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Robert M Solow

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BUSINESS
May 17, 1988 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Robert M. Solow, the 1987 Nobel laureate in economics, said Monday that it is extremely likely Congress will raise taxes to reduce the budget deficit next year, and he criticized Vice President George Bush, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, for ruling out a tax hike. "All we've got out of Bush is, 'I will not raise taxes--period.' And the only sensible word in that sentence is 'period,' " the Brooklyn native said in an interview. "I keep telling myself he must know better.
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BOOKS
June 4, 1989 | Warren Bennis, Bennis is Distinguished Professor of Business Administration at USC and the author of "Why Leaders Can't Lead." and
There is an old Zen saying: First enlightenment, then the laundry. Measured by both the number of books sold and the quality of the recommendations therein, the '80s must qualify as a decade of enlightenment for American management. Even so, "Made in America" contributes its share. Written by an all-star lineup of MIT faculty, the book illuminates our No. 1 economic problem: the seriously declining rate of manufacturing productivity. In the long run, the American standard of living depends on productivity, on the amount of goods and services we produce with the available work force.
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BOOKS
June 4, 1989 | Warren Bennis, Bennis is Distinguished Professor of Business Administration at USC and the author of "Why Leaders Can't Lead." and
There is an old Zen saying: First enlightenment, then the laundry. Measured by both the number of books sold and the quality of the recommendations therein, the '80s must qualify as a decade of enlightenment for American management. Even so, "Made in America" contributes its share. Written by an all-star lineup of MIT faculty, the book illuminates our No. 1 economic problem: the seriously declining rate of manufacturing productivity. In the long run, the American standard of living depends on productivity, on the amount of goods and services we produce with the available work force.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1988 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Robert M. Solow, the 1987 Nobel laureate in economics, said Monday that it is extremely likely Congress will raise taxes to reduce the budget deficit next year, and he criticized Vice President George Bush, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, for ruling out a tax hike. "All we've got out of Bush is, 'I will not raise taxes--period.' And the only sensible word in that sentence is 'period,' " the Brooklyn native said in an interview. "I keep telling myself he must know better.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1994 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobel laureate economist Robert M. Solow said Thursday that fears that the costs in President Clinton's health care proposals would cripple small businesses are exaggerated, even as the Clinton Administration seemed to be backpedaling on the issue. Solow said there would be an adverse impact on small businesses, but he suggested it would be short-lived as the new system took effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Dorfman, 85, a Harvard University professor respected for his contributions to linear programming and environmental economics, died Monday at his home in Belmont, Mass. An aspiring poet in his youth, he was known to colleagues for the clarity and grace of his writing about complex topics such as linear models of production and economic history. He was a co-author, with Nobel Laureate Robert M. Solow and economist Paul A. Samuelson, of 1958's "Linear Programming and Economic Analysis."
NEWS
December 15, 1992
We all face the same problems, whether you are a very large corporation or a very small company such as mine . . . employee problems, health insurance problems, transportation problems, the whole gamut. Kathleen Piper, who runs the Pied Piper Flower Shop, Yankton, S.D. * This is not just a short-term glitch. Without a strong recovery, it will be a lot harder to solve the long-run problems of the economy. Robert M.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
American Robert M. Solow, a Keynesian economist sharply at odds with President Reagan's free-market policies, today won the Nobel Prize in economics. Solow, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was cited for publishing a mathematical formula in 1956 "describing how increased capital stock generates greater per capita production." The 63-year-old Solow, who was an adviser to Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B.
NEWS
December 11, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
President Oscar Arias Sanchez of Costa Rica accepted the 1987 Nobel Peace Prize on Thursday, urging the superpowers to stop meddling in Central America and let the region solve its own problems. "If they cannot refrain from amassing weapons of war, then in the name of God, at least they should leave us in peace," Arias said in his speech accepting the prize, which includes a 23-carat Nobel medallion and a monetary award valued at about $350,000.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Better on-the-job training, even more than better schools, is the key to helping U.S. workers catch up to the Japanese and others in productivity, concluded an MIT report released Tuesday. "Young Americans receive most of their job skills in institutions of formal learning, and what they pick up on the job is usually of a limited nature, gathered from watching a colleague," said the report, "Made in America." Taking only small or partial steps to improve the nation's competitiveness will doom the United States to steady slippage in the standard of living, according to the two-year study by scientists, engineers and economists from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1987 | Associated Press
American Robert M. Solow, the Nobel laureate for economics, said Monday that the U.S. dollar is still searching for its proper value and is likely to continue falling. Solow, honored for his theories of economic growth, also said America's trading partners should expand their economies to help the United States resolve its trade imbalance.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 81-year-old economist from the University of Chicago, whose Depression-era tour of American factories led him to discover that it costs money to bargain over any transaction, was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics on Tuesday. The theories developed by British-born Ronald Coase, a professor emeritus at the university's law school, were described by the Nobel committee as the economic equivalent of discovering new particles of matter.
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