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Robert Lutz

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BUSINESS
March 4, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch
Robert A. Lutz, an outspoken and colorful industry veteran who has worked for all of the major American car companies, said Wednesday he will retire May 1 from his post as vice chairman of General Motors Co., ending a 47-year career in the industry. Lutz, 78, started a second stint at GM in 2001, charged with revitalizing the automaker's vehicle lineup. He stayed with the company through its brief sojourn into bankruptcy last year and has seen a new generation of GM autos -- including the Buick LaCrosse, Cadillac SRX, GMC Terrain, Chevrolet Equinox and Chevrolet Camaro -- start to take hold in the marketplace.
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BUSINESS
November 20, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Outspoken and colorful auto industry veteran Robert A. Lutz, who has worked for all the major American car companies and retired from General Motors Co. in May, has resurfaced, helping British sports car maker Lotus expand its range of vehicles. "I am convinced that this company has the best team in the history of Lotus. This may be the first time they have had it all together," he said. Lutz, who has spent 47 years in the industry, sat down with The Times at the Los Angeles Auto Show and talked about Lotus and GM's return to the stock market.
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BUSINESS
November 17, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Lutz, the flamboyant former Chrysler Corp. executive who helped spark the auto maker's 1990s renaissance, hopes to use his management prowess to rescue the maker of Diehard batteries. Exide Corp., the world's leading manufacturer of lead-acid batteries for auto and industrial uses, said Monday that Lutz will become chairman, president and chief executive officer Dec. 1. Lutz, 66, is taking over an embattled company that has been under fire for several months.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch
Robert A. Lutz, an outspoken and colorful industry veteran who has worked for all of the major American car companies, said Wednesday he will retire May 1 from his post as vice chairman of General Motors Co., ending a 47-year career in the industry. Lutz, 78, started a second stint at GM in 2001, charged with revitalizing the automaker's vehicle lineup. He stayed with the company through its brief sojourn into bankruptcy last year and has seen a new generation of GM autos -- including the Buick LaCrosse, Cadillac SRX, GMC Terrain, Chevrolet Equinox and Chevrolet Camaro -- start to take hold in the marketplace.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert S. Miller, a leading candidate to succeed Lee A. Iacocca and one of the heroes of Chrysler Corp.'s brush with bankruptcy in 1980, said Monday that he is leaving the car maker to become a Wall Street investment banker. Miller, 50, vice chairman and chief financial officer at Chrysler, was named a senior partner at James D. Wolfensohn Inc., the blue chip firm chaired by former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul A. Volcker. Miller's departure appeared to solidify the position of Robert A.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp., an auto maker run largely by finance and management specialists, Thursday hired former Chrysler Corp. executive Robert Lutz--one of the industry's preeminent "car guys"--as vice chairman for product development. It is a major admission by the world's biggest car company that it needs help revitalizing a product line that has been leaving consumers cold for decades. GM, which sold more than half of all cars and light trucks in the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Big Chrysler Investor Wants Lutz to Follow Iacocca: Chrysler Corp.'s second-largest stockholder is pushing the auto maker to name President Robert Lutz as Chairman Lee A. Iacocca's successor. "Our posture is that the company's working beautifully in a product sense, and that reflects directly on Lutz," said Charles Freeman, Wellington Management Co.'s senior vice president. Wellington Management owns 8.9% of Chrysler. California billionaire Kirk Kerkorian owns 9.8%.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2001 | Bloomberg News
General Motors Corp. is negotiating to hire former Chrysler Corp. Vice Chairman Robert Lutz as a senior executive to help improve its vehicles and reverse sliding market share, people familiar with the talks said. Lutz, 69, chairman and chief executive of battery maker Exide Technologies, may have the power to approve or veto vehicle programs, the people said. Lutz resigned as Exide CEO Wednesday, effective Sept. 1, but will remain chairman.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Automotive industry icon Robert A. Lutz said he wanted to retire from General Motors Corp. after the company brings a plug-in electric car to market, possibly sometime in 2010. The 75-year-old Lutz, now GM's vice chairman for global product development, is shepherding development of the Chevrolet Volt, which the company sees as a mainstream electric sedan that can be recharged by plugging it into a household outlet.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1991
