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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
A brief, long-lost essay by "Treasure Island" author Robert Louis Stevenson will be published on Friday, the Associated Press reports. The essay will appear in the Strand magazine, a mystery fiction quarterly out of Birmingham, Mich. The Strand has previously uncovered famous authors' unpublished works. In 2009, there was first Mark Twain and then Graham Greene ; in 2011, Dashiell Hammett and Cornell Woolrich ; and in 2012, James M. Cain . Although short, the Stevenson piece, titled "Books and Reading.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
A brief, long-lost essay by "Treasure Island" author Robert Louis Stevenson will be published on Friday, the Associated Press reports. The essay will appear in the Strand magazine, a mystery fiction quarterly out of Birmingham, Mich. The Strand has previously uncovered famous authors' unpublished works. In 2009, there was first Mark Twain and then Graham Greene ; in 2011, Dashiell Hammett and Cornell Woolrich ; and in 2012, James M. Cain . Although short, the Stevenson piece, titled "Books and Reading.
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TRAVEL
March 12, 1989 | THOMAS HILGERS, Hilgers is a free-lance writer living in Honolulu.
Every visitor to this island has at least one encounter with Robert Louis Stevenson. Perhaps it is through his words, quoted in a travel book: "Time flies in the enjoyment of every pleasure which an islander conceives." Perhaps it is through a would-be guide on the steps of the Aggie Grey Hotel who offers to take you to Vailima, the home that Stevenson loved. Or it may be through the name of capital city Apia's newest hotel, Tusitala.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2011
BOOKS Celebrate the spooky season with three chilling adaptations of classic horror literature presented at an actual cemetery with Wicked Lit. Walk the hallowed burial grounds as three scary stories unfold around you: Robert Louis Stevenson's "The Body Snatcher," M.R. James' "Casting the Runes," and Mark Twain's "A Ghost Story. " Mountain View Mortuary and Cemetery, 2400 N. Marengo Ave., Altadena. Thu.-Mon. 8 p.m. and Nov. 2-Nov. 6 at 8 p.m. $39-$60. (818) 242-7910. http://www.wickedlit.org.
NEWS
February 12, 1994
Ellen Shaffer, 89, rare books expert and internationally known authority on Robert Louis Stevenson. A native of Leadville, Colo., who was educated at the University of Colorado and UCLA, Miss Shaffer taught briefly and then began her career in rare books at Los Angeles' Dawson's Book Shop. During her quarter-century at the shop, she established herself as an expert, assisting collectors and speaking and writing widely about specific volumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1999 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You were made for the journey and your soul is in the struggle." That heart-to-heart observation about living life isn't your run-of-the-mill children's theater dialogue, but "My Bed Is a Boat: The Adventures of Robert Louis Stevenson," at the Lex Theatre in Hollywood, isn't a run-of-the-mill children's play.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
So personally edgy and nudgy is Ian Bell's book on Robert Louis Stevenson, that it almost could be called "Louis and Me." It is a biography but there are times when it suggests a memoir--remarkably, since Stevenson died in 1895 and Bell, who is the Scottish editor of London's Observer, is presumably in the prime of life. The author tells us he is not a scholar; and "Dreams of Exile" seems to uncover few details of his subject's much-written-about life.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | Joe Saltzman
Any youngster who can resist one-legged pirates, secret maps and buried treasure should be sentenced to spend the next year reading Robert Louis Stevenson. If he or she can't read, order the wayward child to do the next best thing-watch Stevenson's "Treasure Island" on the small screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1992 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a moment at Saturday night's performance of "Treasure Island" that might summarize what was right, and occasionally wrong, with this Theatrefaire for Children production, which continues through Sunday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. As splintered shafts of sunlight streamed through the trees, and tropical birds called, a gloriously grungy band of pirates plotted a murderous course to treasure.
NEWS
August 31, 1999 | Michael Harris, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Why 'Kidnapped'?" Barry Menikoff asks rhetorically in introducing this new edition of the Robert Louis Stevenson classic, in which the text we read as kids has been tweaked to conform with the original handwritten manuscript at the Huntington Library in San Marino. After all, says Menikoff, a professor at the University of Hawaii and a leading authority on Stevenson, "the displacement of Gutenberg's culture by that of the flashing pixel seems assured."
