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Robert Martin

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OPINION
January 22, 2004
I have seen the terrorists, and they are us. The Jan. 21 California section lists eight murders and a kidnapping on our local streets. Why are we going halfway across the world to fight suspected terrorists in Iraq when we can sit in our living rooms and see them? Robert Martin Rancho Palos Verdes
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OPINION
January 22, 2004
I have seen the terrorists, and they are us. The Jan. 21 California section lists eight murders and a kidnapping on our local streets. Why are we going halfway across the world to fight suspected terrorists in Iraq when we can sit in our living rooms and see them? Robert Martin Rancho Palos Verdes
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1995
Re "Preservation Group Wants Just Dessert," Aug. 15: The story stated that the inscription on the historic 1880s Pasadena building read " 'My people are the people of the desert,' said T.E. Lawrence, as he picked up his fork." Before the earthquake tore off the first line of the quote, it actually read " 'My people are the people of the dessert,' said T.E. Lawrence, picking up his fork." Please note that it was spelled "dessert" rather then "desert" in the phrase. Thus, the play on words.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1997
Re "Strangling Africa's Regal Lake," Oct. 28: Why can't the African governments kill two birds with one stone. Don't manatees eat water hyacinths? Since they are an endangered species here, why not study the environmental impact of transplanting a few there to reproduce and take care of the hyacinths and also bring an endangered species back from possible extinction? ROBERT MARTIN Victorville
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1997
Re "Strangling Africa's Regal Lake," Oct. 28: Why can't the African governments kill two birds with one stone. Don't manatees eat water hyacinths? Since they are an endangered species here, why not study the environmental impact of transplanting a few there to reproduce and take care of the hyacinths and also bring an endangered species back from possible extinction? ROBERT MARTIN Victorville
NEWS
January 5, 1987 | United Press International
A second child died and his parents remained hospitalized Sunday as authorities considered filing charges of criminally negligent homicide against a snowmobile operator who ran them down while they played in the snow. William Nietch, 6, died at Benedictine Hospital in Kingston Sunday from injuries suffered in the collision that killed his younger half-brother. Authorities said a snowmobile driven by Harry F. Davis, 22, of Accord, ran over a toboggan being pulled by Robert Martin, 36.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1986 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Robert Martin may have retired from the Sequoia Quartet, but that, happily, hasn't interfered with his impulse to play chamber music. Sunday, the cellist and his friend of 25 years, Miwako Watanabe (the Sequoians' second violin), joined pianist Antoinette Perry for an afternoon of Beethoven at Gindi Auditorium. It was a superb performance of great music, the kind that makes a listener glad to be alive and receiving such a gift.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1988 | TERRY McQUILKIN
The third concert in the "Music for Mischa" series was devoted to one composer, and featured only one other performer in addition to cellist and series producer Robert Martin, who performs on each of the four programs. Collaborating with his fellow Curtis Institute alumnus, pianist Richard Goode presented a rather serious Beethoven program Tuesday evening at Gindi Auditorium. Expansive and daunting for performer and listener, the "Hammerklavier" Sonata makes for a heady recital-opener.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
Intermission seemed to make the difference at Gindi Auditorium on Tuesday evening. For whatever reason, after the break violinist Miwako Watanabe, cellist Robert Martin and pianist Antoinette Perry completely turned around a previously lackluster concert. The program--the second in the series dedicated to the memory of cellist Mischa Schneider--ended with Schubert's Trio in E-flat, Opus 100. A characteristically spacious, lyrical work, it is not quite as popular as his B-flat Trio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1995
The federal government shut down [for a week]. The only category spared the financial ax during this period was "essential" services. That included Social Security payments, welfare, etc. Not surprisingly, a little-known "essential" service was Congress' paycheck. The Republicans and Democrats have embroiled themselves in the worst party bickering and catcall blabbering. They obviously were not doing their jobs effectively, yet they got paid. Why? In the private sector, if two co-workers were unable to accomplish a required task due to disagreements, consider what would happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1995
The federal government shut down [for a week]. The only category spared the financial ax during this period was "essential" services. That included Social Security payments, welfare, etc. Not surprisingly, a little-known "essential" service was Congress' paycheck. The Republicans and Democrats have embroiled themselves in the worst party bickering and catcall blabbering. They obviously were not doing their jobs effectively, yet they got paid. Why? In the private sector, if two co-workers were unable to accomplish a required task due to disagreements, consider what would happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1995
Re "Preservation Group Wants Just Dessert," Aug. 15: The story stated that the inscription on the historic 1880s Pasadena building read " 'My people are the people of the desert,' said T.E. Lawrence, as he picked up his fork." Before the earthquake tore off the first line of the quote, it actually read " 'My people are the people of the dessert,' said T.E. Lawrence, picking up his fork." Please note that it was spelled "dessert" rather then "desert" in the phrase. Thus, the play on words.
