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Robert Lee Massie

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NEWS
March 27, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Lee Massie, a convicted killer who spent two separate stints on death row and gained notoriety while pursuing his own demise for more than 30 years, was executed by the State of California early this morning. Massie, who killed in 1965 and again in 1979, was pronounced dead at San Quentin State Prison. A combination of drugs was injected into the 59-year-old murderer's veins, first rendering him unconscious, and then killing him by stopping his heart and lungs.
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NEWS
March 28, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his last moments, even with needles in his arms ready to flow with deadly toxins, even as he signaled prison officials to go ahead and get it over with, Robert Lee Massie remained icily stoic. For much of the last 35 years, the two-time killer had said he welcomed death rather than having to live the rest of his days in prison.
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NEWS
March 23, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost everyone at Robert Lee Massie's execution early Tuesday will be there because they want to be, even Robert Lee Massie himself. For more than 30 years, he has been saying on and off that he wants the death penalty rather than spending his life in prison. But Massie--who killed in 1965 and again in 1979--has been kept alive again and again. First there was the stay of execution by then-Gov. Ronald Reagan in the late 1960s, then the abolishment of the death penalty by the U.S.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Lee Massie, a convicted killer who spent two separate stints on death row and gained notoriety while pursuing his own demise for more than 30 years, was executed by the State of California early this morning. Massie, who killed in 1965 and again in 1979, was pronounced dead at San Quentin State Prison. A combination of drugs was injected into the 59-year-old murderer's veins, first rendering him unconscious, and then killing him by stopping his heart and lungs.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Both the state Supreme Court and a federal district judge declined requests Friday to halt the execution of two-time killer Robert Lee Massie. Massie, scheduled to die early Tuesday, has given up his appeals and asked to be put to death. But others, including Northern California journalist Michael Kroll, are trying to stop the execution, contending that Massie is incompetent and his attorney, Frederick Baker, is providing ineffective counsel in going along with his client.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal judge ruled that witnesses, including the news media, may watch the entire execution of convicted murderer Robert Lee Massie, who is scheduled to be put to death next week. U.S. District Judge Vaughn R. Walker decided that the state cannot prevent witnesses from watching Massie as he is escorted into the death chamber, strapped onto a gurney and inserted with intravenous lines.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his last moments, even with needles in his arms ready to flow with deadly toxins, even as he signaled prison officials to go ahead and get it over with, Robert Lee Massie remained icily stoic. For much of the last 35 years, the two-time killer had said he welcomed death rather than having to live the rest of his days in prison.
NEWS
April 10, 2001
In City of Angles (April 1) [about actor Mike Farrell and convicted killer Robert Lee Massie], Cardinal Mahony was quoted as having said, "You can't teach that killing is wrong by killing." Yet Mahony and his supporters have mistaken the lesson of capital punishment. Execution is not intended to teach the condemned person that killing is wrong; indeed, their possession of that knowledge is a necessary prerequisite for their being sentenced to death. Rather, capital punishment acknowledges the moral dignity that society affords to all people, including murderers.
OPINION
September 25, 2012
We stopped being shocked by flagrantly dishonest campaign claims long ago, but sometimes the disingenuousness is so flagrant that it still gets our blood boiling - especially when it happens in lower-profile political races in which campaign managers are figuring that fact-checkers won't bother to call them out. Such is the case with the No on Proposition 34 campaign. Proposition 34, which this page endorsed in May, would eliminate the death penalty in California and replace it with a sentence of life without the possibility of parole.
OPINION
October 22, 2011
Gregory Powell, better known to L.A. history buffs and fans of novelist Joseph Wambaugh as the "Onion Field" killer, is going to die in prison. That's fine with the Los Angeles Police Protective League, the family of Powell's victim and even Powell himself. But it does raise questions about the state's "compassionate release" program and whether killers should be set free when their time is nearly up. In 1963, Powell and an accomplice abducted Los Angeles Police Officers Ian Campbell and Karl Hettinger at gunpoint, drove them to an onion field near Bakersfield and executed Campbell.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Both the state Supreme Court and a federal district judge declined requests Friday to halt the execution of two-time killer Robert Lee Massie. Massie, scheduled to die early Tuesday, has given up his appeals and asked to be put to death. But others, including Northern California journalist Michael Kroll, are trying to stop the execution, contending that Massie is incompetent and his attorney, Frederick Baker, is providing ineffective counsel in going along with his client.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost everyone at Robert Lee Massie's execution early Tuesday will be there because they want to be, even Robert Lee Massie himself. For more than 30 years, he has been saying on and off that he wants the death penalty rather than spending his life in prison. But Massie--who killed in 1965 and again in 1979--has been kept alive again and again. First there was the stay of execution by then-Gov. Ronald Reagan in the late 1960s, then the abolishment of the death penalty by the U.S.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal judge ruled that witnesses, including the news media, may watch the entire execution of convicted murderer Robert Lee Massie, who is scheduled to be put to death next week. U.S. District Judge Vaughn R. Walker decided that the state cannot prevent witnesses from watching Massie as he is escorted into the death chamber, strapped onto a gurney and inserted with intravenous lines.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vowing to "end the abuses of jailhouse informants" if elected state attorney general, San Francisco Dist. Atty. Arlo Smith on Monday criticized his Los Angeles counterpart, Ira Reiner, for soliciting courtroom testimony from unreliable informants. "He's using them to enhance his conviction rate," Smith said of Reiner, his opponent in next Tuesday's state Democratic primary. "He has no concern about victims."
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court refused Thursday to allow condemned inmates to keep a personal spiritual advisor by their side right up to the moment they are led away to their execution. The court unanimously upheld a prison rule that requires spiritual advisors to leave the condemned inmate 45 minutes before the execution. Prison officials said the regulation is needed to protect the identities of the execution team.
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