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Robert Longo

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
New York Times art critic Roberta Smith recently referred to artist Robert Longo as "Robert Long Ago." It's a cruel joke but an apt one because Longo has come to symbolize the '80s boom in American art that everyone agrees is pretty much over. However, Longo's career crisis isn't so much symptomatic of the vagaries of the art market as it is a result of his naivete in regards to the press. Though Longo fancies himself a savvy media manipulator, his understanding of public relations isn't so hot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1995 | DAVID A. GREENE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; David A. Greene is a writer and artist based in Los Angeles
Lately, a strange phenomenon has occurred in the worlds of art and entertainment: So-called "art stars" of the 1980s have emerged from hibernation and are now showing up in all the old familiar places--in the glossy magazines and on the streets of New York--and some unfamiliar ones too, like on your local movie screen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1989 | WILLIAM WILSON
Today, the County Museum of Art opens an ambitious survey exhibition of the multimedia New York artist Robert Longo. It is, by gallery standards, as spectacular as "The Phantom of the Opera" and as ominous as Darth Vader with its running theme of The Oppressive Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
When New York artist Robert Longo befriended writer William Gibson six years ago, it was to prove a fortuitous turn of events. The grand pooh-bah of cyberpunk, a recently minted genre of fiction that combines elements of the pulp detective thriller, punk, Existentialism and the high-tech end of science fiction, Gibson has turned out several vividly cinematic novels tailor-made for the movie screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
When New York artist Robert Longo befriended writer William Gibson six years ago, it was to prove a fortuitous turn of events. The grand pooh-bah of cyberpunk, a recently minted genre of fiction that combines elements of the pulp detective thriller, punk, Existentialism and the high-tech end of science fiction, Gibson has turned out several vividly cinematic novels tailor-made for the movie screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1985
There is nothing original or rebellious about the Neo-Expressionist movement and its wealthy illustrators. That Messrs. Eric Fischl, Robert Longo, David Salle and Julian Schnabel have enjoyed tremendous financial and public success serves as a concise metaphor for the cultural emptiness of our times. Thankfully, many art critics have been uncustomarily ahead of the artists' (which is not difficult in this case) and, for the most part, dismiss this entire movement. MAX ESTENGER Cerritos
BOOKS
February 18, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
One of the foremost choreographer/performance teams in post-modern dance, Bill T. Jones and Arnie Zane created challenging, innovative works in collaboration with Robert Longo, Keith Haring and other artists. Like their dances, this book defies neat categorization. A collage of reviews, photographs, monologues, reminiscences and reflections, it stands as a memorial to their collaboration: Zane died of AIDS in 1988. Jones continues to work, confronting the loss of his lover through movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1990
Regarding William Wilson's Feb. 11 review of the Francis Bacon exhibit at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art: I admit to snickering at a recent LACMA exhibition. Not at Francis Bacon's paintings--I snickered at all the people fawning over Robert Longo's superficiality. So Bacon belongs to the era of Existentialists and beatniks. Fine. Kurt Schwitters belongs to the era of Dadaists, revolutionaries and prophets. Cezanne and Goya belong to their times. I do not snicker at art because it belongs to another time.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1989 | MARLENA DONOHUE
A selection of recent works by Robert Longo complements a survey at LACMA and offers no surprises. This is quintessential Longo, exerting the same zany hypnotic power over our visual experience that the artist has long accused the media of exerting over the American consciousness. "Freud Was (Machine Virus)" is a huge photo image of a hand tightly squeezing a man's hat. The image is forcefully invaded by a neon-bright 3-D stake that sends cartoon vectors of force jutting into the viewer's space.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Too much performance art falls short as performance craft . That was not a problem with Robert Longo's "Dream Jumbo: Working the Absolutes," performed over the weekend at Royce Hall, UCLA. Like his paintings and 3-D triptychs at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Longo's stage pieces have the certainty of composition that one associates with commercial art. The viewer knows where he is supposed to look, and the artist knows how much information he wants to give out.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Going from the art world to Hollywood is like trying to transfer to a college that doesn't accept your credits," says Robert Longo, one of several young visual artists who established thriving careers in the '80s and have been trying to cross over into film ever since. New York artists David Salle and Jeff Koons both have film projects they've been struggling to launch for a few years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
New York Times art critic Roberta Smith recently referred to artist Robert Longo as "Robert Long Ago." It's a cruel joke but an apt one because Longo has come to symbolize the '80s boom in American art that everyone agrees is pretty much over. However, Longo's career crisis isn't so much symptomatic of the vagaries of the art market as it is a result of his naivete in regards to the press. Though Longo fancies himself a savvy media manipulator, his understanding of public relations isn't so hot.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1990
Regarding William Wilson's Feb. 11 review of the Francis Bacon exhibit at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art: I admit to snickering at a recent LACMA exhibition. Not at Francis Bacon's paintings--I snickered at all the people fawning over Robert Longo's superficiality. So Bacon belongs to the era of Existentialists and beatniks. Fine. Kurt Schwitters belongs to the era of Dadaists, revolutionaries and prophets. Cezanne and Goya belong to their times. I do not snicker at art because it belongs to another time.
BOOKS
February 18, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
One of the foremost choreographer/performance teams in post-modern dance, Bill T. Jones and Arnie Zane created challenging, innovative works in collaboration with Robert Longo, Keith Haring and other artists. Like their dances, this book defies neat categorization. A collage of reviews, photographs, monologues, reminiscences and reflections, it stands as a memorial to their collaboration: Zane died of AIDS in 1988. Jones continues to work, confronting the loss of his lover through movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1989 | GREGG WAGER
Anyone wondering what it would sound like to put 10 scattered, improvising, avant-garde musicians under the same roof got their chance at the latest Monday Evening Concert at the County Museum of Art. In a haphazard tribute to the Robert Longo exhibit there, an event called "The Ear and the Eye" proved the realization of an anemic idea. Named after a defunct nearby restaurant, the Egg and the Eye, the concept was attributed to Dorrance Stalvey, director of music programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1989 | GREGG WAGER
Anyone wondering what it would sound like to put 10 scattered, improvising, avant-garde musicians under the same roof together got their chance at the latest Monday Evening Concert at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. In a haphazard tribute to the Robert Longo exhibit there, an event called "The Ear and the Eye" proved the realization of an anemic idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1989 | GREGG WAGER
Anyone wondering what it would sound like to put 10 scattered, improvising, avant-garde musicians under the same roof together got their chance at the latest Monday Evening Concert at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. In a haphazard tribute to the Robert Longo exhibit there, an event called "The Ear and the Eye" proved the realization of an anemic idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Too much performance art falls short as performance craft . That was not a problem with Robert Longo's "Dream Jumbo: Working the Absolutes," performed over the weekend at Royce Hall, UCLA. Like his paintings and 3-D triptychs at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Longo's stage pieces have the certainty of composition that one associates with commercial art. The viewer knows where he is supposed to look, and the artist knows how much information he wants to give out.
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