Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Macnaughton
IN THE NEWS

Robert Macnaughton

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
"Success doesn't stick on you forever," actor Robert Macnaughton announced, "but the same questions (about it) do." It's been 5 1/2 years since the release of "E.T."--in which Macnaughton played the older brother--but public curiosity is still high: "The first thing people always ask is, 'What was it like working with Steven Spielberg?' I say, 'It was really great.' Or sometimes I substitute 'fun.' Or 'inspiring.' The second question is, 'Was Drew Barrymore a brat?' The answer is no."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
"Success doesn't stick on you forever," actor Robert Macnaughton announced, "but the same questions (about it) do." It's been 5 1/2 years since the release of "E.T."--in which Macnaughton played the older brother--but public curiosity is still high: "The first thing people always ask is, 'What was it like working with Steven Spielberg?' I say, 'It was really great.' Or sometimes I substitute 'fun.' Or 'inspiring.' The second question is, 'Was Drew Barrymore a brat?' The answer is no."
Advertisement
NEWS
February 21, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
An infant girl was born without a brain at a Texas Air Force hospital Saturday morning and was prepared for transfer to Loma Linda University Medical Center in California to become the second infant in a controversial program that harvests organs for transplants. Baby Evelyn, the daughter of Airman 1st Class Todd Keys and his wife, Judy, was born anencephalic--with a brain stem but without the two cerebral hemispheres--at 12:15 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Enthusiasm. If stage artists don't have it and send it out, audiences won't pick it up. What audiences will drop faster than you can say "Equity Waiver" is forced, calculated enthusiasm--that byproduct of desperation that was palpable almost anywhere you looked in smaller theater this year. You could hear it approaching the box office: Love us, please . The plea is especially loud if you're a critic and the theater depends on your review.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Runski! Hideski! Every theater has the right to get silly once in a while, but South Coast Repertory is really pushing it with "The Foreigner." Now, I admit it. I laughed when the shy Englishman who pretends not to have any English (Jeffrey Alan Chandler) scares off the thug from the Ku Klux Klan (Art Koustik) by further pretending to be Count Dracula. But then I laugh at anybody's Count Dracula imitation, including my own.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1987 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Until I saw David French's "Jitters," I never knew that Toronto theater reviews are written right after the show for the next morning's paper. If "Jitters" had a subtitle, it would be "Everything You Always Wanted to Know About the Theater, But Were Afraid to Ask." At times, "Jitters" (at the Gnu) achieves such a documentary vitality in depicting the pressures of a theater opening that it almost makes you forget the nonsense that French lets in. That review, for instance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
"Success doesn't stick on you forever," actor Robert Macnaughton announced, "but the same questions (about it) do." It's been 5 1/2 years since the release of "E.T."--in which Macnaughton, who grew up in Irvine, played the older brother--but public curiosity is still high: "The first thing people always ask is, 'What was it like working with Steven Spielberg?' I say, 'It was really great.' Or sometimes I substitute 'fun.' Or 'inspiring.' The second question is, 'Was Drew Barrymore a brat?'
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | DOUG CONNER and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Memories of the clean-cut young man who checked out of Room 102 on Monday will always remind Arnold's Motel manager Marlene Anderson that it is what you do not see in people that can pose the greatest threat. Dean A. Mellberg, 20, was calm, even pleasant, Anderson said, when she upbraided him for being late in paying his bill and checking out that day.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1985 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
'I don't suppose I will ever deal with the shame that overwhelmed me the second after I had done that," said Athol Fugard, recalling an afternoon in his South African boyhood when he rode up on a bicycle behind his black friend and mentor, Sam Semela, called out Semela's name and spat in his face. "Master Harold . . . and the Boys" at the South Coast Repertory represents Fugard's attempt to come to grips with that shame, the memory of which remained buried in him for 40 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1985 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
Sitting on the floor in his family's Irvine home one recent afternoon, Robert Macnaughton looked much the way he did three years ago in "E.T.," Hollywood's all-time blockbuster movie. At 18, he may be taller, more gangling, his expression more intense, but he has the same tousle-haired, toothy look as when he played the older brother, Michael, in Steven Spielberg's tale of childhood visions. "It (the film) was a terrific break for me.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It's time to bring out your handkerchiefs: The little alien who just wanted to phone home is back. On Thursday at the Samuel Goldwyn Theatre, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is presenting a 25th-anniversary screening featuring an onstage cast-and-crew reunion of Steven Spielberg's beloved fantasy "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|