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Robert Mcnamara

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NEWS
May 16, 1995 | ROBERT SCHEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Back at his retreat on Martha's Vineyard, where he headed directly after San Diego, the last stop on his national book tour, Robert Strange McNamara must be satisfied. After a month of talks shows, speeches and interviews, his book was solidly at the top of the bestseller list, and none of his critics had landed a glove.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By John Horn
TELLURIDE, Colo. - Donald Rumsfeld is no Robert McNamara. Just ask filmmaker Errol Morris, who has taken on both controversial former Defense secretaries as documentary subjects in their twilight years: McNamara in 2003's "The Fog of War," and now Rumsfeld in "The Unknown Known," which had its world premiere at the Telluride Film Festival over Labor Day weekend. "The Fog of War," which won a documentary Oscar, revealed McNamara, a chief architect of the Vietnam War, as a reflective man in his late 80s willing to acknowledge errors of judgment.
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BOOKS
April 16, 1995 | David Halberstam, David Halberstam won the Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the Vietnam War for the New York Times. He is now at work on his 15th book, about what became of the young people he covered during the Civil Rights sit-ins in Nashville in 1960
About 25 years ago, when I was working on the book that became "The Best and the Brightest," I spent part of a surreal afternoon with Robert McNamara, then head of the World Bank.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Craig McNamara is a sustainable farming expert, organic walnut farmer in the Sacramento Valley town of Winters, founder of the nonprofit Center for Land-Based Learning and the California Farm Academy, and president of the state Board of Food and Agriculture, which advises state officials on farming policies. Organic food basket: At his Sierra Orchards, Craig McNamara makes extensive use of pro-environment and conservation techniques as he grows 450 acres of organic walnuts, presses organic olive oil from 150 trees that are more than a century old and helps his son raise hops for a local craft beer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By John Horn
TELLURIDE, Colo. - Donald Rumsfeld is no Robert McNamara. Just ask filmmaker Errol Morris, who has taken on both controversial former Defense secretaries as documentary subjects in their twilight years: McNamara in 2003's "The Fog of War," and now Rumsfeld in "The Unknown Known," which had its world premiere at the Telluride Film Festival over Labor Day weekend. "The Fog of War," which won a documentary Oscar, revealed McNamara, a chief architect of the Vietnam War, as a reflective man in his late 80s willing to acknowledge errors of judgment.
BOOKS
September 8, 1996 | Barry Bearak, Barry Bearak is a Times' staff writer based in New York
These two books about the war in Vietnam could hardly be less alike and yet they steer us toward the same awful conclusion: Character is destiny, and grave flaws in character--not merely chance political missteps--doomed America to its misdoings in Southeast Asia. It was hubris that flung open the national trapdoor and lies and brutality that came careening out of the cellar. "The Living and the Dead: Robert McNamara and Five Lives of a Lost War," by journalist Paul Hendrickson, is a masterfully written, epic character study of Robert S. McNamara, the war's brainy architect.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | Associated Press
Robert McNamara returned to Vietnam on Tuesday for the first time since the end of the war he helped escalate in the 1960s, and he said he hopes to persuade the country to open its archives on the conflict. The former U.S. defense secretary has admitted in memoirs that U.S. participation in the Vietnam War was "terribly wrong." His current trip is to propose a conference of war-era decision-makers from both countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"We like to think of the world in terms of good and evil, it makes it more tractable," Errol Morris said when his remarkable new documentary, "The Fog of War," debuted at Cannes in May. "Otherwise it's far more difficult to deal with -- and it's problematic as it is." Never one to shy away from challenges, Morris has come up with one of the best documentaries of this or any year. Part filmed biography of the eternally controversial Vietnam-era Secretary of Defense Robert S.
OPINION
March 18, 2002
As a Vietnam combat veteran I'm disgusted that you gave one inch of space to the immoral, lying architect of Lyndon Johnson's war effort ("A Pretty Poor Posture for a Superpower," Commentary, March 13). While I was there (1966) we fought with both hands tied behind our backs. We entered North Vietnamese airspace at the same time every day, presumably to be sure they were ready for us. Robert McNamara kept us from destroying key targets--which helped to prolong the war and ensure more needless American and South Vietnamese deaths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1995
Henry Kissinger's description of the Vietnam War as "the result of the pursuit of a noble cause, the consequences of which were incorrectly assessed" (Opinion, Dec. 10) is a preposterous and cynical attempt to distort the truth of his own involvement in the war for three years, marked by his failure to assess the bombing of Cambodia and later incursion of allied ground troops into that country. As President Nixon's national security advisor, Kissinger masterminded the illegal, bloody Cambodia adventure--a colossal and costly failure to assess the consequences of such a foolhardy move that did not go unnoticed by four of his top-ranking aides who resigned in protest.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Believing Is Seeing (Observations on the Mysteries of Photography) Errol Morris Penguin Press: 310 pp., $40 In the brutally hot summer of 1936, Arthur Rothstein, a young photographer working for a branch of the Farm Security Administration, made a series of images that soon took on a bizarre life of their own. They were photos of a sun-bleached cow skull resting in a bone-dry corner of South Dakota, one of several drought-decimated states...
