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Robert M Teeter

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NEWS
November 2, 1992 | From Times Staff Writers
MAGIC NUMBER: For all the sophistication of modern campaigns, the strategy behind them often can be easily boiled down. For Bush, it is a number: 270. . . . A plaque on the desk of Bush campaign manager Robert M. Teeter has made sure the figure--the bare minimum of electoral votes needed to win the presidency--is never far from the mind of the Republican team.
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NEWS
November 2, 1992 | From Times Staff Writers
MAGIC NUMBER: For all the sophistication of modern campaigns, the strategy behind them often can be easily boiled down. For Bush, it is a number: 270. . . . A plaque on the desk of Bush campaign manager Robert M. Teeter has made sure the figure--the bare minimum of electoral votes needed to win the presidency--is never far from the mind of the Republican team.
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NEWS
February 10, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At headquarters, the political heavies are sniping. Out on the campaign trail, field workers complain they are not seeing enough of the candidate. And the candidate himself, when he does take to the stump, gets such shortsighted help from the staff that he goes into a routine visit to a grocers' convention and comes out portrayed as a man amazed at the electronic wonders of an ordinary supermarket.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At headquarters, the political heavies are sniping. Out on the campaign trail, field workers complain they are not seeing enough of the candidate. And the candidate himself, when he does take to the stump, gets such shortsighted help from the staff that he goes into a routine visit to a grocers' convention and comes out portrayed as a man amazed at the electronic wonders of an ordinary supermarket.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dan Quayle for six months waged a quiet campaign to get George Bush to choose him as a running mate in 1988, the Washington Post quoted the vice president as saying. Quayle told the newspaper: "You don't run for vice president, but . . . there are ways you can be put on the 'available' chart. . . . You keep expectations down and do things as quietly and subtly as possible."
NEWS
July 14, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
In contrast to the hoopla in New York, President Bush spent the day at his seaside home here in quiet consultation with Robert M. Teeter, his campaign chairman, and with White House Chief of Staff Samuel K. Skinner, who flew to Maine for the day.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | President Bush's top political and policy advisers are already in place, often moving within his Administration or his campaign. Here are a few of them:
JAMES A. BAKER III White House chief of staff James A. Baker III has ties to Bush that go back to the early 1960s when the two Houstonians were first getting involved in politics. He ran Bush's 1968 congressional campaign, and has been at or near the helm of every Republican presidential campaign since 1976.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | From Associated Press
George Bush concluded that Dan Quayle was hurting his bid to be reelected President but refused to force him off the ticket, according to a new book excerpted in Newsweek. The book, "Quest for the Presidency 1992," includes quotes from unidentified sources who discuss what Bush said and thought during the campaign. "Quayle had become the mouthpiece for the party's farther right," Bush thought, and pressure was heavy to push him out, according to excerpts in the Oct. 24 issue.
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The way the Bush campaign sees it, the new television ad being broadcast by Bill Clinton's campaign is more than fuzzy and warm pictures of small-town America and beaming children. It is, rather, rife with misleading accounts of Clinton's governorship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1992 | ANN BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's reelection campaign managers have yet to say whether he will join a debate with Democrat Bill Clinton in San Diego this Sunday. Plans for the University of San Diego to host a nationally televised debate are on hold until this afternoon, when a representative of the bipartisan commission trying to bring the debate together is expected to give the word, said Jack Cannon, USD public relations officer. Earlier this month Bush's campaign chairman, Robert M.
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