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Robert Morganthau

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BUSINESS
August 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clifford Attorney Decries Freeze on Client's Assets: An attorney for Clark Clifford says Clifford and his law partner cannot pay routine expenses, doctors' bills and legal fees because prosecutors froze their assets after indicting them in the BCCI banking scandal. Robert S. Bennett accused Manhattan Dist. Atty. Robert Morgenthau of seeking to destroy Clifford and Robert Altman.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clifford Attorney Decries Freeze on Client's Assets: An attorney for Clark Clifford says Clifford and his law partner cannot pay routine expenses, doctors' bills and legal fees because prosecutors froze their assets after indicting them in the BCCI banking scandal. Robert S. Bennett accused Manhattan Dist. Atty. Robert Morgenthau of seeking to destroy Clifford and Robert Altman.
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NEWS
March 20, 1985
An Acting New York State Supreme Court justice ruled that a second grand jury called to investigate so-called subway vigilante Bernard Goetz, who shot four youths last Decenber, could continue its deliberations. In a court hearing, Goetz's lawyers sought to have the grand jury dismissed. Justice Stephen G. Crane did not require Dist. Atty. Robert M. Morganthau to produce new evidence in open court, ruling that "the defense's claim lacks merit."
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | From Reuters
Gov. George Pataki on Thursday signed into law a bill that makes money laundering--a big concern because New York City is the world's financial capital--a new state crime punishable by up to 25 years in prison. Pataki, at a news conference, said the state handles about $2.7 billion in money transfers a day. New York needed its own law because until now local prosecutors have been handicapped.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ronald Reagan Administration, under heavy pressure from high-powered Washington lobbyists hired by the Bank of Credit & Commerce International, repeatedly ignored evidence that the Abu Dhabi-owned bank was operating illegally in the United States, a congressional committee was told Thursday. Former U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1998 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In all his days nailing spies and other crooks as a federal prosecutor, state Sen. Adam Schiff never once sniffed, "Take a plea." He never groused in a gravelly voice that a wily legal foe was "going to walk into that courtroom with a suitcase full of respect," or that "he looks like Clarence Darrow; we look like the Spanish Inquisition." But to some of his constituents, Adam Schiff, Burbank politician, might as well be Adam Schiff, hard-boiled Hollywood prosecutor.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The BCCI scandal has blown up a roaring political storm in Peru, where opponents of former President Alan Garcia are attempting to link him to bribes allegedly paid in exchange for official Peruvian deposits of $270 million in the bank. At a news conference Wednesday, Garcia called a congressional committee's investigation of his finances "a scandalous witch hunt," and he denied that he had anything to do with the Bank of Credit & Commerce International or any bribes.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA and RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Manhattan district attorney's office said Thursday that it has launched an investigation to determine whether New York Daily News pension or employee savings plan assets were misappropriated under the paper's late publisher, Robert Maxwell. The "active, ongoing investigation" by the Rackets Bureau began Monday, spokesman Gerald McKelvey said, and was apparently triggered by a complaint from a Daily News employee.
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
Outrage was the reaction on Wall Street last month when three top financial executives were handcuffed and led away--like hapless bank tellers in a garden-variety embezzlement--to be booked on insider-trading charges. It seemed an unnecessary humiliation for executives of Goldman, Sachs & Co. and Kidder, Peabody & Co.--an affront, even, to the dignity of Wall Street. Many were quick to lay the blame on Rudolph W.
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