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Robert Morse

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1991 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for Calendar
When the news first filtered back from Boston last year that Robert Morse was doing a one-man show on Truman Capote--and really looking like his subject--a lot of people were skeptical. Now, with the Tony Award-winning "Tru" at the Henry Fonda Theatre in Hollywood, local audiences are getting a chance to see the results of Kevin Haney's makeup magic. "It started about two years ago when I got a call from the writer-director, Jay Presson Allen," Haney, 35, said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011
Carol Channing, Robert Morse, Rita Moreno and Tyne Daly are among the Broadway veterans who'll be belting out show tunes in "Original Cast 2," a benefit on April 2 to raise money for AIDS Project Los Angeles. Others who'll be reprising numbers from such productions as "Company," "Hello Dolly," "Showboat," "Three Penny Opera" and "Miss Saigon" include Philip Casnoff, Constance Towers, Patrick Cassidy, Jonelle Allen, Carole Cook, Charlotte Rae, Vicki Lewis and Bill Hutton. The 27th annual Southland Theatre Artists Goodwill Event will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex at Cal State Los Angeles.
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NEWS
November 22, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Morse received a veritable trunkload of praise from the critics and numerous awards--including the prestigious Tony. Yet the actor still can't explain his performance as the late author Truman Capote in Jay Presson Allen's one-man play, "Tru." PBS' "American Playhouse" series brings "Tru" to the small screen Monday in a performance taped last year at Chicago's Shubert Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Rarely does one describe a 79-year-old man as "boyish" (and actually mean it), but the phrase fits Robert Morse like a comfortable pair of shoes. His hair may be gray, but the impish personality, young countenance and modified Beatles haircut still remain from when he catapulted to Broadway stardom and his first Tony Award nearly 50 years ago in the Frank Loesser-Abe Burrows musical "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying." Morse went on to star in such films as "The Loved One" (1965)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Robert Morse, who became a Broadway star in "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" (for which he won a Tony in 1962, later starring in the movie), is well-acquainted with the highs and lows, hits and misses of an actor's life. But he keeps smiling. "I've also been on the other side," said Morse, who opens today at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa in the California Music Theatre's revival of Victor Herbert's 1903 "Babes in Toyland." "I've done dinner theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Truman Capote was not everybody's idea of heaven, least of all his own. The late author of such best sellers as "In Cold Blood" and "Breakfast at Tiffany's" was a funny-looking, physically stunted man, yanked up by the bootstraps of his talent and a shrill determination to be eccentric and defiant. It is this Tru we discover in "Tru," the one-man play about Capote that opened Friday at the Henry Fonda Theatre in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
N ot even Broadway could have invented the kind of comeback actor Robert Morse experienced last year. Floundering in dinner theater and little-seen musical revivals for over a decade, he found himself picked in mid-1989 by writer-director Jay Presson Allen for a daunting assignment: Morse, the perennially youthful musical comedy star, would do a one-character drama about two days in the life of the late author Truman Capote.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1993 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a wrap for TV movies/'92. In a tradition begun last year, we focus a kaleidoscopic eye on the diversity, patterns, quirks, highs and a few of the more wrenching lows of the year. For all those artists and movies we missed--or didn't love or hate enough to mention--there's always, of course, next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
True Stories: It is not a lie: The play "Tru" will return to Los Angeles a month after it leaves. Robert Morse will repeat his Tony Award-winning role of Truman Capote at the Henry Fonda Theatre beginning April 9. The Jay Presson Allen show closes its current run at the theater on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1998
Tony and Emmy winner Robert Morse ("Tru," "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying") is slated to head the cast in a concert reading of Mary Chase's classic, Pulitzer Prize-winning fantasy-comedy "Harvey," as a fund-raiser for Theatre 40 on Dec. 6 at 7 p.m. Morse will play the eccentric Elwood P. Dowd, whose family tries to commit him to a sanitarium because he claims that his best friend is an invisible, 6-foot-plus-tall white rabbit. Theatre 40 members will complete the cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1998
Tony and Emmy winner Robert Morse ("Tru," "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying") is slated to head the cast in a concert reading of Mary Chase's classic, Pulitzer Prize-winning fantasy-comedy "Harvey," as a fund-raiser for Theatre 40 on Dec. 6 at 7 p.m. Morse will play the eccentric Elwood P. Dowd, whose family tries to commit him to a sanitarium because he claims that his best friend is an invisible, 6-foot-plus-tall white rabbit. Theatre 40 members will complete the cast.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH
(NR) This hilarious adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's hilarious novel loosely centers on the goings-on at a California mortuary. The 1965 comedy, directed by Tony Richardson, is anchored by a terrific cast including Robert Morse, Jonathan Winters, John Gielgud, Rod Steiger and Liberace (yes, Liberace). Screens Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Huntington Beach Art Center, 538 Main St., Huntington Beach. $4 general admission, $2 for museum members. (714) 374-1650.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1993 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a wrap for TV movies/'92. In a tradition begun last year, we focus a kaleidoscopic eye on the diversity, patterns, quirks, highs and a few of the more wrenching lows of the year. For all those artists and movies we missed--or didn't love or hate enough to mention--there's always, of course, next year.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Morse received a veritable trunkload of praise from the critics and numerous awards--including the prestigious Tony. Yet the actor still can't explain his performance as the late author Truman Capote in Jay Presson Allen's one-man play, "Tru." PBS' "American Playhouse" series brings "Tru" to the small screen Monday in a performance taped last year at Chicago's Shubert Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
True Stories: It is not a lie: The play "Tru" will return to Los Angeles a month after it leaves. Robert Morse will repeat his Tony Award-winning role of Truman Capote at the Henry Fonda Theatre beginning April 9. The Jay Presson Allen show closes its current run at the theater on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1991 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for Calendar
When the news first filtered back from Boston last year that Robert Morse was doing a one-man show on Truman Capote--and really looking like his subject--a lot of people were skeptical. Now, with the Tony Award-winning "Tru" at the Henry Fonda Theatre in Hollywood, local audiences are getting a chance to see the results of Kevin Haney's makeup magic. "It started about two years ago when I got a call from the writer-director, Jay Presson Allen," Haney, 35, said.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH
(NR) This hilarious adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's hilarious novel loosely centers on the goings-on at a California mortuary. The 1965 comedy, directed by Tony Richardson, is anchored by a terrific cast including Robert Morse, Jonathan Winters, John Gielgud, Rod Steiger and Liberace (yes, Liberace). Screens Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Huntington Beach Art Center, 538 Main St., Huntington Beach. $4 general admission, $2 for museum members. (714) 374-1650.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Within each of us there dwells a child, a child who knows when it is being conned rather than being told a proper bedtime story.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Truman Capote was not everybody's idea of heaven, least of all his own. The late author of such best sellers as "In Cold Blood" and "Breakfast at Tiffany's" was a funny-looking, physically stunted man, yanked up by the bootstraps of his talent and a shrill determination to be eccentric and defiant. It is this Tru we discover in "Tru," the one-man play about Capote that opened Friday at the Henry Fonda Theatre in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
N ot even Broadway could have invented the kind of comeback actor Robert Morse experienced last year. Floundering in dinner theater and little-seen musical revivals for over a decade, he found himself picked in mid-1989 by writer-director Jay Presson Allen for a daunting assignment: Morse, the perennially youthful musical comedy star, would do a one-character drama about two days in the life of the late author Truman Capote.
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