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Robert Loggia

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NEWS
June 2, 1991 | SUSAN KING
In an upcoming episode of Norman Lear's new CBS sitcom, "Sunday Dinner," Robert Loggia suddenly bursts into song. And not just any song, but the Richard Rodgers-Oscar Hammerstein classic "People Will Say We're In Love" from "Oklahoma!" It's an unexpected moment from the actor who has made a name for himself as one of the premier movie and TV tough guys thanks to his performances in "An Officer and a Gentleman," "The Jagged Edge" (for which he received an Oscar nomination) and "Mancuso, F.B.I."
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HOME & GARDEN
November 16, 2009 | By Lauren Beale
Update: Actor Robert Loggia has sold his longtime Bel-Air home for $2.95 million, the Multiple Listing Service shows. The French Country-style home, with five bedrooms and four bathrooms in 4,620 square feet, sits on half an acre. The gated house, built in 1968, was recently remodeled and has a flexible floor plan with two second-story master suites. There are two-story windows, high ceilings and four fireplaces. Loggia, 79, has been a familiar face on TV and movies for decades.
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HOME & GARDEN
April 11, 2009 | ANN BRENOFF; Lauren Beale
Who can keep track of those Spice Girls and their real estate doings? Scary Spice (Melanie Brown), who apparently got the nickname for not always following Emily Post's advice, no sooner listed her Hollywood Hills home for $2,999,999 than it sold for more than the asking price. The contemporary, which the Multiple Listing Service described as "ultra chic," came on the market in late March and sold for $3.14 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1987 | Craig Modderno
Assemblyman Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica) felt like he was watching "Back to the Future" when he visited the Glendale set last week of HBO's ". . . And Nothing But the Truth: The Chicago Conspiracy Trial." Claimed the one-time Vietnam War activist: "All the actors bore an eerie resemblance to the original defendants. They had adopted our mannerisms and even the attitude that we didn't get along or know each other. I felt like I was granted the right to return to my past."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1988 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Writers Gary Ross and Anne Spielberg popped into New York's F.A.O. Schwarz one afternoon to research children's tastes for their screenplay "Big." Among the 40,000 square feet of toys, they noticed an electronic toy piano that enables a child to pick out a tune by jumping on the right keys. It was a lucky find. This summer "Big" is a hit, so far grossing more than $60 million at the box office, and that Walking Piano is the center of the season's most popular dance scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1988
"Intrigue" (Sunday at 9 p.m. on CBS Channels 2 and 8) sounds like a generic movie, to be followed by "Comedy," "Romance" and "Mystery." It isn't quite as bland as all that. Robert Loggia's scruffy presence as an American defector who wants to return home adds grit to the film. The most tantalizing aspect of the plot is that both sides want this guy, dead or alive, and he can't figure out what he knows that's so important to them.
HOME & GARDEN
November 16, 2009 | By Lauren Beale
Update: Actor Robert Loggia has sold his longtime Bel-Air home for $2.95 million, the Multiple Listing Service shows. The French Country-style home, with five bedrooms and four bathrooms in 4,620 square feet, sits on half an acre. The gated house, built in 1968, was recently remodeled and has a flexible floor plan with two second-story master suites. There are two-story windows, high ceilings and four fireplaces. Loggia, 79, has been a familiar face on TV and movies for decades.
HOME & GARDEN
April 11, 2009 | ANN BRENOFF; Lauren Beale
Who can keep track of those Spice Girls and their real estate doings? Scary Spice (Melanie Brown), who apparently got the nickname for not always following Emily Post's advice, no sooner listed her Hollywood Hills home for $2,999,999 than it sold for more than the asking price. The contemporary, which the Multiple Listing Service described as "ultra chic," came on the market in late March and sold for $3.14 million.
NEWS
September 9, 1990
My wife and I miss "Mancuso FBI" and are very much concerned about this wonderful NBC series. Salvatore Armato, Marina del Rey Your concern is well founded. NBC canceled the Robert Loggia drama last spring.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | SUSAN KING
In an upcoming episode of Norman Lear's new CBS sitcom, "Sunday Dinner," Robert Loggia suddenly bursts into song. And not just any song, but the Richard Rodgers-Oscar Hammerstein classic "People Will Say We're In Love" from "Oklahoma!" It's an unexpected moment from the actor who has made a name for himself as one of the premier movie and TV tough guys thanks to his performances in "An Officer and a Gentleman," "The Jagged Edge" (for which he received an Oscar nomination) and "Mancuso, F.B.I."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1988
"Intrigue" (Sunday at 9 p.m. on CBS Channels 2 and 8) sounds like a generic movie, to be followed by "Comedy," "Romance" and "Mystery." It isn't quite as bland as all that. Robert Loggia's scruffy presence as an American defector who wants to return home adds grit to the film. The most tantalizing aspect of the plot is that both sides want this guy, dead or alive, and he can't figure out what he knows that's so important to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1988 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Writers Gary Ross and Anne Spielberg popped into New York's F.A.O. Schwarz one afternoon to research children's tastes for their screenplay "Big." Among the 40,000 square feet of toys, they noticed an electronic toy piano that enables a child to pick out a tune by jumping on the right keys. It was a lucky find. This summer "Big" is a hit, so far grossing more than $60 million at the box office, and that Walking Piano is the center of the season's most popular dance scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1987 | Craig Modderno
Assemblyman Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica) felt like he was watching "Back to the Future" when he visited the Glendale set last week of HBO's ". . . And Nothing But the Truth: The Chicago Conspiracy Trial." Claimed the one-time Vietnam War activist: "All the actors bore an eerie resemblance to the original defendants. They had adopted our mannerisms and even the attitude that we didn't get along or know each other. I felt like I was granted the right to return to my past."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1988 | Leonard Klady
Meanwhile, Sohmer is busy writing a "Favorite Son" spinoff pilot for NBC called "Mancuso FBI"--the role played in the mini by Robert Loggia. Mancuso's first name in the novel was Joe, but the bureau asked Sohmer to change it for the miniseries for unspecified security reasons. Sohmer chose "Nick"--unaware of actor Nick Mancuso. This, even though Sohmer was head of NBC's ad/promotion department and did the trailers for the network's "Stingray" series . . . when Mancuso was starring in it!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
These Are the Days: Archie Bunker, Edith, Meathead and Gloria are returning to prime time this summer. Though CBS would not officially confirm, writer-producer Norman Lear says reruns of his classic CBS series, "All in the Family," will join the CBS lineup on June 2 for a limited run. The landmark sitcom, which starred Carroll O'Connor, Jean Stapleton, Sally Struthers and Rob Reiner, will air Sundays at 8:30 p.m.
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