Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Morton
IN THE NEWS

Robert Morton

NEWS
April 25, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Kent Smith, a debonair leading man whose finely etched features were seen in such diverse productions as "King Richard II" at New York's City Center, "The Fountainhead" on screen and "Peyton Place" on television, has died. Smith was 78 when he died Tuesday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills. He died of congestive heart failure, according to his wife, actress Edith Atwater, who said that he had been at the Motion Picture and Television Home for 2 1/2 years.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
The moment Marshall Sylver takes off his pair of Ray-Bans, stare deeply into his eyes and relax. That's right--let your arms fall limply to your sides and your head drop slowly forward, almost to your chest. Now, sleep. And let Sylver, through the power of hypnotic suggestion, get you to do almost anything he tells you to do--from imitating Prince or Madonna on a nightclub stage, to kicking your lifelong smoking habit or overcoming your fear of heights.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2010 | By Joe Flint >>>
Want to buy a commercial to welcome Jay Leno back as host of NBC's "The Tonight Show"? It'll run you only about $35,000. If that sounds like a lot, a few years ago that ad time would have gone for $50,000. For all the hype about the futures of Leno and Conan O'Brien, the era when a comedian could be crowned the undisputed "king of late night" is, like the price of a 30-second spot in one of their shows, on the ebb -- and with it, the economics underpinning late-night TV. The world that O'Brien entered when he began his first late-night show 16 years ago is radically different from the one that will greet him when he returns to the air. Those changes are likely to shape everything from where O'Brien lands to how much he will be paid and the format of the show -- band or no band?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after CBS Entertainment President Jeff Sagansky all but guaranteed that his network has locked up David Letterman as a late-night host, his boss displayed a more cautious approach Tuesday. "I can't stand up here and say this decision has been made," CBS Broadcast Group President Howard Stringer told TV critics in Santa Monica during their annual winter gathering.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1994 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
CBS late-night host David Letterman says he is interested in Tom Snyder as a candidate for a nightly series to follow his own show but doesn't know whether the network would go for the idea. Snyder, 57, hosted a late-night NBC talk program, "Tomorrow," after Johnny Carson's "The Tonight Show" from 1973 to 1982. He has a contract to continue his 1-year-old CNBC cable talk show until January. Bob Costas recently turned down the post-Letterman series to remain with NBC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1992 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Television's late night institution, "The Tonight Show," entered a new era Monday when Jay Leno took over as host and immediately gave the 38-year-old series a major face lift. Leno, 42, only the fourth regular host in the show's history--following Steve Allen, Jack Paar and Carson--introduced a new set, a new musical theme and a smaller, eight-piece band led by jazz saxophonist Branford Marsalis, 31. Together they seemed to exemplify a younger look for the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2005 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Jon Stewart, the most trusted fake in American news, may be taking his humor campaign to network television, beyond the confines of Comedy Central, the cable channel that airs "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart." Comedy Central has agreed to finance Stewart's Busboy Productions and its development of television projects, but part of the deal lets Stewart flirt with outsiders when looking for a home for those projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So, just what happened to comedian Bill Hicks last Friday on CBS' "Late Show With David Letterman"? Hicks himself isn't sure, and the "Late Show" and CBS folks aren't saying much. All that's for certain: Hicks performed during the afternoon taping, but by the time the show aired, the segment (and all mention of Hicks) had been edited out and replaced with a canned segment by comic Bill Scheft.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2004 | Lynn Smith And Scott Collins, Times Staff Writers
and fresh voice -- in Glasgow, Scotland-born actor Craig Ferguson, named Tuesday to replace Craig Kilborn as host of "The Late Late Show." Ferguson, 42, a musician and screenwriter with a thick burr, won out over three finalists -- stand-up comic D.L. Hughley, MTV host Damien Fahey and VH1 regular Michael Ian Black. All four were among several candidates invited for on-air tryouts after Kilborn left the show in August.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|