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Robert M Gates

WORLD
February 26, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Monday that the U.S. was still willing to sell Indonesia new weaponry, particularly for its navy and air force. But he cautioned that democracies must have firm civilian control of their militaries, which must be disciplined for human rights abuses. Gates praised Jakarta for moving to professionalize its military, which for decades under former President Suharto ruled the archipelago with an iron fist until the dictator was deposed a decade ago.
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WORLD
February 7, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates denied Wednesday that the Bush administration was seeking a treaty with Iraq that would require long-term security commitments forcing future U.S. presidents to continue sending troops. Instead, Gates told lawmakers, a new agreement with Baghdad would give the U.S. military continuing legal authority to operate in Iraq, much like current United Nations resolutions, which expire at the end of the year.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
If Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates had his way, the protracted presidential nomination battles underway in the Republican and Democratic parties would end sooner rather than later. "Once somebody contemplates the prospect that they may be president of the United States, they're going to begin thinking about what they're going to inherit," Gates said in an interview. "And I think it will be, regardless of party, a sobering realization."
WORLD
January 17, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Dutch Defense Ministry on Wednesday summoned the U.S. ambassador as other American allies denounced criticism of NATO forces in Afghanistan by U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates. The U.S. ambassador, Roland Arnall, met with ministry officials to offer a "clarification of the comments" by Gates, said chief State Department spokesman Sean McCormack.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Monday made his first official visit to Southern California since taking the post, kicking off his second year in office by presenting awards to 17 sailors, including several Navy SEALs, who recently returned from Iraq. Gates spent 141 days on the road last year, mostly on high-profile overseas trips to regional hot spots and world capitals.
WORLD
December 22, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates ruled out a large "surge" of U.S. forces in Afghanistan but said Friday that a small number of additional troops were needed to counter increasing violence and train Afghan forces. "You're talking about probably somewhere in the neighborhood of 7,500 troops," Gates said. "So it's not like moving 100,000 troops from one place to the other or something like that." Commanders in Afghanistan, seeking to augment the 26,000 U.S.
WORLD
December 8, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Despite U.S. intelligence findings that Iran halted its nuclear weapons program four years ago, the Bush administration stepped up its efforts to portray Tehran as a threat, with Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates insisting that the program could be restarted at any time. Gates told a gathering of Middle East leaders here today that the Iranian government remained a source of "instability and chaos" that was still hiding its nuclear ambitions from the international community.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Monday called for a spending increase in the budget of another federal agency, the State Department, to strengthen and rebuild America's ability to ply its "soft power" around the world. In a lecture at Kansas State University, Gates argued that the United States must improve its ability to conduct diplomacy, strategic communications, foreign assistance and economic reconstruction.
WORLD
November 9, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Friday urged the Japanese to take a wider role in world affairs, a position that is controversial here and in other East Asian nations. In an address at Sophia University, a Jesuit institution, Gates said he hoped that Japan would take on more "global security responsibilities" in the year ahead. "Japan has the opportunity -- and an obligation -- to take on a role that reflects its political, economic and military capacity," Gates said.
WORLD
November 6, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
China's military leadership on Monday assured U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates that it opposes a nuclear-armed Iran. But to the disappointment of Pentagon officials, on a visit here for talks on a range of military issues between the two countries, it appears the Chinese position on Iran's nuclear development, for now, will be no more than words.
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