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Catherine Watson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even in darkness, on the way from the airport, Samoa didn't look like anywhere else I'd been in Polynesia — not like Rarotonga or Fiji, not like Tahiti or Easter Island. Open pavilions dotted the roadsides almost as frequently as the small houses. Some were more brightly lighted: Designed as ovals and sometimes squares, their thatched roofs supported by pillars, they glowed like cages in the hot tropical night. In some small ones, families were watching TV, as if the pavilions were open-air living rooms.
BOOKS
January 29, 2006 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Written Lives Javier Marias, translated from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa New Directions: 200 pp., $22.95 JOSEPH CONRAD "wore a monocle and disliked poetry," hated Fyodor Dostoevsky, loved cigarettes and his yellow-and-white striped bathrobe. Isak Dinesen didn't live on a diet of oysters and champagne (which doesn't mean the rest of us can't); she also ate "prawns, asparagus, grapes, and tea."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2002 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Treasure Planet" is another one for the boys. Disney's latest animated adventure is a hybrid on several levels, starting with relocating Robert Louis Stevenson's classic lads' tale "Treasure Island" in a space-travel world. Although it may sound gimmicky, the notion of setting the popular story of young Jim and the pirate John Silver in a fantasy world based on the planet Montressor (French for "my treasure") turns out to be an excellent, much more appealing one than might be imagined.
TRAVEL
October 24, 1999 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
"My life," Fanny Stevenson once said, "resembles a wild ride on the crest of a wave that rolls and never breaks." Born in Indiana in 1841, she followed her first husband to the gold fields of Nevada when she was 23, ran away to France to study art with three young children in tow, fell in love with a gaunt young Scotsman named Robert Louis Stevenson and roamed the world with him, ending up in Western Samoa, where her husband, author of "Treasure Island" and "Kidnapped," died in 1894.
NEWS
August 31, 1999 | Michael Harris, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Why 'Kidnapped'?" Barry Menikoff asks rhetorically in introducing this new edition of the Robert Louis Stevenson classic, in which the text we read as kids has been tweaked to conform with the original handwritten manuscript at the Huntington Library in San Marino. After all, says Menikoff, a professor at the University of Hawaii and a leading authority on Stevenson, "the displacement of Gutenberg's culture by that of the flashing pixel seems assured."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1999 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You were made for the journey and your soul is in the struggle." That heart-to-heart observation about living life isn't your run-of-the-mill children's theater dialogue, but "My Bed Is a Boat: The Adventures of Robert Louis Stevenson," at the Lex Theatre in Hollywood, isn't a run-of-the-mill children's play.
BOOKS
December 19, 1993 | DICK RORABACK
DREAMS OF EXILE: Robert Louis Stevenson: A Biography by Ian Bell (Henry Holt: $25; 296 pp.) Biographies run in cycles. Soon after the subject's death, authors rush to confer sainthood, or genius. After an indecent interval the debunkers take over. Thus Robert Louis Stevenson is declared a "parasitic buffoon," an "insane stork." It's the third wave of biographers that most often balances the boat. Ian Bell's Stevenson is exasperating, spoiled, arbitrary--but above all courageous.
TRAVEL
October 24, 1999 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
"My life," Fanny Stevenson once said, "resembles a wild ride on the crest of a wave that rolls and never breaks." Born in Indiana in 1841, she followed her first husband to the gold fields of Nevada when she was 23, ran away to France to study art with three young children in tow, fell in love with a gaunt young Scotsman named Robert Louis Stevenson and roamed the world with him, ending up in Western Samoa, where her husband, author of "Treasure Island" and "Kidnapped," died in 1894.
BOOKS
May 3, 1998 | JEREMY TREGLOWN, Jeremy Treglown is former editor of the (London) Times Literary Supplement and teaches at the University of Warwick. He edited "The Lantern-Bearers and Other Essays by Robert Louis Stevenson."
"The whole tale of my life is better to me than any poem," Robert Louis Stevenson wrote excitedly from Honolulu to a London friend in 1889. It's a tale that has often been told but nowhere with more zest and vividness than in his own letters. Ernest Mehew spent 25 meticulous years preparing the eight-volume complete edition that Yale University Press published for the centenary of Stevenson's death in 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1996 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Are the Muppets for kids anymore? Let's see. Gilbert & Sullivan-type songs with fast-and-witty lyrics. Characters with nearly unintelligible accents. Jokes about Miss Piggy's chronically dysfunctional love affairs as a pig who loves men who hate pigs. Though the movie tries--via explosions of gunpowder, sword fights and threats of gunplay--to reach children weaned on action films, some could barely keep their eyes open through all the singing and talking.
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