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not easy for a literary biographer to pin down what makes a writer great. Biographers often recount the details of writers' lives without facing up to the very tough question of what it is that makes their subjects worth writing about. In this life of one of the saddest and oddest of a sad and odd crowd--the late-Victorian poets--Robert Bernard Martin, in a very subtle way, defines what makes Gerard Manley Hopkins great.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1988 | TERRY McQUILKIN
The third concert in the "Music for Mischa" series was devoted to one composer, and featured only one other performer in addition to cellist and series producer Robert Martin, who performs on each of the four programs. Collaborating with his fellow Curtis Institute alumnus, pianist Richard Goode presented a rather serious Beethoven program Tuesday evening at Gindi Auditorium. Expansive and daunting for performer and listener, the "Hammerklavier" Sonata makes for a heady recital-opener.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
Intermission seemed to make the difference at Gindi Auditorium on Tuesday evening. For whatever reason, after the break violinist Miwako Watanabe, cellist Robert Martin and pianist Antoinette Perry completely turned around a previously lackluster concert. The program--the second in the series dedicated to the memory of cellist Mischa Schneider--ended with Schubert's Trio in E-flat, Opus 100. A characteristically spacious, lyrical work, it is not quite as popular as his B-flat Trio.
BOOKS
August 9, 1987 | John Espey
The potential victim in this elegantly constructed winner of the "Best First Private Eye Novel" contest is Buck Weldon, creator of a he-man investigator, Bart Steele. The best-selling volumes of Steele's adventures have made Weldon wealthy. He lives in the San Fernando Valley and enjoys connections with the film world. Through an instance of mistaken identity, a series of murders is triggered, and one of Buck's daughters hires her own detective, Saxon, to keep an eye on her father.
BOOKS
August 9, 1987 | John Espey
The potential victim in this elegantly constructed winner of the "Best First Private Eye Novel" contest is Buck Weldon, creator of a he-man investigator, Bart Steele. The best-selling volumes of Steele's adventures have made Weldon wealthy. He lives in the San Fernando Valley and enjoys connections with the film world. Through an instance of mistaken identity, a series of murders is triggered, and one of Buck's daughters hires her own detective, Saxon, to keep an eye on her father.
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not easy for a literary biographer to pin down what makes a writer great. Biographers often recount the details of writers' lives without facing up to the very tough question of what it is that makes their subjects worth writing about. In this life of one of the saddest and oddest of a sad and odd crowd--the late-Victorian poets--Robert Bernard Martin, in a very subtle way, defines what makes Gerard Manley Hopkins great.
NEWS
January 5, 1987 | United Press International
A second child died and his parents remained hospitalized Sunday as authorities considered filing charges of criminally negligent homicide against a snowmobile operator who ran them down while they played in the snow. William Nietch, 6, died at Benedictine Hospital in Kingston Sunday from injuries suffered in the collision that killed his younger half-brother. Authorities said a snowmobile driven by Harry F. Davis, 22, of Accord, ran over a toboggan being pulled by Robert Martin, 36.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1986 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Robert Martin may have retired from the Sequoia Quartet, but that, happily, hasn't interfered with his impulse to play chamber music. Sunday, the cellist and his friend of 25 years, Miwako Watanabe (the Sequoians' second violin), joined pianist Antoinette Perry for an afternoon of Beethoven at Gindi Auditorium. It was a superb performance of great music, the kind that makes a listener glad to be alive and receiving such a gift.
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