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Robert Morton

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Morton, the executive producer of "The Late Show With David Letterman" and an associate of Letterman's since the premiere of the talk-show host's NBC program in 1982, is leaving "The Late Show," effectively immediately. Morton will take a newly created position with Worldwide Pants, Letterman's production company. Morton will be executive producer of "The High Life," a weekly comedy that World Wide Pants will begin filming this spring for HBO.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Morton, the executive producer of "The Late Show With David Letterman" and an associate of Letterman's since the premiere of the talk-show host's NBC program in 1982, is leaving "The Late Show," effectively immediately. Morton will take a newly created position with Worldwide Pants, Letterman's production company. Morton will be executive producer of "The High Life," a weekly comedy that World Wide Pants will begin filming this spring for HBO.
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NEWS
August 26, 1985
The New York City Tribune, founded by the Rev. Sun Myung Moon in 1983 as an alternative to the city's three major daily newspapers, announced it is suspending publication until 1986. Editor-in-Chief Robert Morton said today's edition would be the last of the year. He said the paper's owners, News World Communications Inc., plan to resume publication Jan. 1 at a new, modern plant. He attributed the shutdown to the paper's "ambitious reorganization."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Late Night With David Letterman" segment producer Robert Morton was named Tuesday to replace Barry Sand as the NBC show's producer, the network announced. Sand resigned last week to become producer of Fox Broadcasting's "Late Show." Morton, 34, has been with "Late Night" since Letterman began his late-night high jinks in 1982. He was previously creative director for MTV and an asssociate producer for ABC's "Good Morning America."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Gordon Kibbee, 89, a pipe organist who recorded for motion pictures, radio and television, died Wednesday of natural causes at his Encino home. Renowned among his peers, Kibbee was among the 31 people who gathered in Toluca Lake on Feb. 8, 1955, to found the American Assn. of Theatre Organ Enthusiasts. He remained active in the group, now known as the American Theatre Organ Society, and was a popular organist for meetings across the country.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2010 | By Joe Flint >>>
Want to buy a commercial to welcome Jay Leno back as host of NBC's "The Tonight Show"? It'll run you only about $35,000. If that sounds like a lot, a few years ago that ad time would have gone for $50,000. For all the hype about the futures of Leno and Conan O'Brien, the era when a comedian could be crowned the undisputed "king of late night" is, like the price of a 30-second spot in one of their shows, on the ebb -- and with it, the economics underpinning late-night TV. The world that O'Brien entered when he began his first late-night show 16 years ago is radically different from the one that will greet him when he returns to the air. Those changes are likely to shape everything from where O'Brien lands to how much he will be paid and the format of the show -- band or no band?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
Theater organist Dennis James is fond of quoting Mary Pickford's observation: "When sound came to silent films, it was a big step backwards." James is also quick to point out that the "silent" motion pictures from the first part of the 20th Century were anything but silent when shown in theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2002 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
If those mysterious TV king-makers ever tried to assemble the perfect talk-show host in their laboratory high in the Hollywood Hills, the resulting entity might come out looking an awful lot like Wayne Brady. At the tender age of 30, the Florida native is already a veteran of the stand-up comedy circuit, his improv skills have earned him a pair of Emmy nominations as a member of the "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" troupe, and he can sing better than 99% of the popified poseurs on today's Top 40 list.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1994 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of David Letterman's producers said Friday that the CBS late-night show might be willing to have Madonna return as a guest, but not for a repeat of Thursday's performance. The singer used four-letter words 13 times during the taping of "Late Show With David Letterman" Thursday evening. She also threw in a couple of other expressions the network considered inappropriate. CBS deleted the offending audio before the show was broadcast.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN
The quincentennial of the death of Johannes Ockeghem came and went two years ago with little local notice. But the anniversary was much marked by early music vocal groups, and ripples of their efforts have finally washed up here, thanks to UCLA's Center for the Performing Arts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
Newport Beach has agreed to a nearly $1-million settlement with three former officers who claim they were victims of a corrupt and retaliatory police department that passed them over for promotions by using tests designed to favor hand-picked candidates. Two of the ex-officers said a pair of past police chiefs and a former city administrator engaged in favoritism, and the third said he was demoted when he complained about the promotion practices. Former police lieutenants Craig Frizzell and Steve Shulman will each receive about $425,000 in the settlement.
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