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Robert M Ball

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BUSINESS
January 28, 1994 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Beverly Hills attorney and eight others were arrested Thursday after being indicted in what officials are calling one of the biggest workers' compensation fraud rings in Los Angeles history. The scam, as authorities describe it, allegedly generated phony insurance claims worth tens of millions of dollars and was one of the most brazen and sophisticated workers' compensation frauds yet uncovered.
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BUSINESS
January 28, 1994 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Beverly Hills attorney and eight others were arrested Thursday after being indicted in what officials are calling one of the biggest workers' compensation fraud rings in Los Angeles history. The scam, as authorities describe it, allegedly generated phony insurance claims worth tens of millions of dollars and was one of the most brazen and sophisticated workers' compensation frauds yet uncovered.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2008 | Joel Havemann and Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writers
Robert M. Ball, an indefatigable champion of Social Security who was present practically at its creation in 1935 and rose in the bureaucracy to become its commissioner under three presidents, has died. He was 93. Ball, a resident of suburban Maryland, died Tuesday night after a brief illness, according to the National Academy of Social Insurance. Ball was the founding chairman of the organization.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Robert M. Ball is one of the most revered figures in Social Security history, a man whose devotion to safeguarding the program from ideological attacks and political cant over six decades made him the program's  "undisputed spiritual leader. " Alice M. Rivlin is a distinguished budget expert at the  Brookings Institution  whose willingness to promote "entitlement reform" (read: cut benefits) as a deficit nostrum has given her a reputation as a danger to Social Security and  Medicare . So when Rivlin was named the ninth recipient of the annual Robert M. Ball Award for Outstanding Achievements in Social Insurance this week, Social Security advocates erupted in fury.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republicans on the Senate Finance Committee Monday denounced a Democratic proposal to cut Social Security taxes as a "sugar-coated poison pill" that would jeopardize the payment of retirement benefits by the end of the decade. The sharp GOP criticism came at the first hearing on a plan put forward by Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.) that has drawn support from some conservative Republicans in Congress and is being studied seriously by the Democratic leadership in both the House and Senate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2003 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
In a victory for hundreds of thousands of government workers, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday that public employees can file discrimination lawsuits against governmental agencies without pursuing internal civil service remedies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1994 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court, providing a crack in the shield that protects employers from most workers' suits, held Thursday that a Los Angeles Fedco employee can sue the chain for falsely imprisoning her during an interrogation over whether she stole $4.95. The unanimous decision is significant because California workers generally have no recourse in the courts when they are injured physically or emotionally on the job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Chances are pretty good that Niles A. DeGrate was the only homeless man sipping champagne Friday on Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills. He had just found out that a judge awarded him $1.25 million for racial abuse directed at him in his last job, and DeGrate felt like celebrating in his lawyers' office. "I am still kind of numb," said DeGrate, 52, who has been living in public buildings and on city streets around Los Angeles for much of the last two years.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Robert M. Ball, a staunch liberal, was worried about being one of just five Democrats on a 15-member commission appointed to rescue the failing Social Security system in 1982. But the Republican chairman, conservative economist Alan Greenspan, quickly dispelled Ball's fears. "He was very fair, he got the confidence of all of us on the Democratic side very quickly by letting us share in staff selection and in making the agenda," said Ball, a former head of the Social Security Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1995 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes he slept in the Superior Courthouse Downtown. "I had a special little place," Niles DeGrate said, "in the attorneys' conference room." When he couldn't sleep there, he simply slept outside in front of the courthouse--especially if he had to be in court the next morning. Not only was DeGrate representing himself in his lawsuit against the company that fired him in 1990, he was virtually living in the places that he used as resources for his dogged legal pursuit.
NATIONAL
May 30, 2005 | Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writer
Like many other retirees, Bob Ball is concerned about what's going to happen to Social Security. From his cluttered office in his otherwise tidy retirement community home, he has proposed his own formula for shoring up Social Security's financial future.
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