. 1 bestselling book -- thanks to preorders, it has been in the website's top 100 books for 119 days. Brown, of course, is the author of "The Da Vinci Code. " That novel's breathtaking pace, dynamic mystery and the protagonist, renowned symbologist Robert Langdon, surged to the top of bestseller lists when it was published in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Sony Pictures is skipping over ”The Lost Symbol” and heading into an “Inferno,” announcing Tuesday that the 2013 Dan Brown novel will be its next Robert Langdon movie. The studio has hired writer David Koepp, who penned the 2009 hit “Angels & Demons” based on Brown's novel of the same name, and aims to release the movie in December 2015. Tom Hanks is attached to return in the Langdon role; no director has been announced. Released in May, the “Inferno” novel centers on Langdon and his partner Sienna, who are off on an adventure in Florence, Italy, sparked by a clue on a modified rendition of Botticelli's “Map of Hell.” The book, the fourth in the Langdon series, quickly became a bestseller upon its release.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Happy publication day to Dan Brown, whose latest Robert Langdon thriller, " Inferno ," officially hits shelves Tuesday. Online, it's already declared its dominance: It's Amazon's No. 1 bestselling book -- thanks to preorders, it has been in the website's top 100 books for 119 days. Brown, of course, is the author of "The Da Vinci Code. " That novel's breathtaking pace, dynamic mystery and the protagonist, renowned symbologist Robert Langdon, surged to the top of bestseller lists when it was published in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | Jenny Hendrix
Doubleday has announced that it will be giving away free e-books of Dan Brown's international bestseller "The Da Vinci Code" this week.  The free digital download is offered in celebration of the novel's 10th anniversary (to readers only in the U.S. and Canada). "The Da Vinci Code" was originally published March 18, 2003 and quickly sold more than 81 million copies. The free download isn't exactly a conspiracy, but it is, clearly, part marketing: Besides the best-selling art-historical whodunit, the ebook will include the prologue and first chapter of Brown's forthcoming thriller "Inferno," also featuring renowned symbologist Robert Langdon, which will be published in May. The free e-book deal is a natural digital outgrowth of teasing a sequel by including a first chapter in the back pages of a paperback.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The cover design of Dan Brown's forthcoming novel, "Inferno," was revealed Wednesday. It pretty clearly resembles his mega-huge bestselling hit, "The Da Vinci Code," which introduced readers to Brown's hero,  renowned Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon. Both covers have gold text; both are in all caps. Both appear to have a tear in the cover paper, revealing something underneath. And that something is classic and recognizable: On "The Da Vinci Code," it's the Mona Lisa; on "Inferno," it's the dour-ish profile of Dante.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Dan Brown's new thriller "Inferno," starrring his tweedy hero Robert Langdon from "The Da Vinci Code," will be published May 14 in hardcover and as an e-book by Doubleday, the publisher announced Tuesday. In case you've forgotten "The Da Vinci Code" phenomenon, it spent more than a year -- 54 weeks -- topping the New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list after it was released in 2003. It has been translated into 51 languages and is considered the bestselling adult hardcover of all time with 81 million copies in print worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
With "The Da Vinci Code" author Dan Brown's news Tuesday morning that he would be releasing a new Robert Langdon adventure in May, we thought it wise to check in with the movie prospects for Brown's last Langdon tale, "The Lost Symbol," which resided on the New York Times hard-cover fiction bestseller list for 29 weeks and has 30 million copies in print worldwide. Sony's Columbia Pictures, which released the previous two films, "The DaVinci Code" and "Angels and Demons," owns the option to all of Brown's future projects involving Langdon, including "The Lost Symbol" and the upcoming "Inferno.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2010 | By mcclatchy-tribune
After Dan Brown's mega-selling "The Da Vinci Code" appeared in 2003, tracking the further adventures of Harvard University symbologist Robert Langdon (who first came on the scene in 2000's "Angels & Demons"), publishers were quick to unleash a landslide of titles to feed off the novel's success. Some were well-written fiction adventures that stood on their own, while others were hastily constructed reactions to Brown's thesis that Mary Magdalene was married to Jesus Christ and was pregnant by him when he was crucified.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2010 | By mcclatchy-tribune
After Dan Brown's mega-selling "The Da Vinci Code" appeared in 2003, tracking the further adventures of Harvard University symbologist Robert Langdon (who first came on the scene in 2000's "Angels & Demons"), publishers were quick to unleash a landslide of titles to feed off the novel's success. Some were well-written fiction adventures that stood on their own, while others were hastily constructed reactions to Brown's thesis that Mary Magdalene was married to Jesus Christ and was pregnant by him when he was crucified.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | Jenny Hendrix
Doubleday has announced that it will be giving away free e-books of Dan Brown's international bestseller "The Da Vinci Code" this week.  The free digital download is offered in celebration of the novel's 10th anniversary (to readers only in the U.S. and Canada). "The Da Vinci Code" was originally published March 18, 2003 and quickly sold more than 81 million copies. The free download isn't exactly a conspiracy, but it is, clearly, part marketing: Besides the best-selling art-historical whodunit, the ebook will include the prologue and first chapter of Brown's forthcoming thriller "Inferno," also featuring renowned symbologist Robert Langdon, which will be published in May. The free e-book deal is a natural digital outgrowth of teasing a sequel by including a first chapter in the back pages of a paperback.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Noel Murray
Funny People Universal, $29.98/$34.98; Blu-ray, $39.98 "Funny People" writer-director Judd Apatow might have tested his core audience a little too much with his story of a self-hating comedian (played by Adam Sandler) who gets diagnosed with cancer and asks for help from a fawning young stand-up (played by Seth Rogen). But Apatow and company don't spare the dirty jokes either, and there's something admirably uncompromising about their willingness to push for truth over likability.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. -- Fiction weeks on list 1. The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown (Doubleday: $25.99) Harvard 8 professor Robert Langdon uses his symbology skills to find a missing Freemason in Washington, D.C. 2. Nine Dragons by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown : 4 $27.99) An LAPD detective travels to Hong Kong to solve the murder of a Chinese immigrant. 3. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam: $24.95) The lives 23 of a maid, a cook and a college graduate become intertwined while changing a Mississippi town.
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