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BUSINESS
April 24, 2001 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Betting on an old-line city in a slowing economy, the owner of the Waterfront Hilton Beach Resort in Huntington Beach said Monday that it has started construction next door on a 519-room resort that would be one of Orange County's 10 largest hotels. The Robert Mayer Corp., in conjunction with Hyatt Corp., also said it landed permanent financing for what will be called the Hyatt Regency Grand Coast Resort, which would dwarf the 290-room Hilton. Stephen K.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Wrecking crews and city officials took the first swings of the sledgehammer to the vacant Huntington Beach Inn on Friday, clearing the way for a mammoth resort complex. The 35-year-old inn has been abandoned since 1990 when the partnership that owned it went bankrupt. The Robert Mayer Corp. will begin construction on a resort that was also in limbo during the economic downturn of the early 1990s.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2001 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Betting on an old-line city in a slowing economy, the owner of the Waterfront Hilton in Huntington Beach said Monday it has started construction next door of a 519-room resort that will be one of Orange County's 10 largest hotels. Robert Mayer Corp., in conjunction with Hyatt Corp., also said it landed permanent financing for what will be called the Hyatt Regency Grand Coast Resort, which will dwarf the 290-room Hilton. Stephen K.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1997 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developers of Surf City's long-delayed oceanfront resort project Monday unveiled plans for a new $100-million hotel, conference and retail center--the latest reincarnation of a development that has been stalled since the late 1980s. The plans put forth by the Robert Mayer Corp., owner of the Waterfront Hilton which sits on 3.5 acres of the 50-acre site, supersede a time-share project announced by the company just last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What appears to be a bureaucratic rhubarb between Huntington Beach and the California Coastal Commission could have a surprising result: conservation of a threatened wetland area known by activists as "Little Shell" that is set to be bulldozed for housing. That site, on which developer Robert Mayer Corp.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2001 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Betting on an old-line city in a slowing economy, the owner of the Waterfront Hilton in Huntington Beach said Monday it has started construction next door of a 519-room resort that will be one of Orange County's 10 largest hotels. Robert Mayer Corp., in conjunction with Hyatt Corp., also said it landed permanent financing for what will be called the Hyatt Regency Grand Coast Resort, which will dwarf the 290-room Hilton. Stephen K.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2001 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Betting on an old-line city in a slowing economy, the owner of the Waterfront Hilton Beach Resort in Huntington Beach said Monday that it has started construction next door on a 519-room resort that would be one of Orange County's 10 largest hotels. The Robert Mayer Corp., in conjunction with Hyatt Corp., also said it landed permanent financing for what will be called the Hyatt Regency Grand Coast Resort, which would dwarf the 290-room Hilton. Stephen K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1999 | Kathleen Haney, (714) 965-7172
Driftwood Mobile Home Park is set to close by Feb. 16 to make way for the Waterfront Ocean Grant Resort and Conference Center project. Robert Mayer Corp., developer of the new resort, has committed $9.3 million to clearing out the mobile home park. To date, the developer has bought 40 mobile homes within Driftwood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1988
The Robert Mayer Corp., developer of the Waterfront project proposed for the downtown area, will describe the plan to the Rotary Club on Friday. The noon presentation at Francois' restaurant will include slides, renderings and a three-dimensional model of the development. The $345-million project, which has been submitted to city officials for approval, is planned for 50 acres on Pacific Coast Highway between Beach Boulevard and Huntington Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What appears to be a bureaucratic rhubarb between Huntington Beach and the California Coastal Commission could have a surprising result: conservation of a threatened wetland area known by activists as "Little Shell" that is set to be bulldozed for housing. That site, on which developer Robert Mayer Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Wrecking crews and city officials took the first swings of the sledgehammer to the vacant Huntington Beach Inn on Friday, clearing the way for a mammoth resort complex. The 35-year-old inn has been abandoned since 1990 when the partnership that owned it went bankrupt. The Robert Mayer Corp. will begin construction on a resort that was also in limbo during the economic downturn of the early 1990s.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1997 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developers of Surf City's long-delayed oceanfront resort project Monday unveiled plans for a new $100-million hotel, conference and retail center--the latest reincarnation of a development that has been stalled since the late 1980s. The plans put forth by the Robert Mayer Corp., owner of the Waterfront Hilton which sits on 3.5 acres of the 50-acre site, supersede a time-share project announced by the company just last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1989
Volunteer "sitters" are being sought by the Huntington Beach International Surf Museum, a budding shrine to the sport in downtown. Museum chairwoman Natalie Kotsch said volunteers are needed to watch the museum during business hours. A knowledge of surfing is not necessary, she said. Donations of surfing artifacts also are welcome, Kotsch said, adding that community support and funding continues to pour in.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2000
In a case closely watched by environmentalists and builders, a divided California Coastal Commission agreed Tuesday to let a developer pave a small, debris-filled wetland to build townhomes and duplexes in Huntington Beach. Commissioners, voting 7 to 5 after a contentious four-hour public hearing, rejected staff recommendations to preserve the 0.7-acre patch of brackish freshwater wetland near Pacific Coast Highway and Beach Boulevard.
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