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NEWS
June 30, 1993
Robert M. Horowitz, director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Fruit and Vegetable Chemistry Laboratory in Pasadena, has died at the age of 71. Horowitz, who suffered a heart attack a year ago, died Friday of heart failure at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica, his wife, Sylvia, said Tuesday. Raymond Bennett, his successor and colleague for 20 years, described Horowitz as a world-class scientist recognized internationally for his study of natural product chemistry.
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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
When I saw the first tweet about this, I truly thought it was a hoax. But no, it seems wine critic Robert M. Parker Jr. is launching a lifestyle magazine. Wine-searcher.com has the story and describes the mag as aimed at "high net-worth individuals and corporate leaders. " In other words, Robb Report territory. And what will his new magazine be called? It's not hard to guess: “100 Points by Robert Parker.” Oh, no. Oh, yes. John Stimpfig reports that The Wine Advocate has signed a deal with publishers Hubert Burda Media to publish the new international lifestyle magazine quarterly.
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NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
Lettie Teague at the Wall Street Journal reports this morning that the world's most followed wine critic is stepping down. Robert M. Parker Jr. will no longer be editor in chief of the Wine Advocate , an influential newsletter the former lawyer started in 1978, with a loan from his mom. A Bloomberg story by Edmund Lee reveals that the Wine Advocate has taken on three investors from Singapore. The new editor will be the Wine Advocate's Asian correspondent, Singapore-based Master of Wine Lisa Perrotti-Brown . The headquarters will remain in Maryland, where Parker lives, but the newsletter will open a second office in Singapore, the better to serve the expanding Asian market.
FOOD
October 26, 2013 | S. Irene Virbila
If you think you don't like off-dry Riesling, open up a bottle of this lovely floral Riesling from a Mösel estate that goes back to 1177 and has been owned by the same family since 1804. The 2011 Mönchhof Riesling's honeyed sweetness is balanced by a racy acidity and an earthy minerality. A touch of bitterness pulls it all into focus. The more you keep drinking, the more you'll find in the glass: white peaches, honeysuckle. And this Mösel Riesling is a great value. Open a bottle to accompany a fiery chicken or beef larb . It goes with Thai or any spicy Asian cuisine too. I'd try it with lobster or grilled prawns, and with Chinese noodle dishes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2000
Robert M. Leeds, 79, director of "The Beverly Hillbillies" TV series. A native of New York City, Leeds went into the entertainment industry when he was stationed in Hollywood with the Army during World War II, making top-secret military films. In the early 1950s, he worked as a film editor for Jack Webb's Mark VII Productions on "Dragnet" and two of Webb's motion pictures, "30" and "Pete Kelly's Blues." He later directed the Webb company's police series "Adam 12" in the 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1997
Robert M. Hunt, 69, former president and chief executive officer of the Chicago Tribune and former publisher and president of the New York Daily News. He also served on the board of trustees of Northwestern University and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation. He was with the Tribune for 29 years, starting as a classified ad salesman. On Saturday at his home in Naples, Fla., after a long illness.
NEWS
May 16, 1987 | Associated Press
Robert M. Jacobson, editor of Opera News magazine, has died of complications resulting from AIDS. He was 46 and died Saturday at St. Vincent's Hospital of respiratory failure, according to Rocci Genova, his longtime companion. Jacobson, who began as a critic for Musical America in 1963, worked for Opera News--a publication of the Metropolitan Guild--for 12 years and became a prominent advocate of opera and the arts in frequent lectures and television appearances.
NEWS
September 30, 1995
Robert M. Galloway, 68, senior vice president and director of technical services at Kaufman & Broad Home Corp. A native of Glasgow, Scotland, Galloway was selected to the Scottish international soccer team seven times. He was an engineer who founded a consulting firm in Newport Beach in 1965. In 1974, he became international director of engineering and planning for Kaufman & Broad.
NEWS
March 26, 1997
Robert M. Light, 85, veteran head of the Southern California Broadcasters Assn. Light served as president and chief spokesman of the organization for 30 years. Through commentary and frequent letters to The Times, Light reassured the public that local broadcasters were equipped to provide communications in the event of earthquake or other catastrophe.
NEWS
May 25, 1992
Robert M. Page, 88, a pioneer in the development of radar. As a scientist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in 1936, Page built a transmitter that could send a quick series of radio signals and a receiver that could detect the signals as they bounced back from an object. In Britain, Robert Watson-Watt had independently started work on a radar project in 1935.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
DALLAS - What do neo-classicism and neo-conservatism have in common? That's the question at the heart of the design by New York's Robert A.M. Stern Architects for the George W. Bush presidential library, set to open to the public May 1 on the campus of Southern Methodist University. The $250-million complex holds the president's archive as well as a museum, restaurant, auditorium, policy institute and foundation. Officially known as the George W. Bush Presidential Center, it is carefully and cannily contextual, like much of Stern's work.
NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
Lettie Teague at the Wall Street Journal reports this morning that the world's most followed wine critic is stepping down. Robert M. Parker Jr. will no longer be editor in chief of the Wine Advocate , an influential newsletter the former lawyer started in 1978, with a loan from his mom. A Bloomberg story by Edmund Lee reveals that the Wine Advocate has taken on three investors from Singapore. The new editor will be the Wine Advocate's Asian correspondent, Singapore-based Master of Wine Lisa Perrotti-Brown . The headquarters will remain in Maryland, where Parker lives, but the newsletter will open a second office in Singapore, the better to serve the expanding Asian market.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
The Senate unanimously confirmed Leon E. Panetta as secretary of Defense on Tuesday, putting the Pentagon in the hands of a former Democratic congressman and budget expert amid growing political discontent over the cost and reach of President Obama's military engagements. Panetta, who spent two years as director of the Central Intelligence Agency, will replace Robert M. Gates, who is retiring after serving in two consecutive administrations. In a statement, Panetta thanked the Senate "for the strong vote of confidence" and said he was "deeply honored" by the 100-0 tally and the president's nomination.
WORLD
June 9, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Wednesday urged more NATO allies to join the air campaign against Libya, arguing that it was putting a strain on the seven members of the 28-nation alliance that are carrying the burden in a conflict that shows few signs of ending soon, U.S. officials said. In a sign of the growing strain that the 3-month-old operation is putting on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Gates took the unusual step of naming five alliance members with limited or no role in the operation that he said should provide strike aircraft to hit ground targets in Libya or other capabilities, according to a senior U.S. official.
WORLD
June 2, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Wednesday dismissed as "garbage" reports that a senior Marine general was passed over to be chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff because of his back-channel role in the 2009 administration debate on sending additional troops to Afghanistan. Speaking to reporters on his way to a security conference in Singapore, Gates denied that Gen. James Cartwright, the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs, was not chosen as chairman because he helped White House aides develop options for sending fewer troops to Afghanistan than the number favored by Gates and other top Pentagon officials.
WORLD
April 22, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
President Obama has approved the use of armed Predator drone aircraft to launch airstrikes against ground targets in Libya, the latest sign of mounting concern in Washington that the NATO-led air campaign has failed to stop Moammar Kadafi's forces from shelling the besieged city of Misurata and other populated areas. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, who announced the decision at a Pentagon news conference, said Predators armed with Hellfire missiles would be used to augment airstrikes by warplanes from other North Atlantic Treaty Organization nations against the intensifying attacks by forces loyal to Kadafi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2000
Robert M. Abell, 76, president of the A.N. Abell Auction Co., and former president and treasurer of the Southern California Auctioneers Assn. Born in Los Angeles, Abell graduated from USC with a degree in business in 1949 after serving in the U.S. Army medical corps. While running the family business started by his father in 1916, Abell donated his time to more than 1,000 charity auctions, raising millions of dollars for worthy causes.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snooping abroad for clues to illicit plots is one of the CIA's primary missions, but the agency disclosed Friday that it had discovered a criminal operation embarrassingly close to home. Joseph P. Romello, 41, an upper-management CIA veteran of 12 years, pleaded guilty Friday to charges that he conspired to defraud the agency and the U.S. government of about $1.2 million, the Justice Department and the CIA announced. Acting on an anonymous tip to CIA Inspector General Frederick P.
WORLD
March 27, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
Top Obama administration officials predicted that Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi's regime may crack from within, as allied warplanes, resurgent rebels and the international community put more pressure on Tripoli. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, in appearances on Sunday talk shows, said they had received indications that some officials close to Kadafi might be ready to abandon him. "We have a lot of evidence that people around him are reaching out," Clinton said on NBC's "Meet the Press.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Washington Bureau
President Obama, traveling in Brazil, met with senior national security officials on a conference call Sunday morning to discuss the opening hours of the international military campaign against Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi. U.S. and European forces struck Libyan air defenses and other targets starting Saturday, using warships and fighter jets. On Sunday, U.S., French and British forces continued blasting military targets . Obama talked at 9:30 a.m. with Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, National Security Adviser Tom Donilon, Deputy National Security Adviser Denis McDonough and Gen. Carter Ham, head of the U.S. military operations in Africa, the White House said.
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