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Robert M Freeman

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BUSINESS
July 9, 1987
U.S. District Judge Shirley Wohl Kram denied the motion that accused prosecutors of improperly leaking secret grand jury information to the press. She said defense lawyers failed to prove that the U.S. attorney's office violated a federal rule that generally forbids disclosure of matters before a grand jury. The case involves three Wall Street professionals who were indicted April 9 but who at present do not face criminal charges: Robert M. Freeman, a partner at Goldman, Sachs & Co.; Richard B.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
Robert M. Freeman, the former Goldman, Sachs & Co. executive convicted of insider trading in 1989, agreed Monday to surrender $1.1 million and to a three-year suspension from the securities industry. Freeman and the Securities and Exchange Commission reached the agreement in what may be the last chapter in the government's insider-trading probe of the 1986 Beatrice Companies Inc. takeover. Freeman agreed to surrender $1.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
Robert M. Freeman, the former Goldman, Sachs & Co. executive convicted of insider trading in 1989, agreed Monday to surrender $1.1 million and to a three-year suspension from the securities industry. Freeman and the Securities and Exchange Commission reached the agreement in what may be the last chapter in the government's insider-trading probe of the 1986 Beatrice Companies Inc. takeover. Freeman agreed to surrender $1.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A highly publicized insider trading case that turned into an embarrassment for prosecutors ended Tuesday with the sentencing of Robert M. Freeman, the former head of risk arbitrage at Goldman, Sachs & Co., to four months in prison and a $1-million fine. U.S. District Judge Pierre N. Leval said Freeman's exemplary character and the relatively minor nature of the single charge he pleaded guilty to ordinarily would have led him to allow Freeman to remain free.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for three Wall Street executives accused of insider trading charged Monday that an attempt by federal prosecutors to drop the indictment is an improper tactic designed to win the government time to improve a weak case. The lawyers asked a federal judge to order that a trial based on the indictment begin as scheduled May 26. Alternatively, the defense lawyers asked U.S. District Judge Louis L.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge dismissed insider trading charges against three prominent Wall Street securities traders Tuesday in what was, ironically, a blow to the defendants. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Louis Stanton means that the traders could be reindicted at virtually any time in the next four years, or until the statute of limitations expires on the conspiracy and securities-fraud counts, according to one defense attorney.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Prominent Los Angeles stockbroker Boyd L. Jefferies pleaded guilty Thursday to two federal felony counts, including one charging that he helped stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky break securities laws. Jefferies had disclosed March 19 that he had agreed to plead guilty to the dual counts, to resign the chairmanship of the brokerage he founded and to accept a ban from the securities industry for at least five years.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1987 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Unocal, whose bloody 1985 battle against takeover artist T. Boone Pickens Jr. has turned up key evidence in the ongoing Wall Street insider trading scandal, Tuesday sued the investment banking firm of Goldman, Sachs & Co. for allegedly giving it tainted advice during Pickens' failed takeover attempt.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A criminal insider trading investigation that shook Wall Street in 1987 with the highly publicized arrests of three senior traders ended Thursday with the announcement that one of the men will plead guilty to a single felony count. No charges will be filed against the other two. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan said that Robert M. Freeman, the former head of arbitrage at the investment firm Goldman, Sachs & Co.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In the latest development in Wall Street's insider trading scandal, a federal grand jury on Thursday indicted three top securities traders on multiple felony counts of fraud and conspiracy. The indictment, which was expected, broadens what is known about the federal investigation by asserting for the first time that Goldman, Sachs & Co., which employed one of the defendants, itself profited from the alleged trading scheme.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A criminal insider trading investigation that shook Wall Street in 1987 with the highly publicized arrests of three senior traders ended Thursday with the announcement that one of the men will plead guilty to a single felony count. No charges will be filed against the other two. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan said that Robert M. Freeman, the former head of arbitrage at the investment firm Goldman, Sachs & Co.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Three prominent Wall Street executives, arrested just over two years ago in a dramatic raid by federal agents, seem destined to remain in legal limbo, neither charged nor cleared. Departing from standard procedure in securities fraud cases, federal marshals and postal inspectors, armed with warrants, barged into the offices of two big Wall Street firms on Feb. 12, 1987, and arrested two executives on insider trading charges. Another was seized at his Manhattan apartment.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1987
U.S. District Judge Shirley Wohl Kram denied the motion that accused prosecutors of improperly leaking secret grand jury information to the press. She said defense lawyers failed to prove that the U.S. attorney's office violated a federal rule that generally forbids disclosure of matters before a grand jury. The case involves three Wall Street professionals who were indicted April 9 but who at present do not face criminal charges: Robert M. Freeman, a partner at Goldman, Sachs & Co.; Richard B.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge dismissed insider trading charges against three prominent Wall Street securities traders Tuesday in what was, ironically, a blow to the defendants. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Louis Stanton means that the traders could be reindicted at virtually any time in the next four years, or until the statute of limitations expires on the conspiracy and securities-fraud counts, according to one defense attorney.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for three Wall Street executives accused of insider trading charged Monday that an attempt by federal prosecutors to drop the indictment is an improper tactic designed to win the government time to improve a weak case. The lawyers asked a federal judge to order that a trial based on the indictment begin as scheduled May 26. Alternatively, the defense lawyers asked U.S. District Judge Louis L.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In an apparent setback to the government in a key insider trading case, a federal judge Tuesday rejected a prosecution motion to delay the trial of three Wall Street stock traders for two months. As a result, the trial against Robert M. Freeman, Richard B. Wigton and Timothy L. Tabor is scheduled to begin May 20. U.S. Atty. Rudolph W.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A highly publicized insider trading case that turned into an embarrassment for prosecutors ended Tuesday with the sentencing of Robert M. Freeman, the former head of risk arbitrage at Goldman, Sachs & Co., to four months in prison and a $1-million fine. U.S. District Judge Pierre N. Leval said Freeman's exemplary character and the relatively minor nature of the single charge he pleaded guilty to ordinarily would have led him to allow Freeman to remain free.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In an apparent setback to the government in a key insider trading case, a federal judge Tuesday rejected a prosecution motion to delay the trial of three Wall Street stock traders for two months. As a result, the trial against Robert M. Freeman, Richard B. Wigton and Timothy L. Tabor is scheduled to begin May 20. U.S. Atty. Rudolph W.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Prominent Los Angeles stockbroker Boyd L. Jefferies pleaded guilty Thursday to two federal felony counts, including one charging that he helped stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky break securities laws. Jefferies had disclosed March 19 that he had agreed to plead guilty to the dual counts, to resign the chairmanship of the brokerage he founded and to accept a ban from the securities industry for at least five years.
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