NATIONAL
June 18, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
When Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates leaves the Pentagon every evening, he carries home a sheaf of documents about the latest American soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq. After dinner, usually alone, he takes out a pen and writes notes to the families of the fallen. And most nights, he weeps. He has signed about 3,400 condolence letters since taking over the Pentagon in late 2006, aides say. "There's probably not a day in the last four years that I haven't wept, and it's mostly when I'm doing those letters," Gates said in an interview.
OPINION
July 8, 2009
Re "Robert S. McNamara, 1916 - 2009: Architect of Vietnam War later revealed his regrets," Obituary, July 7 I do not dispute the intellectual prowess of Robert McNamara, even going back to the time he was considered the young genius of Ford Motor Co. What Americans should remember is the hubris he displayed during the Vietnam War as secretary of Defense through his total endorsement of the domino theory, not challenging the faulty and inferior advice...
OPINION
February 17, 2006
Watching Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice asking for $85 million to support the opposition in Iran (Feb. 16) reminded me of previous administrations' requests for money to support and prop up governments in Southeast Asia. Before, we were told we were fighting the communists; now we are told we are fighting Muslim extremists. We supported Ahmad Chalabi in Iraq the same as we supported others in Southeast Asia, and all we have gotten is corruption and hatred of the U.S. Will we also see a mea culpa years from now from Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld like we have seen from Robert McNamara?
OPINION
January 8, 2006
Re "A Not-Always-Diplomatic Gathering," Jan. 6 If the Bush administration had been less high on the smell of oil profits and less arrogant about the superiority of American values, meetings with former secretaries of State and Defense -- before launching an invasion of Iraq -- might have been constructive. Now they offer little more than a wider forum for commiseration. Chagrined officials must show us that assignment of responsibility and corrective action within our democracy are still possible, even after voters failed to do so in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"We like to think of the world in terms of good and evil, it makes it more tractable," Errol Morris said when his remarkable new documentary, "The Fog of War," debuted at Cannes in May. "Otherwise it's far more difficult to deal with -- and it's problematic as it is." Never one to shy away from challenges, Morris has come up with one of the best documentaries of this or any year. Part filmed biography of the eternally controversial Vietnam-era Secretary of Defense Robert S.
OPINION
June 27, 2003
Re "The Erosion of Civilization" (Opinion, June 15) and "A Plan to Ban Nukes" (Commentary, June 22): We are a nation of robbers. Our defiance of the nuclear nonproliferation treaty denies our children a future of peace. We steal from our children to accommodate our lavish lifestyles, denying them the resources they will need for their own families. We worship gilded things in place of nature, leaving a soiled, polluted planet. And we rob other countries of their resources and their labor so that we might have more than any other nation in the world.
BOOKS
June 1, 1997
George C. Herring's review (Book Review, May 11) applauds Robert Schulzinger's attack on my film "JFK" as "grotesquely fictionalized" and asserts "There is not one shred of evidence that JFK planned to extricate the United States [from Vietnam]." Not true. Whether it is the stark difference between John F. Kennedy's National Security Action Memorandum 263, ordering the first withdrawal of 1,000 American advisors and Lyndon Johnson's reversal of that order in NSAM 273; or career military historian John Newman's well-researched book, "JFK and Vietnam"; or Robert McNamara's recent apologia, there is ample evidence that Kennedy was prepared to reverse course and extricate the United States from Vietnam.
OPINION
June 27, 2003
Re "The Erosion of Civilization" (Opinion, June 15) and "A Plan to Ban Nukes" (Commentary, June 22): We are a nation of robbers. Our defiance of the nuclear nonproliferation treaty denies our children a future of peace. We steal from our children to accommodate our lavish lifestyles, denying them the resources they will need for their own families. We worship gilded things in place of nature, leaving a soiled, polluted planet. And we rob other countries of their resources and their labor so that we might have more than any other nation in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Errol Morris knows reality. Making singular documentaries such as "A Thin Blue Line" and "Fast, Cheap & Out of Control" for 25 years does that for you. And what he knows is that reality is a lot more nuanced and complicated, a lot more troubling, than we are ready to accept. "We like to think of the world in terms of good and evil, it makes it more tractable," the filmmaker says in his quietly confident way. "Otherwise it's far more difficult to deal with -- and it's problematic as it is."
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