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Robert Maurer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992 | LEN HALL
After 14 years and $800,000 in city expense, the Battle of Porcupine Hill is over. The City Council voted 3 to 2 Tuesday night to give up the fight to save a ridgeline and to allow developer Robert Maurer to build his dream home on a hill overlooking Capistrano Valley. Tuesday's vote followed more than five hours of negotiations last Friday conducted by Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert O. Frazee. "It was time to have the issue settled," Councilman Gary L. Hausdorfer said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992 | LEN HALL
After 14 years and $800,000 in city expense, the Battle of Porcupine Hill is over. The City Council voted 3 to 2 Tuesday night to give up the fight to save a ridgeline and to allow developer Robert Maurer to build his dream home on a hill overlooking Capistrano Valley. Tuesday's vote followed more than five hours of negotiations last Friday conducted by Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert O. Frazee. "It was time to have the issue settled," Councilman Gary L. Hausdorfer said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1991 | WENDY PAULSON
Overriding the city planning director, the City Council this week voted to allow a landowner to proceed with plans to build a 15,000-square-foot structure on a hilltop. The unanimous vote upheld an appeal by landowner and developer Robert Maurer, who owns the highly visible 42 acres, which are subject to an ordinance prohibiting ridgeline development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1991 | LEN HALL
The Battle of Porcupine Hill goes on. Hope of ending the costly legal dispute over the hill, nicknamed for its 87 protruding date palms, were dashed Tuesday when the City Council walked out of a special closed-door meeting with no agreement. "The bottom line is that we decided it was not appropriate to take any action until we seat a new council member," said Mayor Kenneth E. Friess, alluding to the resignation of City Councilman Lawrence F. Buchheim, which is effective Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1991 | LEN HALL
The Battle of Porcupine Hill goes on. Hope of ending the costly legal dispute over the hill, nicknamed for its 87 protruding date palms, were dashed Tuesday when the City Council walked out of a special closed-door meeting with no agreement. "The bottom line is that we decided it was not appropriate to take any action until we seat a new council member," said Mayor Kenneth E. Friess, alluding to the resignation of City Councilman Lawrence F. Buchheim, which is effective Sunday.
MAGAZINE
September 29, 1991 | R. Daniel Foster, EDITED BY MARY McNAMARA
Next time someone wails, "Is there a doctor in the house?" don't be surprised if Dr. Robert Maurer steps out of the wings. But forget the woman giving birth in the audience--Maurer is more likely to leap on stage to figure out why Willy Loman refuses to die. Brooklyn-born Maurer, 44, is director of behavioral sciences for the Family Practice Residency program at Santa Monica Hospital--a front job for his true passion: counseling testy troupers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Deborah Stack was caught in the middle of a real emotional storm. Actors in the long-running hit show "Tamara" wanted time off for TV and film jobs, but general manager Stack usually had to play the heavy and tell them "no"--the show had to go on. As might be expected, that made some people in the "Tamara" family pretty unhappy. It was clearly another case for the theater shrink.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A man who claimed he received shoddy treatment for a spinal injury at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center will receive $890,000 under a settlement approved Tuesday. The county Board of Supervisors voted to approve the settlement of a medical malpractice lawsuit brought by Robert Maurer, 35, who now lives in a nursing facility. He was injured in a January 2004 traffic accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA
An appeal by a liquor store owner to save a 32-foot-tall sign has been rejected by the City Council Because the sign existed before the city sign ordinance was passed in 1990, property owner Robert Maurer argued, it should not be affected. Maurer will be given three years to take down the sign, which bears the simple message: "Liquor." Another 18-foot sign on the same property must be down within two years, the council said. A third sign, 11 feet tall, must be taken down by December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1991 | LEN HALL
After 23 months, there is still no winner in the city's battle of "Porcupine Hill." Instead, the costly legal fight has spawned a third lawsuit. Since 1989, Robert Maurer has been trying build a 100,000-square-foot house on a 42-acre hilltop parcel distinguishable by 87 spindly date palms, for which the hill is nicknamed. The city opposes the project. That fight has evolved into three lawsuits between Maurer's development company, Coral Properties, and the city.
MAGAZINE
September 29, 1991 | R. Daniel Foster, EDITED BY MARY McNAMARA
Next time someone wails, "Is there a doctor in the house?" don't be surprised if Dr. Robert Maurer steps out of the wings. But forget the woman giving birth in the audience--Maurer is more likely to leap on stage to figure out why Willy Loman refuses to die. Brooklyn-born Maurer, 44, is director of behavioral sciences for the Family Practice Residency program at Santa Monica Hospital--a front job for his true passion: counseling testy troupers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1991 | WENDY PAULSON
Overriding the city planning director, the City Council this week voted to allow a landowner to proceed with plans to build a 15,000-square-foot structure on a hilltop. The unanimous vote upheld an appeal by landowner and developer Robert Maurer, who owns the highly visible 42 acres, which are subject to an ordinance prohibiting ridgeline development.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Deborah Stack was caught in the middle of a real emotional storm. Actors in the long-running hit show "Tamara" wanted time off for TV and film jobs, but general manager Stack usually had to play the heavy and tell them "no"--the show had to go on. As might be expected, that made some people in the "Tamara" family pretty unhappy. It was clearly another case for the theater shrink.
TRAVEL
August 28, 2005 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
THE flight from LAX to Denver was minutes from takeoff when a blast of noise erupted across the aisle from me. A girl, about 5 years old, was watching a raucous cartoon on a cranked-up DVD player, without headphones. Swiftly, a flight attendant approached her mother. "Ma'am, you'll have to ask your daughter to use the headphones," she said. The mom looked frazzled and said, "I did, and she said, 'No.'
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