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Robert M Wurzelbacher

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BUSINESS
December 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Keating Aide Sent to Prison: A son-in-law of convicted Lincoln Savings & Loan operator Charles H. Keating Jr. was sentenced to 40 months in federal prison. He had pleaded guilty to three charges of misapplying $13.9 million of the failed Irvine thrift's insured deposits. Robert M. Wurzelbacher Jr., one of Keating's five sons-in-law, will be eligible for parole immediately but will probably serve at least 26 months, said his lawyer, Mark E. Beck.
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BUSINESS
December 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Keating Aide Sent to Prison: A son-in-law of convicted Lincoln Savings & Loan operator Charles H. Keating Jr. was sentenced to 40 months in federal prison. He had pleaded guilty to three charges of misapplying $13.9 million of the failed Irvine thrift's insured deposits. Robert M. Wurzelbacher Jr., one of Keating's five sons-in-law, will be eligible for parole immediately but will probably serve at least 26 months, said his lawyer, Mark E. Beck.
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BUSINESS
August 25, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert M. Wurzelbacher Jr., son-in-law of convicted thrift operator Charles H. Keating Jr., agreed not to violate securities law in the future as part of his settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the federal agency said Monday. Wurzelbacher is the fourth of 10 executives and Keating business associates sued by the SEC last December to settle allegations of fraudulently inflating profits at American Continental Corp. and its Lincoln Savings & Loan subsidiary.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving with surprising swiftness, federal prosecutors concluded their case Tuesday against Charles H. Keating Jr., paving the way for the former operator of Lincoln Savings & Loan to put on his first defense to charges that he looted the Irvine thrift. Defense testimony is scheduled to begin today in U.S. District Court here with Robert M. Wurzelbacher Jr., a Keating son-in-law and top aide, taking the stand. Defense lawyer Stephen C. Neal wouldn't say whether Keating himself would testify.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving with surprising swiftness, federal prosecutors concluded their case Tuesday against Charles H. Keating Jr., paving the way for the former operator of Lincoln Savings & Loan to put on his first defense to charges that he swindled the Irvine thrift. Defense testimony is scheduled to begin today in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles with Robert M. Wurzelbacher Jr., a Keating son-in-law and top aide, taking the stand. Defense lawyer Stephen C.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of Charles H. Keating Jr.'s sons-in-law and two other associates in Lincoln Savings & Loan have agreed to pay a record restitution of $75 million to settle civil charges relating to the thrift's failure, regulators said Tuesday. The money may never be collected, however, because the four say they're broke. Any funds collected will go to the Resolution Trust Corp., the government's S&L cleanup agency, to partially compensate taxpayers for their losses in bailing out Lincoln.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving with surprising swiftness, federal prosecutors concluded their case Tuesday against Charles H. Keating Jr., paving the way for the former operator of Lincoln Savings & Loan to put on his first defense to charges that he looted the Irvine thrift. Defense testimony is scheduled to begin today in U.S. District Court here with Robert M. Wurzelbacher Jr., a Keating son-in-law and top aide, taking the stand. Defense lawyer Stephen C. Neal wouldn't say whether Keating himself would testify.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Keating Loses Bid for Mid-Trial Acquittal: A federal judge, ruling after the prosecution rested in Charles H. Keating Jr.'s conspiracy, fraud and racketeering trial, rejected a defense request to clear the former Lincoln Savings & Loan operator and his son of all charges. But U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer said she had "some doubt" about three counts of bankruptcy fraud and might rule differently after the defense presents its side of the case. The first defense witness was Robert M.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | From Associated Press
Charles H. Keating Jr. was the first of 10 defendants to be sentenced in the federal criminal case stemming from the collapse of his Lincoln Savings & Loan. His son, Charles H. Keating III, was convicted on 65 counts of racketeering, conspiracy and fraud along with his father, and faces sentencing July 23. Eight other Keating associates and officials of Lincoln and its parent company, American Continental Corp., pleaded guilty in deals with prosecutors. Except for son-in-law Robert M.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors and Charles H. Keating Jr. finally reached a written agreement that the former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner will not claim that he received an unfair trial on racketeering and other criminal charges because his lawyer once represented two co-defendants, according to documents filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court. Keating and two other defendants--his son, Charles H. Keating III, and a son-in-law, Robert M. Wurzelbacher Jr.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving with surprising swiftness, federal prosecutors concluded their case Tuesday against Charles H. Keating Jr., paving the way for the former operator of Lincoln Savings & Loan to put on his first defense to charges that he swindled the Irvine thrift. Defense testimony is scheduled to begin today in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles with Robert M. Wurzelbacher Jr., a Keating son-in-law and top aide, taking the stand. Defense lawyer Stephen C.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of Charles H. Keating Jr.'s sons-in-law and two other associates in Lincoln Savings & Loan have agreed to pay a record restitution of $75 million to settle civil charges relating to the thrift's failure, regulators said Tuesday. The money may never be collected, however, because the four say they're broke. Any funds collected will go to the Resolution Trust Corp., the government's S&L cleanup agency, to partially compensate taxpayers for their losses in bailing out Lincoln.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert M. Wurzelbacher Jr., son-in-law of convicted thrift operator Charles H. Keating Jr., agreed not to violate securities law in the future as part of his settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the federal agency said Monday. Wurzelbacher is the fourth of 10 executives and Keating business associates sued by the SEC last December to settle allegations of fraudulently inflating profits at American Continental Corp. and its Lincoln Savings & Loan subsidiary.
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