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Robert Lee

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1999
Westlake Village resident Robert Lee "Bob" Bohlke died Monday at UCLA Medical Center following a lengthy illness. He was 64. Bohlke was born Dec. 27, 1934, in Remsen, Iowa. He moved from Iowa to California in 1946 and was a longtime Westlake Village resident. Bohlke owned and operated Village Unocal gas station in Westlake Village for 40 years. He was a member of St. Jude's Catholic Church and the Knights of Columbus. He was active in organizing the Knights' annual Oktoberfest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
Paulette Phillips stared across the courtroom at her ex-husband and told him she had once loved him with all her heart. She had married Robert Lee Phillips, welcomed him into her South Los Angeles home and invited him to live alongside her children. In return, she said, "Bobby" gunned down two of her daughters. "I gave you everything I had," she said, her voice trembling. "You ruined my life. " On Wednesday, a Superior Court judge sentenced Robert Phillips to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the murders of Sabrina Taylor, 30, and Charlotte Johnson, 33. After the shooting, which occurred at a 2006 birthday celebration for Taylor, Paulette Phillips said she lost more than 100 pounds and spent time in a mental institution.
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SPORTS
January 27, 1988 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, Times Staff Writer
Robert Lee, Santa Ana High School's exceptional running back, said he has decided to quit football, something he said he has been contemplating for nearly a year. Lee, who rushed for 4,388 yards in three years--the second-highest in Orange County history behind the 5,397 by Valencia's Ray Pallares--cited a loss of enthusiasm as his main reason for leaving football. "I just don't (have) feelings for it anymore," Lee said. "I haven't had any emotion for the sport for a long time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
From horseback, he gazes out across parks and boulevards all over the American South. He lends his name to high schools, colleges and the iconic Dodge Charger in "The Dukes of Hazzard. " To some followers he's "the marble man," born to be made into statuary. So it's tempting for people today who don't see Gen. Robert E. Lee as unambiguously heroic to try to push him right out of his saddle. But a debunking approach didn't seem right to Mark Zwonitzer, whose new American Experience documentary on the Civil War figure broadcasts on PBS on Monday.
NEWS
July 26, 1987
A 13-year-old boy who disappeared from his family's appliance store in central Los Angeles Thursday returned safely Friday night after spending the night with a friend. Robert Lee, 13, had been last seen helping a Latino woman take purchases to her car. The boy, who family members said never liked working at the store, took a bus downtown to meet a friend. Lee ended the police search when he returned home at 10 p.m. Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1987
After listening to Fawn Hall's testimony, in which she said that her former boss, Lt. Col. North, was every secretary's dream of the "ideal boss," and after telling the committee that she worked 12 hours a day, five days a week for some four years, I believe it would be fair to say that she could be rated as every boss' dream of the "ideal secretary." ROBERT LEE Newport Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1985
The Times Poll has performed an important public service by bringing out the fact that capital punishment is supported by large majorities of California citizens with varying interests across the board. That fact should put an end to the charges of death penalty opponents that it is supported only by ultraconservative Republicans, by frightened senior citizens and by the rich people. The Times Poll clearly showed that regardless of age, employment, religion, political affiliation, race, education and locality, "in every category the majority supported capital punishment."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1988
Fonda had the right of free speech to join the protesters on college campuses and other public places who demonstrated against U.S. involvement in the Vietnamese struggle, but she definitely did not have the right to side with our nation's enemy. That was an inexcusable, defiant, disloyal action. She should make one more, curtain-call TV appearance and offer a genuine expression of apology and regret not only to the Vietnam vets but also to all of America. ROBERT LEE Newport Beach
OPINION
April 20, 2004
Please allow me to help correct a common misconception often seen in the acrimonious immigration debate. I am an American citizen and have many times in the past done construction work and even gardening. I was always glad to have the work and did it willingly. Letter writer Robert Lee (April 14) is simply wrong when he says these are jobs "no one [but illegals] would do." I'll gladly provide the specifics if he doubts me. Douglas Thompson Hermosa Beach
BUSINESS
March 6, 1988
UC Irvine has a group of self-appointed campus culinary experts who have originated a recipe calling for a new ingredient that must be added to hamburgers and other fast foods: their personal political views. When Carl's Jr. entered negotiations with UCI officials to supply a food trailer on campus, some activists protested because of what they called the owner's conservative political views, The Times reported. They did not object on epicurean or gourmet grounds; they flunked Carl Karcher because he didn't pass their political test.
