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Robert Lees

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2004 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
In ways large and small, Robert Lees strove to live by his principles. One of them may have cost him his life. He believed in civil liberties and personal loyalty. In April 1951, near the peak of the nation's anti-communist hysteria, Lees was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee to name names.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
Paulette Phillips stared across the courtroom at her ex-husband and told him she had once loved him with all her heart. She had married Robert Lee Phillips, welcomed him into her South Los Angeles home and invited him to live alongside her children. In return, she said, "Bobby" gunned down two of her daughters. "I gave you everything I had," she said, her voice trembling. "You ruined my life. " On Wednesday, a Superior Court judge sentenced Robert Phillips to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the murders of Sabrina Taylor, 30, and Charlotte Johnson, 33. After the shooting, which occurred at a 2006 birthday celebration for Taylor, Paulette Phillips said she lost more than 100 pounds and spent time in a mental institution.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1999
Should the FBI now be known as the FIB? ROBERT LEES Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
From horseback, he gazes out across parks and boulevards all over the American South. He lends his name to high schools, colleges and the iconic Dodge Charger in "The Dukes of Hazzard. " To some followers he's "the marble man," born to be made into statuary. So it's tempting for people today who don't see Gen. Robert E. Lee as unambiguously heroic to try to push him right out of his saddle. But a debunking approach didn't seem right to Mark Zwonitzer, whose new American Experience documentary on the Civil War figure broadcasts on PBS on Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2000
It's the Supreme Court, stupid! ROBERT LEES Los Angeles
OPINION
August 18, 1996
No matter what the GOP puts up for sale their ship of state is stuck in the Doledrums. ROBERT LEES Los Angeles
BUSINESS
September 3, 1991 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Lees arrived in Moscow a few weeks ago to do a little business and found himself in the middle of a coup. Lees is president of Pacific InterTrade Corp., a Westlake Village company that helps American concerns set up complex trading deals in foreign countries. He traveled to the Soviet Union to arrange the export to a factory in Lithuania of U.S.-made equipment used in fabricating television picture tubes. But on Aug.
NEWS
January 10, 1991
A memorial service has been scheduled for Jan. 25 in Portland, Ore., for Robert Lee Bonaparte, a retired vice president of Boise Cascade Corp. and one of the principal investors when the Schramsberg Vineyards in Calistoga were revitalized in 1965. Bonaparte, who was 67 when he died Dec. 22 of heart failure at his Portland home, was a specialist in marketing newsprint. He joined Boise Cascade in 1963 and retired in 1987.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | Linda Wheeler, Washington Post
More than 80 years after the death of Mary Custis Lee, eldest and most headstrong daughter of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, two steamer trunks full of her papers and travel souvenirs have been found in a bank vault in suburban Alexandria, Va. The wooden trunks -- containing family letters, photographs, clippings of her father's obituary, strands of hair collected from royalty on European trips rarely taken by other single women of her era -- came to light after an inquiry from a descendant.
SPORTS
January 27, 1988 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, Times Staff Writer
Robert Lee, Santa Ana High School's exceptional running back, said he has decided to quit football, something he said he has been contemplating for nearly a year. Lee, who rushed for 4,388 yards in three years--the second-highest in Orange County history behind the 5,397 by Valencia's Ray Pallares--cited a loss of enthusiasm as his main reason for leaving football. "I just don't (have) feelings for it anymore," Lee said. "I haven't had any emotion for the sport for a long time.
SPORTS
September 19, 2010 | Eric Sondheimer
Three weeks into the high school football season, it's clear that Marqise Lee from Gardena Serra deserves an award for taking the biggest risk of any player. Call it self-confidence, courage or pure madness. He had the audacity to wear Serra's No. 2 jersey, vacated by the graduation of All-American Robert Woods. "It was kind of crazy," Coach Scott Altenberg said. "He asked for No. 2. I said, 'OK, the guy before had a pretty good career.'" Lee is having a pretty good career himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2004 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
In ways large and small, Robert Lees strove to live by his principles. One of them may have cost him his life. He believed in civil liberties and personal loyalty. In April 1951, near the peak of the nation's anti-communist hysteria, Lees was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee to name names.
TRAVEL
March 16, 2003 | James T. Yenckel, Special to The Times
This pretty little college town in the Shenandoah Valley usually gets no more than a brief mention in history books, belying its status as a major Confederate shrine. No great battles were won or lost here, yet the Civil War movie "Gods and Generals," which opened last month, begins and ends in Lexington. Fate has bequeathed the town a notable heritage, fueled in part by two of its institutions: Virginia Military Institute and Washington and Lee University.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | Linda Wheeler, Washington Post
More than 80 years after the death of Mary Custis Lee, eldest and most headstrong daughter of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, two steamer trunks full of her papers and travel souvenirs have been found in a bank vault in suburban Alexandria, Va. The wooden trunks -- containing family letters, photographs, clippings of her father's obituary, strands of hair collected from royalty on European trips rarely taken by other single women of her era -- came to light after an inquiry from a descendant.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2002 | From Associated Press
A jury on Thursday sentenced serial killer Robert Lee Yates Jr. to death by injection for the aggravated murders of two women. The Pierce County Superior Court jury of seven men and five women began deliberating late Wednesday. On Sept. 19, the same panel convicted Yates of murdering Melinda Mercer, 24, in 1997 and Connie LaFontaine Ellis, 35, in 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An apparently distraught 23-year-old Oxnard man killed by police nine days ago had retreated to a small bedroom closet before officers ended a standoff by opening the closet door and shooting the knife-wielding man as he rose toward them, officials said Saturday. "He started coming forward to the officers and he still had the knife," Assistant Oxnard Police Chief Stan Myers said Saturday. "That's when the shots were fired."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000
Robert Lee Hamic, a former stock exchange director, died Saturday in Orange. He had recently moved to Orange County from Newbury Park. He was 54. He was born on March 3, 1946, in Lynwood. He grew up there and graduated from Dominguez High School where he played football. Hamic began working at McDonnell Douglas in Huntington Beach and then enlisted in the Army. He served in Vietnam and was once part of the NATO Intelligence Corps in Brussels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1999
Westlake Village resident Robert Lee "Bob" Bohlke died Monday at UCLA Medical Center following a lengthy illness. He was 64. Bohlke was born Dec. 27, 1934, in Remsen, Iowa. He moved from Iowa to California in 1946 and was a longtime Westlake Village resident. Bohlke owned and operated Village Unocal gas station in Westlake Village for 40 years. He was a member of St. Jude's Catholic Church and the Knights of Columbus. He was active in organizing the Knights' annual Oktoberfest.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his last moments, even with needles in his arms ready to flow with deadly toxins, even as he signaled prison officials to go ahead and get it over with, Robert Lee Massie remained icily stoic. For much of the last 35 years, the two-time killer had said he welcomed death rather than having to live the rest of his days in prison.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Lee Massie, a convicted killer who spent two separate stints on death row and gained notoriety while pursuing his own demise for more than 30 years, was executed by the State of California early this morning. Massie, who killed in 1965 and again in 1979, was pronounced dead at San Quentin State Prison. A combination of drugs was injected into the 59-year-old murderer's veins, first rendering him unconscious, and then killing him by stopping his heart and lungs.
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