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Robert M Bass

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BUSINESS
September 6, 1988
Robert M. Bass, the man who wants to buy American Savings & Loan, is a baby-faced Texas tycoon who comes from one of America's richest families. Not a great deal is known about the 40-year-old Bass, and that's the way he likes it. He does not grant interviews nor does he like to read his name in the newspaper. Bass is part of a clan of four brothers from Ft. Worth who inherited the seeds of their present fortune almost 30 years ago from a bachelor great-uncle.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Investment Groups Reportedly Want Coldwell Banker: A management team and two investment groups are reportedly negotiating to buy Coldwell Banker Residential Services, the home sales operation that retailing giant Sears, Roebuck & Co. put up for sale last year. Boston-based Bain Capital and Acadia Partners--a Ft. Worth, Tex., investment group that includes billionaire Robert Bass--would provide financial backing for the acquisition, according to a report in Crain's Chicago Business.
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BUSINESS
December 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
A man was held Thursday on racketeering and extortion charges for an alleged plot to kidnap Texas billionaire Robert M. Bass and hold him for $5-million ransom, authorities reported. Austin James Veleff, 57, of Germantown, Tenn., was arrested by FBI agents on Wednesday after he had driven to Texas with an undercover agent he thought was going to help him.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1992 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Savings Bank acquired ailing Valley Federal Savings & Loan on Friday in a deal arranged by federal regulators, while BankAmerica Corp. took a major step into the Texas market by buying the failed Sunbelt Federal Savings in Dallas. Separately, federal regulators disclosed that Texas billionaire Robert M. Bass, who owns American Savings, will pump $1 million into Family Savings Bank, a Los Angeles-based thrift that is one of the nation's largest minority-owned institutions.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1990 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It owned a foreclosed bordello, a mine that produced a Kitty Litter-like gravel for cats and a collection of securities and loans that at one point were worth a staggering $3 billion less than their original value. In short, American Savings, once the nation's largest savings and loan, up until the end of 1988 was the thrift industry's equivalent of a huge toxic waste dump. It was a mess in need of a mind-boggling clean-up job, with nasty surprises lurking everywhere.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
S&L Asset Sale Approved: The agency conducting the government's cleanup of the S&L industry has approved the biggest sale to date of a package of sour loans. The Resolution Trust Corp. is selling a portfolio of loans on California and Arizona real estate, with a face value of $1.1 billion, to General Electric Capital Corp. and a company affiliated with the Robert Bass Group. Their winning bid was $527 million. About 70% of the loans are on apartment buildings.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | Associated Press
Texas billionaire Robert Bass and his wife, Anne, gave $25 million to Stanford University on Thursday, calling the gift a vote of confidence in the school that is under fire for how it spent federal research dollars. "This is a gift given, really, out of respect for the university," Robert Bass told reporters outside a university board of trustees meeting where the donation was revealed.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal Resolution Trust Corp., as part of a new Bush Administration initiative to cut the cost of the thrift bailout, said Friday that it will seek to renegotiate the government-assisted sale of American Savings & Loan in 1988. The Robert M. Bass Group of Ft. Worth purchased insolvent American Savings in late 1988 with an estimated $2.7 billion in federal assistance.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal Resolution Trust Corp. said Friday that it will seek to renegotiate the 1988 federally assisted sale of American Savings & Loan to the Robert M. Bass Group, as part of a new initiative of the Bush Administration. Bass of Fort Worth, Tex., bought insolvent American Savings in late 1988 with an estimated $2.7 billion in federal assistance. The deal was among a flurry of controversial sales of troubled thrifts in 1988 that critics have said amounted to a federal giveaway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1990 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city officials Monday announced a proposal to use $48 million in taxpayer funds to jump-start a stalled Hollywood development project viewed as the cornerstone of the mammoth redevelopment effort for the movie capital. The $300-million Hollywood Promenade project--a vast commercial, retail and entertainment complex that would wrap around the famous Mann's Chinese Theatre--was thought by many to be doomed.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1990 | GREG JOHNSON and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A group led by Idanta Partners, a La Jolla investment firm whose principal owners are the Bass brothers of Texas, has acquired 7.2% of HomeFed Corp.'s outstanding shares, according to a Friday filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Idanta founder and general partner David J. Dunn on Friday maintained that his firm acquired the HomeFed stock for investment purposes only.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As mayor of San Francisco, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Dianne Feinstein supported two major projects in which her husband's close associates had financial interests, according to records and interviews. In one project, she lobbied for the sale of land to the city for a new Marriott hotel, centerpiece in the biggest urban renewal effort of her Administration. The major representative for Marriott was a longtime friend and business partner of Feinstein's husband, money manager Richard C.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The government's 11th-hour sales of troubled savings and loan associations to private investors in 1988 were "giveaways," House Banking Committee Chairman Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.) said Friday. The deals during 1988, including the sale of Stockton-based American Savings & Loan to a group led by Texas billionaire Robert M.
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