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Robert Mckee

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1989 | MARTIN ZIMMERMAN
"On the first day of class, they look like stunned mullets. I mean, they don't know what hit them. "On the second day, depression sets in--when they realize how hard it is. And then on the third day, I give 'em a shot in the arm, inspire them, because screenwriting is the most difficult writing form of all--because there is no place to hide."
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BUSINESS
April 11, 2007 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
In the film "Adaptation," a screenwriting instructor named Robert McKee humiliates a struggling scribe played by actor Nicolas Cage. Launching into an obscenity-laced tirade, the McKee character screams, "You, my friend, don't know crap about life! And why are you wasting my two precious hours with your movie? I don't have any bloody use for it!" The real-life McKee turned in an equally dramatic performance last week in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
In "Adaptation," the hall of mirrors movie that plays with the angst of its screenwriter, Charlie Kaufman, screenwriting guru Robert McKee appears as a pivotal character. Brash and bushy-browed, McKee (played by Brian Cox) embodies Hollywood's crass commercialism, stomping on creative efforts in favor of tried-and-true paths to commercial success.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
In "Adaptation," the hall of mirrors movie that plays with the angst of its screenwriter, Charlie Kaufman, screenwriting guru Robert McKee appears as a pivotal character. Brash and bushy-browed, McKee (played by Brian Cox) embodies Hollywood's crass commercialism, stomping on creative efforts in favor of tried-and-true paths to commercial success.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2007 | Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writer
In the film "Adaptation," a screenwriting instructor named Robert McKee humiliates a struggling scribe played by actor Nicolas Cage. Launching into an obscenity-laced tirade, the McKee character screams, "You, my friend, don't know crap about life! And why are you wasting my two precious hours with your movie? I don't have any bloody use for it!" The real-life McKee turned in an equally dramatic performance last week in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Zachary Pincus-Roth
Some people take care of orchids. Others take care of guinea pigs. Barbara takes care of tropes. Most of the day she's a 51-year-old seamstress in Illinois and a caregiver for her husband. But in her spare time, Barbara tends to four tropes: "Cool Bike," "Badass Longcoat," "You Fail Logic Forever" and "Silly Reason for War." "They were a mess, they needed to be cleaned up, and nobody else was doing it, so I adopted them," she says. "It's equivalent of wiping down the sink every morning after I brush my teeth."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1998
The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books will offer such diverse attractions as Charlton Heston reading Hemingway and children's entertainers Kino and Lucy doing bits from their "Storytime" TV show, along with book signings and, perhaps the most anticipated part of the festival, about 70 author panels. The event will draw people from San Diego to Santa Barbara and from East L.A. to the Westside.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Chris Barton
For the first time in its run, the chips look stacked against "The Lego Movie. " Liam Neeson's latest action film, "Non-Stop," surged to the top of the box office on its opening night Friday with $10 million in ticket sales, according to estimates. Just behind with an estimated $9.4 million was "Son of God," the biblical epic culled from the History Channel's hit 10-hour miniseries "The Bible. " With Neeson starring as a federal air marshal in a race against time to save an airliner, "Non-Stop" builds on the success the actor has had with thrillers "Taken" and "Taken 2. " Also starring Julianne Moore and the Oscar-nominated Lupita Nyong'o of "12 Years a Slave," the film was expected to earn $20 million this weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
Thousand Oaks needs to do something to prevent oversized vehicles from parking on city streets, but a proposed ordinance modeled after a law in Agoura Hills is not the answer, the City Council has decided. Following complaints from about 20 residents and advocates for recreational vehicle owners, the council voted 4 to 0 to reject the ordinance and come up with a different plan to prevent the vehicles from parking on city streets for more than 72 hours at a time.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | From Associated Press
A sudden, sharp swell rocked a whale-watching boat as it headed out to sea, tossing four passengers overboard and injuring at least nine people. Those pitched overboard were rescued, including a 3-year-old boy who was saved by a deckhand after the swell lifted the 55-foot Big Mama 1 and dropped it hard. "An exact feeling would be (like) an elevator dropping, but more so," said Harbor Patrol Officer Tom Kellerman, who helped pluck passengers from the water.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1989 | MARTIN ZIMMERMAN
"On the first day of class, they look like stunned mullets. I mean, they don't know what hit them. "On the second day, depression sets in--when they realize how hard it is. And then on the third day, I give 'em a shot in the arm, inspire them, because screenwriting is the most difficult writing form of all--because there is no place to hide."
NATIONAL
December 17, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Monday threw out a University of South Florida lawsuit that sought court approval for a plan to fire a tenured Palestinian professor accused of having terrorist ties. The university had wanted U.S. District Judge Susan Bucklew to rule that its plan to fire the computer science professor, Sami Al-Arian, would not violate his constitutional rights to free speech.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By David Kipen
"Hushpuppy grabs a baby chick and puts it to her ear. A TINY HEARTBEAT. She listens with focused wonder and intensity. " - from the "Beasts of the Southern Wild" screenplay Can we please drive a stake through the heart of the Screenwriting 101 commandment that using a voice-over is somehow cheating? Lucy Alibar, for one, would really appreciate it if all the script gurus would just pipe down. She's the co-screenwriter and, really, co-creator of "Beasts of the Southern Wild," which she and her friend since they were teens, director Benh Zeitlin, adapted from her play "Juicy and Delicious.
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