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Robert M Gates

NATIONAL
November 27, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Monday called for a spending increase in the budget of another federal agency, the State Department, to strengthen and rebuild America's ability to ply its "soft power" around the world. In a lecture at Kansas State University, Gates argued that the United States must improve its ability to conduct diplomacy, strategic communications, foreign assistance and economic reconstruction.
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WORLD
November 9, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Friday urged the Japanese to take a wider role in world affairs, a position that is controversial here and in other East Asian nations. In an address at Sophia University, a Jesuit institution, Gates said he hoped that Japan would take on more "global security responsibilities" in the year ahead. "Japan has the opportunity -- and an obligation -- to take on a role that reflects its political, economic and military capacity," Gates said.
WORLD
November 6, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
China's military leadership on Monday assured U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates that it opposes a nuclear-armed Iran. But to the disappointment of Pentagon officials, on a visit here for talks on a range of military issues between the two countries, it appears the Chinese position on Iran's nuclear development, for now, will be no more than words.
WORLD
November 5, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates arrived in China on Sunday, intending to question top Chinese officials about the purpose of their military buildup and pressure them to stop providing arms to Iran. Pentagon officials have accused China of supplying missile technology to Iran. They have also suggested that more mundane conventional arms designed or built by China have been smuggled by Iran into Iraq and Afghanistan. Chinese officials are well aware of U.S.
WORLD
October 14, 2007 | David Holley and Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writers
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice met with Russian human rights activists Saturday in a low-key gathering that seemed designed to provide a gesture of U.S. support without triggering Kremlin anger. The event came the day after Rice and Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates met with President Vladimir V. Putin and other top Russian officials in talks that, at least in public, had frosty overtones. Russia's objection to a planned U.S.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates said the Army needed more money, not just to make up for the losses suffered in Iraq but also for chronic underfunding since the end of the Cold War. But Gates suggested that rather than using additional money to rebuild conventional war capability, the Army should ensure that it does not again forget the painful lessons it was forced to relearn in Iraq about fighting an insurgency.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2007 | Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writers
Absorbing the lessons of a troubled war, U.S. military officials have begun an intense debate over proposals for a sweeping reorganization of the Army to address shortcomings that have plagued the force in Iraq and to abandon some war-fighting principles that have prevailed since the Cold War. On one side of the widening debate are officers who want many Army units to become specialized, so that entire units or even divisions are dedicated to training foreign militaries.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2007 | Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writers
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has ordered U.S. military commanders in Iraq to crack down on any abuses they uncover by private security contractors in the aftermath of a deadly shooting involving American guards that infuriated Iraqis. Gates took the step after concluding that the thousands of heavily armed private guards in Iraq who work for the Pentagon may not be adequately supervised by military officers.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Friday that he hoped to cut the U.S. force in Iraq to nearly half its current size by the end of 2008, a more dramatic reduction than President Bush endorsed this week and a new indication of divergent viewpoints within the administration and the military. Bush and Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Iraq, proposed modest reductions to bring U.S. troop levels to between 130,000 and 140,000 by July.
WORLD
August 3, 2007 | Peter Spiegel and Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates acknowledged Thursday that the Bush administration underestimated the difficulty of getting a political truce in Iraq, where Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's government has been crippled by a walkout by Sunni Arab ministers. Gates said he was optimistic about military progress in several Iraqi regions, particularly Al Anbar, a western province that was once a haven for insurgents.
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