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Robert M Gintel

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BUSINESS
May 21, 1990 | LANCE IGNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his role as chief executive of three mutual funds, Robert M. Gintel has peered into an open-pit copper mine in Arizona, strolled the deck of an offshore oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico and driven an air-conditioned tractor around a parking lot in Moline, Ill. Gintel likes a firsthand look at the merchandise before he buys.
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BUSINESS
May 21, 1990 | LANCE IGNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his role as chief executive of three mutual funds, Robert M. Gintel has peered into an open-pit copper mine in Arizona, strolled the deck of an offshore oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico and driven an air-conditioned tractor around a parking lot in Moline, Ill. Gintel likes a firsthand look at the merchandise before he buys.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Invoking the cause of corporate democracy, New York investor Martin E. Tash and his backers last month gained control of the board of directors of Gradco Systems Inc. by winning the hearts and minds of shareholders in a contentious proxy fight. Two months earlier at Comprehensive Care Corp., a group including a former company executive from Orange County waged a successful proxy battle, gaining control of the St. Louis-based company's board and ousting the chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Invoking the cause of corporate democracy, New York investor Martin E. Tash and his backers last month won control of the board of Gradco Systems Inc. by winning the hearts and minds of shareholders of the Irvine-based maker of copier and printer sorter equipment in a contentious proxy fight. Two months earlier, at Comprehensive Care Corp.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1994 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On trading desks across the country, the video screens of Nasdaq computer terminals glow with stock symbols and price quotes, displaying the list of market makers who deal in each stock and the prices at which they stand ready to buy or sell shares. Federal regulation--what's known as the "firm quote rule"--requires market makers to honor the prices they display. But Nasdaq market makers often do not. Through Oct.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the morning sun lifts above the hills east of this town near the Hudson River, Harvey Houtkin, principal and chief executive officer of tiny Domestic Securities Inc., sits before a Nasdaq trading terminal, steeling himself to do the unthinkable. Houtkin taps a few buttons on a keyboard linked to the central computer for over-the-counter stock trading. "What I'm doing now is the most unacceptable thing you can do in the market," he says.
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