Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Luketic
IN THE NEWS

Robert Luketic

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the summer began, the entertainment media were awash in stories forecasting the season's big films by A-list directors such as Steven Spielberg, Tim Burton and Michael Bay. But who could have predicted that the summer box-office heat would be fueled by films made by a string of unsung directors such as Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson, Rob Cohen, Lawrence Guterman, Joe Johnston and Robert Luketic? Don't recognize their names?
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the summer began, the entertainment media were awash in stories forecasting the season's big films by A-list directors such as Steven Spielberg, Tim Burton and Michael Bay. But who could have predicted that the summer box-office heat would be fueled by films made by a string of unsung directors such as Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson, Rob Cohen, Lawrence Guterman, Joe Johnston and Robert Luketic? Don't recognize their names?
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008
Adventure: In an interview in the February issue of Vanity Fair, Steven Spielberg promises that "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull," the fourth film in his action adventure franchise, will have more of a sci-fi bent but will retain the spirit of its predecessors. Due out this summer, the film sees Harrison Ford reprise his role as the world-weary archaeologist, while actors Shia LaBeouf and Cate Blanchett join the ensemble. -- Film festival: Director Robert Luketic's Vegas-set drama "21" will open the 15th annual edition of South by Southwest's Film Conference & Festival on March 7. Based on a book by Ben Mezrich, the film stars Jim Sturgess, Kate Bosworth, Kevin Spacey and Laurence Fishburne and recounts how six college students became expert card counters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Win a Date With Tad Hamilton!" is a sweet-natured romantic comedy that's easy viewing but could have used a little more energy and a little less unalloyed niceness to put it over with more punch. As with the recent "Chasing Liberty," it's not likely to have much appeal beyond romance-fantasizing teenage girls. Kate Bosworth's Rosalee Futch is a lovely and levelheaded supermarket cashier in Fraziers Bottom, W. Va., who wins a date with a Hollywood movie star, a hunky heartthrob.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2010 | By Robert Abele
Hoping for something swift and painless is one thing if you're the target of an assassination. It's a futile wish, though, when you're subjected to the death that is the Ashton Kutcher- Katherine Heigl vehicle "Killers." Is it some monstrosity of awfulness, as its lack of advance screening suggested? No, that would imply at least a spark of some kind. This is just an empty summer hodgepodge of stale romantic comedy exchanges, witlessness and lackluster action. It's a movie that starts in sun-kissed Nice, France, and segues to faceless American suburbs, to give you an idea of its metaphorical trajectory.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A high concept can be a wonderful thing. Up to a point. It can get your film sold and maybe even make it look attractive, but it can't ensure much of anything else. Case in point, may it please the court, is "Legally Blonde." Starring Reese Witherspoon as a Bel-Air airhead wending her way through law school, "Legally Blonde" is basically "Clueless Goes to Harvard." Nothing wrong with that notion, but, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I've seen "Clueless" and this is no "Clueless."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
For some reason, probably because I missed "Jersey Girl," "Gigli," "Maid in Manhattan," "The Cell," "Angel Eyes" and "Enough," all I could think about while watching Jennifer Lopez prance through "Monster-in-Law" was how cool and poised she was in "Out of Sight," wrapped in caramel leather and releasing more heat than a polar ice cap. But that was a long time ago. In "Monster-in-Law," directed by Robert Luketic ("Legally Blonde," "Win a Date With Tad Hamilton!"
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | Susan King
Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Russell Crowe, Paul Bettany Fox, $40 Extras on DVDs have become predictable -- with "documentaries" that are so short they are geared for viewers with the attention span of a gnat. There are no such complaints with the seaworthy two-disc set of "Master and Commander." Peter Weir's classy, ambitious and immensely entertaining film is about British naval hero Jack Aubrey and his crew of the HMS Surprise as they battle the French in 1805.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2008 | Noel Murray
21 Sony, $28.96/$34.95; Blu-ray, $38.96 Based on Ben Mezrich's nonfiction bestseller "Bringing Down the House," director Robert Luketic's "21" doesn't make much of an effort to get the details right, but what the movie loses in authenticity, it recovers in kinetic dazzle. Jim Sturgess plays an MIT math whiz who leads a team of brainiacs in an elaborate takedown of Las Vegas' blackjack tables. Fast-paced and lighthearted, "21" is like a 21st century "Risky Business."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2008 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
When the makers of the blackjack drama “21” stepped up to the table to place their bets, they opted to play it safe. In this extremely loose adaptation of Ben Mezrich's nonfiction tome "Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six M.I.T. Students Who Took Vegas for Millions," screenwriters Peter Steinfeld and Allan Loeb have buffed down the story's rougher edges into a Hollywood fairy tale.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | Noel Murray
Up Walt Disney, $29.99/$39.99; Blu-ray, $45.99 The creative team at Pixar has become so skilled that it can take a loosely plotted story about an elderly man, a lonely Boy Scout, a talking dog and a flying house and turn it into one of the most popular -- and best -- movies of the year. A lot of justified praise has been thrown at "Up's" opening sequence, in which the arc of a lifelong love affair is laid out in five gorgeous, wordless minutes, but the rest of the movie is just as artful, using wild jungle adventure as a metaphor for one man's need to let go. The DVD and Blu-ray are typically top-flight, adding a hilarious new short film, commentary tracks and entertaining behind-the-scenes featurettes.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|