Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Maxwell
IN THE NEWS

Robert Maxwell

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
December 13, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA and RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Manhattan district attorney's office said Thursday that it has launched an investigation to determine whether New York Daily News pension or employee savings plan assets were misappropriated under the paper's late publisher, Robert Maxwell. The "active, ongoing investigation" by the Rackets Bureau began Monday, spokesman Gerald McKelvey said, and was apparently triggered by a complaint from a Daily News employee.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
May 22, 2008 | David A. Keeps
In the mid-1960s, Robert Maxwell produced wheel-thrown and hand-sculpted stoneware vessels and animal-shaped "critters" that have become classics of California crafts. Though these hippie-era pieces remain highly collectible, Los Angeles-born Maxwell, 76, has created new planters with an undulating incised pattern for outdoor design expert Andy Hackman of California Living.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 5, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The New York Daily News will shut down March 15 unless a "binding agreement" is reached to sell the financially troubled, strike-crippled tabloid by that date, Publisher James Hoge said Monday. Sources at the Daily News said the paper was close to reaching an agreement in principle with British publishing magnate Robert Maxwell. But Maxwell would still have to win concessions from the paper's nine striking unions in the next 10 days to save it.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1999 | Associated Press
Coopers & Lybrand agreed to pay more than $108 million for its role in the affairs of the late media baron Robert Maxwell. Coopers & Lybrand, which merged with Price Waterhouse in 1998 to form PricewaterhouseCoopers, was the auditor for Maxwell Communication Corp. Maxwell disappeared from his yacht in 1991 under mysterious circumstances. Earlier that year, his empire collapsed.
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Maxwell, the Czechoslovak war orphan who became a billionaire British gentleman and grandiose global media baron, was found dead Tuesday in waters off Spain's Canary Islands, where he had been vacationing on his yacht. Authorities said Maxwell, 68, who earlier this year had bought the New York Daily News, vanished overnight from the 180-foot Lady Ghislaine. His unclothed body was found several hours later.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
McGraw-Hill Inc. said it signed a letter of intent to buy with $337.5 million in cash the 50% interest the late Robert Maxwell once controlled in their educational publishing joint venture.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kevin Maxwell Accused of Lying to Banks: British prosecutor Alan Suckling said the youngest son of Robert Maxwell repeatedly lied to creditors in 1991 in a desperate attempt to prevent the collapse of his father's corporate empire.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Kevin and Ian Maxwell were acquitted of misusing $35 million in pension funds to prop up the crumbling financial empire of their late father, publishing tycoon Robert Maxwell. Larry Trachtenberg, an American financial advisor, was also acquitted by the jury after eight days of deliberations. The three were accused of cheating retirees of Maxwell companies by misusing stock from their pension plans.
NEWS
March 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British publishing tycoon Robert Maxwell launched an Israeli Russian-language weekly newspaper, Vremya, produced by Soviet Jewish emigres. Maxwell said he hopes eventually to circulate the newspaper in Moscow. The Vremya staff, which has been publishing a daily Russian-language page in the Hebrew newspaper Maariv, is made up of Russian Jews who emigrated to Israel. Natan Sharansky, the celebrated former dissident, is chairman of the editorial board.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Kevin and Ian Maxwell were acquitted of misusing $35 million in pension funds to prop up the crumbling financial empire of their late father, publishing tycoon Robert Maxwell. Larry Trachtenberg, an American financial advisor, was also acquitted by the jury after eight days of deliberations. The three were accused of cheating retirees of Maxwell companies by misusing stock from their pension plans.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Morgan Stanley Unit Sued in Maxwell Case: London-based Mirror Group Newspapers Pension Trustees seeks $100 million it said was plundered by media tycoon Robert Maxwell before his death. "This claim is without foundation, and we will seek to ensure that it will be seen as such if it comes before the courts," a Morgan Stanley spokeswoman said. The suit was filed Friday in New York against Morgan Stanley Trust Co., a unit of Morgan Stanley Group Inc.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kevin Maxwell Accused of Lying to Banks: British prosecutor Alan Suckling said the youngest son of Robert Maxwell repeatedly lied to creditors in 1991 in a desperate attempt to prevent the collapse of his father's corporate empire.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1994 | Associated Press
As British prosecutors are preparing their case against two sons of the late Robert Maxwell, a West End show called "Maxwell: The Musical" is about to open. The Office of Serious Fraud is not entertained. Britain's attorney general wants to block the opening of the show, which is based on the life of the flamboyant publisher who died at sea in November, 1991. The show puts new lyrics to 14 Gilbert and Sullivan tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1994 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The attorney general of England will apply for an injunction Monday to stop the opening of a stage musical in London's West End theater district about the late press baron Robert Maxwell because of fears that the show will prejudice the forthcoming criminal trial of Maxwell's sons, Kevin and Ian.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
BofA to Pay $37 Million in Maxwell Case: The San Francisco-based bank agreed to settle claims from a pension plan looted by the late publisher Robert Maxwell. Trustees for the pension plan of the Mirror Group newspaper company, which Maxwell once controlled, had been seeking $56 million each from Bank of America and Zurich-based Credit Suisse.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
McGraw-Hill Inc. said it signed a letter of intent to buy with $337.5 million in cash the 50% interest the late Robert Maxwell once controlled in their educational publishing joint venture.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1993 | Associated Press
Robert Maxwell's life and mysterious death exceed anyone's definition of high drama, but a former associate nonetheless hopes to stage "Maxwell, the Musical," an updated operetta in the style of Gilbert and Sullivan. "You can't love a crook, but you can be fascinated by a crook," said Evan Steadman, producer of the planned $1.66-million musical, which he hopes to open in February. "If you knew Judas Iscariot, you might very well be tempted to put on a musical," said Steadman, 54.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|