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Robert M Gates

WORLD
October 14, 2007 | David Holley and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice met with Russian human rights activists Saturday in a low-key gathering that seemed designed to provide a gesture of U.S. support without triggering Kremlin anger. The event came the day after Rice and Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates met with President Vladimir V. Putin and other top Russian officials in talks that, at least in public, had frosty overtones. Russia's objection to a planned U.S.
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NATIONAL
October 11, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates said the Army needed more money, not just to make up for the losses suffered in Iraq but also for chronic underfunding since the end of the Cold War. But Gates suggested that rather than using additional money to rebuild conventional war capability, the Army should ensure that it does not again forget the painful lessons it was forced to relearn in Iraq about fighting an insurgency.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2007 | Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writers
Absorbing the lessons of a troubled war, U.S. military officials have begun an intense debate over proposals for a sweeping reorganization of the Army to address shortcomings that have plagued the force in Iraq and to abandon some war-fighting principles that have prevailed since the Cold War. On one side of the widening debate are officers who want many Army units to become specialized, so that entire units or even divisions are dedicated to training foreign militaries.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2007 | Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writers
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has ordered U.S. military commanders in Iraq to crack down on any abuses they uncover by private security contractors in the aftermath of a deadly shooting involving American guards that infuriated Iraqis. Gates took the step after concluding that the thousands of heavily armed private guards in Iraq who work for the Pentagon may not be adequately supervised by military officers.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Friday that he hoped to cut the U.S. force in Iraq to nearly half its current size by the end of 2008, a more dramatic reduction than President Bush endorsed this week and a new indication of divergent viewpoints within the administration and the military. Bush and Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Iraq, proposed modest reductions to bring U.S. troop levels to between 130,000 and 140,000 by July.
WORLD
August 3, 2007 | Peter Spiegel and Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates acknowledged Thursday that the Bush administration underestimated the difficulty of getting a political truce in Iraq, where Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's government has been crippled by a walkout by Sunni Arab ministers. Gates said he was optimistic about military progress in several Iraqi regions, particularly Al Anbar, a western province that was once a haven for insurgents.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2007 | From the Washington Post
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said he was personally engaged in developing contingency plans for a drawdown of U.S. troops from Iraq and emphasized that those efforts were a "priority" for the Pentagon. "Such planning is indeed taking place with my active involvement as well as that of senior military and civilian officials and our commanders in the field," Gates wrote in a letter to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
In choosing to recommend an admiral as the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has for the second time given a high-profile job to someone from the Navy -- a service that has, for the most part, worked only on the fringes of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The choice of Adm. Michael G.
WORLD
June 7, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Under an overcast sky not unlike the morning 63 years ago that Allied forces stormed the Norman beaches below, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Wednesday pointed to their sacrifice to argue that the U.S. and France have long worked together to defeat tyranny and now must do so again. Speaking at the U.S.
WORLD
June 4, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates arrived Sunday evening for his second visit to the Afghan capital since becoming the Pentagon chief, saying that he believes progress is being made in the country, but he wants to ensure there is no slackening of effort. Gates first visited Afghanistan in January, just weeks into his tenure, after which he expressed guarded optimism, saying the situation on the ground was better than he had expected.
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