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Robert M Greber

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BUSINESS
July 7, 1995
Robert M. Greber, 57, has been elected chairman and chief executive of the Pacific Stock Exchange and will succeed current Chief Executive Leopold Korins on Jan. 25. Greber has been president and chief operating officer of the exchange since 1992; he joined it in 1990 as executive vice president of marketing and strategic planning. "Bob isn't simply the logical candidate for this job, he's the best candidate," Korins said Wednesday as the board of governors announced Greber's election.
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BUSINESS
July 7, 1995
Robert M. Greber, 57, has been elected chairman and chief executive of the Pacific Stock Exchange and will succeed current Chief Executive Leopold Korins on Jan. 25. Greber has been president and chief operating officer of the exchange since 1992; he joined it in 1990 as executive vice president of marketing and strategic planning. "Bob isn't simply the logical candidate for this job, he's the best candidate," Korins said Wednesday as the board of governors announced Greber's election.
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BUSINESS
February 23, 1988
Robert M. Greber has been named a partner in Leon A. Farley Associates, a senior-level executive search firm in San Francisco. Greber was previously president and chief executive of Lucasfilm Ltd. and, most recently, president and chief executive of Diagnostic Networks Inc.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Pacific Stock Exchange named Robert M. Greber chairman and chief executive to succeed Lee Korins, who stepped down. . . . Calabasas-based networking equipment maker Xylan Corp. filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission for an initial public offering of 4.2 million common shares.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1999 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Executives at the Pacific Exchange on Friday called the Chicago Board Options Exchange's surprise decision to terminate the planned merger between the two "stunning and shortsighted," and said PCX will continue to consider other alliances. The two exchanges said in late July that they would merge into the world's largest trader of options, which are contracts that allow investors to make bets on stocks or hedge their positions.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1996
The Treasury Department's recent announcement that it will issue inflation-proof bonds next year is stirring excitement among a normally staid cast of characters: managers of bond mutual funds. Already, some mutual funds hold foreign IOUs whose returns are adjusted with the level of consumer prices in those countries. With the Treasury joining the bandwagon, the inflation-indexed concept will get a big boost, possibly spilling over into the corporate and municipal debt sectors.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With surprisingly little fanfare, the Dow Jones industrial average closed above 3,000 Wednesday for the first time in history. Traders, who had broken out champagne bottles nearly a year ago in hopes of passing this milestone, said the advance reflected greater investor confidence that an economic recovery is on the way. During the day, the Dow index of 30 industrial stocks bobbed up and back several times across the threshold before finally settling at 3,004.46, up 17.58 from Tuesday's close.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1998 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confirming weeks of speculation, the Pacific Exchange and the Chicago Board Options Exchange said Thursday they have agreed to combine into one market that will handle the bulk of the nation's trading in stock option contracts. And as expected, the deal puts in jeopardy the future of the Pacific's downtown Los Angeles trading floor, as the new entity chooses to focus on the more lucrative options business.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1998 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confirming weeks of speculation, the Pacific Exchange and the Chicago Board Options Exchange said Thursday they have agreed to combine into one market that will handle the bulk of the nation's trading in stock option contracts. And, as expected, the deal puts in jeopardy the future of the Pacific's downtown Los Angeles stock-trading floor, as the new entity chooses to focus on the more lucrative options business.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1998 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Francisco and Los Angeles have housed vibrant stock exchange floors since the 19th century, but they may not make it into the 21st. When board members of the Pacific Exchange meet in Carmel on Tuesday, they are expected to discuss whether a possible merger with the Chicago Board Options Exchange could mean spinning off the Pacific's equity business and closing its two stock trading floors, those familiar with the talks said.
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