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Robert Morton

NATIONAL
December 8, 2004 | Lynn Smith And Scott Collins, Times Staff Writers
and fresh voice -- in Glasgow, Scotland-born actor Craig Ferguson, named Tuesday to replace Craig Kilborn as host of "The Late Late Show." Ferguson, 42, a musician and screenwriter with a thick burr, won out over three finalists -- stand-up comic D.L. Hughley, MTV host Damien Fahey and VH1 regular Michael Ian Black. All four were among several candidates invited for on-air tryouts after Kilborn left the show in August.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
Newport Beach has agreed to a nearly $1-million settlement with three former officers who claim they were victims of a corrupt and retaliatory police department that passed them over for promotions by using tests designed to favor hand-picked candidates. Two of the ex-officers said a pair of past police chiefs and a former city administrator engaged in favoritism, and the third said he was demoted when he complained about the promotion practices. Former police lieutenants Craig Frizzell and Steve Shulman will each receive about $425,000 in the settlement.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
The moment Marshall Sylver takes off his pair of Ray-Bans, stare deeply into his eyes and relax. That's right--let your arms fall limply to your sides and your head drop slowly forward, almost to your chest. Now, sleep. And let Sylver, through the power of hypnotic suggestion, get you to do almost anything he tells you to do--from imitating Prince or Madonna on a nightclub stage, to kicking your lifelong smoking habit or overcoming your fear of heights.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1997 | PHIL ROSENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than two hours passed before the late John Belushi was mentioned even once. But his untamed, wild-eyed and thoroughly unapologetic presence could be felt throughout the American Film Institute's tribute to NBC's "Saturday Night Live" as part of the third annual U.S. Comedy Arts Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1988 | PAUL KRASSNER
Fox Broadcasting's late, not-necessarily-so-great "Wilton North Report" is the stuff of history. Yes, very brief history. It was scheduled to open Nov. 30--then was postponed to Dec. 11. It lasted until Jan. 5. One of its employees was the writer here, who is editor-publisher of the Realist and a stand-up satirist--and an occasional contributor to these pages. Calendar asked him for an insider's view on the show, its hopes, its fears, its ambitions--and its demise.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after CBS Entertainment President Jeff Sagansky all but guaranteed that his network has locked up David Letterman as a late-night host, his boss displayed a more cautious approach Tuesday. "I can't stand up here and say this decision has been made," CBS Broadcast Group President Howard Stringer told TV critics in Santa Monica during their annual winter gathering.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1994 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
CBS late-night host David Letterman says he is interested in Tom Snyder as a candidate for a nightly series to follow his own show but doesn't know whether the network would go for the idea. Snyder, 57, hosted a late-night NBC talk program, "Tomorrow," after Johnny Carson's "The Tonight Show" from 1973 to 1982. He has a contract to continue his 1-year-old CNBC cable talk show until January. Bob Costas recently turned down the post-Letterman series to remain with NBC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1992 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Television's late night institution, "The Tonight Show," entered a new era Monday when Jay Leno took over as host and immediately gave the 38-year-old series a major face lift. Leno, 42, only the fourth regular host in the show's history--following Steve Allen, Jack Paar and Carson--introduced a new set, a new musical theme and a smaller, eight-piece band led by jazz saxophonist Branford Marsalis, 31. Together they seemed to exemplify a younger look for the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So, just what happened to comedian Bill Hicks last Friday on CBS' "Late Show With David Letterman"? Hicks himself isn't sure, and the "Late Show" and CBS folks aren't saying much. All that's for certain: Hicks performed during the afternoon taping, but by the time the show aired, the segment (and all mention of Hicks) had been edited out and replaced with a canned segment by comic Bill Scheft.
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