Chrysler Corp. announced a reorganization that promoted Robert A. Lutz to president, a possible sign that he is in line to succeed Lee A. Iacocca as head of the troubled auto maker. Lutz is an engineer who has worked for General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Corp. and the German auto maker BMW. He had been president of Chrysler Motors, a remnant of a former car- and truck-making subsidiary at Chrysler.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Automotive industry icon Robert A. Lutz said he wanted to retire from General Motors Corp. after the company brings a plug-in electric car to market, possibly sometime in 2010. The 75-year-old Lutz, now GM's vice chairman for global product development, is shepherding development of the Chevrolet Volt, which the company sees as a mainstream electric sedan that can be recharged by plugging it into a household outlet.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2003 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
It's a litany of woes. Wall Street analysts say Detroit automakers are dinosaurs, import brands continue nibbling away at market share, and for the last two years it has seemed impossible to sell domestic cars without huge rebates. But Robert Lutz is unfazed. General Motors Corp.'s 71-year-old vice chairman and product guru, brought back two years ago as a kind of savior, simply smiles and shakes his white-capped head in bemusement. Although GM's U.S.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp.'s new vice chairman and product czar, Robert A. Lutz, was named head of GM North America on Tuesday, signaling an attempt by the world's largest auto maker to return product design and development to the forefront of its business. Lutz replaces Ronald L. Zarrella, who is leaving the company after seven years to become chief executive at his old employer Bausch & Lomb Inc., the optical products maker. Lutz, 69, was a longtime top executive at the former Chrysler Corp.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp., an auto maker run largely by finance and management specialists, Thursday hired former Chrysler Corp. executive Robert Lutz--one of the industry's preeminent "car guys"--as vice chairman for product development. It is a major admission by the world's biggest car company that it needs help revitalizing a product line that has been leaving consumers cold for decades. GM, which sold more than half of all cars and light trucks in the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2001 | Bloomberg News
General Motors Corp. is negotiating to hire former Chrysler Corp. Vice Chairman Robert Lutz as a senior executive to help improve its vehicles and reverse sliding market share, people familiar with the talks said. Lutz, 69, chairman and chief executive of battery maker Exide Technologies, may have the power to approve or veto vehicle programs, the people said. Lutz resigned as Exide CEO Wednesday, effective Sept. 1, but will remain chairman.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Lutz, the flamboyant former Chrysler Corp. executive who helped spark the auto maker's 1990s renaissance, hopes to use his management prowess to rescue the maker of Diehard batteries. Exide Corp., the world's leading manufacturer of lead-acid batteries for auto and industrial uses, said Monday that Lutz will become chairman, president and chief executive officer Dec. 1. Lutz, 66, is taking over an embattled company that has been under fire for several months.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerald Greenwald's decision to give up his role as heir apparent to Lee A. Iacocca, in favor of a less-certain future heading an effort to buy United Airlines' parent, left a void in Chrysler's top management that the auto company Thursday moved quickly to fill. On the day after Greenwald, the 54-year-old Chrysler vice chairman, resigned to take charge of a union-led, $4 billion-plus buyout effort, Chairman Iacocca announced that R. S.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chrysler Chairman Lee A. Iacocca, in a repudiation of his top lieutenant, is expected today to announce the recruitment of a highly regarded General Motors executive to succeed him as chief executive. Robert J. Eaton, 52, an up-from-the-ranks auto engineer who is president of GM's highly profitable European subsidiary, would take over day-to-day control at the end of the year, when the 67-year-old Iacocca is to retire.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lee A. Iacocca said Monday that he will step down as Chrysler Corp.'s chairman, as well as its chief executive, at the end of 1992 and turn both posts over to Robert J. Eaton, who was General Motors Corp.'s top executive in Europe. Eaton was named vice chairman and chief operating officer Monday and given a seat on Chrysler's board of directors. He will become chairman and chief executive on Dec. 31. Robert A. Lutz, who was passed over for the top jobs, will remain on as Chrysler president.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chrysler Chairman Lee A. Iacocca, in a repudiation of his top lieutenant, is expected today to announce the recruitment of a highly regarded General Motors executive to succeed him as chief executive. Robert J. Eaton, 52, an up-from-the-ranks auto engineer who is president of GM's highly profitable European subsidiary, would take over day-to-day control at the end of the year, when the 67-year-old Iacocca is to retire.
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