SPORTS
September 19, 2010 | Eric Sondheimer
Three weeks into the high school football season, it's clear that Marqise Lee from Gardena Serra deserves an award for taking the biggest risk of any player. Call it self-confidence, courage or pure madness. He had the audacity to wear Serra's No. 2 jersey, vacated by the graduation of All-American Robert Woods. "It was kind of crazy," Coach Scott Altenberg said. "He asked for No. 2. I said, 'OK, the guy before had a pretty good career.'" Lee is having a pretty good career himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2004 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
In ways large and small, Robert Lees strove to live by his principles. One of them may have cost him his life. He believed in civil liberties and personal loyalty. In April 1951, near the peak of the nation's anti-communist hysteria, Lees was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee to name names.
OPINION
April 20, 2004
Please allow me to help correct a common misconception often seen in the acrimonious immigration debate. I am an American citizen and have many times in the past done construction work and even gardening. I was always glad to have the work and did it willingly. Letter writer Robert Lee (April 14) is simply wrong when he says these are jobs "no one [but illegals] would do." I'll gladly provide the specifics if he doubts me. Douglas Thompson Hermosa Beach
TRAVEL
March 16, 2003 | James T. Yenckel, Special to The Times
This pretty little college town in the Shenandoah Valley usually gets no more than a brief mention in history books, belying its status as a major Confederate shrine. No great battles were won or lost here, yet the Civil War movie "Gods and Generals," which opened last month, begins and ends in Lexington. Fate has bequeathed the town a notable heritage, fueled in part by two of its institutions: Virginia Military Institute and Washington and Lee University.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | Linda Wheeler, Washington Post
More than 80 years after the death of Mary Custis Lee, eldest and most headstrong daughter of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, two steamer trunks full of her papers and travel souvenirs have been found in a bank vault in suburban Alexandria, Va. The wooden trunks -- containing family letters, photographs, clippings of her father's obituary, strands of hair collected from royalty on European trips rarely taken by other single women of her era -- came to light after an inquiry from a descendant.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2002 | From Associated Press
A jury on Thursday sentenced serial killer Robert Lee Yates Jr. to death by injection for the aggravated murders of two women. The Pierce County Superior Court jury of seven men and five women began deliberating late Wednesday. On Sept. 19, the same panel convicted Yates of murdering Melinda Mercer, 24, in 1997 and Connie LaFontaine Ellis, 35, in 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1988
Well, The Times won't have Meese to kick around anymore. Not being able any longer to beat the dead horse of criminal accusations, The Times ("He Quits at Last," editorial, July 6) cannot gracefully accept defeat on that issue but says "it is beside the point" and switches to the charge that he should never have been appointed in the first place. Meese said he refused to resign earlier, despite the barrage of media and political criticism, because he refused to be "hounded out of office by false accusations or allegations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An apparently distraught 23-year-old Oxnard man killed by police nine days ago had retreated to a small bedroom closet before officers ended a standoff by opening the closet door and shooting the knife-wielding man as he rose toward them, officials said Saturday. "He started coming forward to the officers and he still had the knife," Assistant Oxnard Police Chief Stan Myers said Saturday. "That's when the shots were fired."
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his last moments, even with needles in his arms ready to flow with deadly toxins, even as he signaled prison officials to go ahead and get it over with, Robert Lee Massie remained icily stoic. For much of the last 35 years, the two-time killer had said he welcomed death rather than having to live the rest of his days in prison.
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