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Robert Lepage

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2000 | LOUISE ROUG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Lepage, a leading Canadian theater artist, takes the stage Friday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre in "Far Side of the Moon," a play that promises to be quite a trip. A cultural nomad and somewhat apologetic postmodernist, the 42-year-old director-actor has created some of the most innovative international theater of the last two decades, fusing video, theater and puppetry. "A lot of people think theater is dead, that it's defunct, a ghost," Lepage said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
How to enumerate the myriad wonders and delights of “Totem,” now taking its viewers on a dazzling trek from the primordial to the cosmic? For starters, there's Cirque du Soleil's signature yellow-and-blue Grand Chapiteau, rising from the Port of Los Angeles like a pasha's tent by Marc Chagall.   Inside, designer Carl Fillion's strategic, surprise-laden set sports a giant tortoise shell down center, putting our senses on immediate high alert. Composers-musical directors Bob & Bill concoct a burst of pan flute and traditional drums, delivered by the redoubtable musicians hidden behind the marsh reeds upstage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The man in the moon is no idle image for Robert Lepage, the masterfully inventive Canadian theater artist who brought his "The Far Side of the Moon" to the Irvine Barclay Theatre on Friday and Saturday. Lepage's piece--virtually a solo--focuses on Philippe, an outwardly drab fellow who's still working on an advanced academic degree as he enters middle age. He supports his studies--moonlights, you might say--as a newspaper telemarketer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Stoudt is a freelance writer.
A room snowing with static. A cyclist furiously pedaling forward but heading backward. Chinese characters that bleed into being on a screen. These are pieces in Robert Lepage and Ex Machina's theatrical puzzle "The Blue Dragon," now playing at the Freud as part of UCLA Live's International Theatre Festival. This work in progress, co-commissioned by the festival, marks the celebrated Quebecois hyphenate's first appearance on stage in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
How to enumerate the myriad wonders and delights of “Totem,” now taking its viewers on a dazzling trek from the primordial to the cosmic? For starters, there's Cirque du Soleil's signature yellow-and-blue Grand Chapiteau, rising from the Port of Los Angeles like a pasha's tent by Marc Chagall.   Inside, designer Carl Fillion's strategic, surprise-laden set sports a giant tortoise shell down center, putting our senses on immediate high alert. Composers-musical directors Bob & Bill concoct a burst of pan flute and traditional drums, delivered by the redoubtable musicians hidden behind the marsh reeds upstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1990 | BRENDAN KELLY
"The Dragons' Trilogy" suddenly became topical this year. Writer-director Robert Lepage and the Quebec City troupe Theatre Repere created the sprawling, epic play five years ago--long before the current wave of tension between French- and English-speaking people that has shaken Canada's political landscape. That often uneasy relationship is at the heart of "The Dragons' Trilogy."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Stoudt is a freelance writer.
A room snowing with static. A cyclist furiously pedaling forward but heading backward. Chinese characters that bleed into being on a screen. These are pieces in Robert Lepage and Ex Machina's theatrical puzzle "The Blue Dragon," now playing at the Freud as part of UCLA Live's International Theatre Festival. This work in progress, co-commissioned by the festival, marks the celebrated Quebecois hyphenate's first appearance on stage in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
How do you make the Frida Kahlo story feel fresh? This challenge may not have seemed so daunting when "La Casa Azul," a biographical dramatization of the Mexican artist, opened in Montreal in 2001. But the production has arrived in Los Angeles, at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, in the wake of the movie "Frida" -- which opened last fall amid a surge of publicity, won two Oscars and is about to be released on video and DVD. "La Casa Azul" also follows a decade of sporadic performances in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
They call it "the lion's den." A long-standing tradition at Cirque du Soleil, it takes place during the final stages of rehearsal each time the Montreal-based company launches a new show. Veterans of previous Cirque productions are invited to watch a run-through and offer bilingual support and criticism, in English and French. One day last month at the MGM Grand Hotel, Canadian stage director Robert Lepage was about to be thrown to the lions for the first time.
NEWS
September 16, 2004 | Don Shirley
"KA," Cirque du Soleil's upcoming show at the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas, will open for previews Nov. 26 in the 1,951-seat theater built for it, the Cirque announced Wednesday. The combined cost of theater and production will be more than $165 million, said a Cirque spokesman. Ticket prices will range from $99 to $150. Staged by avant-garde Canadian director Robert Lepage, "KA" will be built around the theme of duality.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
They call it "the lion's den." A long-standing tradition at Cirque du Soleil, it takes place during the final stages of rehearsal each time the Montreal-based company launches a new show. Veterans of previous Cirque productions are invited to watch a run-through and offer bilingual support and criticism, in English and French. One day last month at the MGM Grand Hotel, Canadian stage director Robert Lepage was about to be thrown to the lions for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
How do you make the Frida Kahlo story feel fresh? This challenge may not have seemed so daunting when "La Casa Azul," a biographical dramatization of the Mexican artist, opened in Montreal in 2001. But the production has arrived in Los Angeles, at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, in the wake of the movie "Frida" -- which opened last fall amid a surge of publicity, won two Oscars and is about to be released on video and DVD. "La Casa Azul" also follows a decade of sporadic performances in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The man in the moon is no idle image for Robert Lepage, the masterfully inventive Canadian theater artist who brought his "The Far Side of the Moon" to the Irvine Barclay Theatre on Friday and Saturday. Lepage's piece--virtually a solo--focuses on Philippe, an outwardly drab fellow who's still working on an advanced academic degree as he enters middle age. He supports his studies--moonlights, you might say--as a newspaper telemarketer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2000 | LOUISE ROUG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Lepage, a leading Canadian theater artist, takes the stage Friday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre in "Far Side of the Moon," a play that promises to be quite a trip. A cultural nomad and somewhat apologetic postmodernist, the 42-year-old director-actor has created some of the most innovative international theater of the last two decades, fusing video, theater and puppetry. "A lot of people think theater is dead, that it's defunct, a ghost," Lepage said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1990 | BRENDAN KELLY
"The Dragons' Trilogy" suddenly became topical this year. Writer-director Robert Lepage and the Quebec City troupe Theatre Repere created the sprawling, epic play five years ago--long before the current wave of tension between French- and English-speaking people that has shaken Canada's political landscape. That often uneasy relationship is at the heart of "The Dragons' Trilogy."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2005 | From Reuters
The creators of a new opera based on the novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four" did not have to work hard to make George Orwell's nightmarish vision of a loveless and brutal world meaningful for audiences today. Technology used for surveillance and control, the denial of personal freedom, Doublethink, Newspeak and a seemingly endless war place a work written in 1948 firmly in the 21st century.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Opera fans who haven't yet had the opportunity to weigh in on the Metropolitan Opera's new -- and divisive -- production of Wagner's "Ring" cycle, take note: PBS will air the four operas on consecutive evenings beginning  Sept. 11. A multimillion-dollar effort directed by Robert Lepage, the Met's "Ring" cycle become something of a punching bag for some of New York City's critics, with much of the harsh words reserved for the production's ambitious staging, which included a 45-ton set of revolving planks.
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