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Robert Mueller

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NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON -- Outgoing FBI director Robert Mueller began the job a week before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He prepares to step down from the position 12 years later in a world that has changed completely - and with it the agency, which Mueller is credited with guiding into the 21st century. At a farewell ceremony Thursday morning at the Justice Department, colleagues praised Mueller for his dedicated leadership and transformation of the once-embattled bureau. Mueller inherited an organization coping with scandals, including the discovery just months before that an agent was spying for the Russians, and that soon faced questions of its relevancy after 9/11.
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OPINION
November 1, 2013
Re "Filling up at public trough," Column, Oct. 30 Bravo to Steve Lopez for expressing disgust at the L.A. City Council proposal to increase the limit on the value of gifts that council members can accept. It brings to mind my experience with Robert Mueller when he served as the U.S. attorney for the Northern District of California, when I was the regional director of the Anti-Defamation League in San Francisco. While Mueller - who would leave in 2001 to head the FBI - was in San Francisco, my staff and I met him for lunch to offer the ADL's assistance in tracking the white-power extremists active in the region.
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NEWS
July 1, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush has yet to name a replacement for former FBI Director Louis J. Freeh, but the politicking has already begun both for and against a San Francisco prosecutor who has emerged as the leading contender to head an agency under siege. While the lobbying so far has been low-key as the White House mulls the selection, the stakes are enormous in determining who will lead an agency that once was regarded as the crown jewel of U.S. law enforcement but now has become distrusted by many.
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON -- Outgoing FBI director Robert Mueller began the job a week before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He prepares to step down from the position 12 years later in a world that has changed completely - and with it the agency, which Mueller is credited with guiding into the 21st century. At a farewell ceremony Thursday morning at the Justice Department, colleagues praised Mueller for his dedicated leadership and transformation of the once-embattled bureau. Mueller inherited an organization coping with scandals, including the discovery just months before that an agent was spying for the Russians, and that soon faced questions of its relevancy after 9/11.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
President Obama will ask Congress to extend the 10-year term of FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III, who took over a sometimes plodding bureau caught flat-footed by the Sept. 11 attacks and turned it into a fast-moving counter-terrorism agency. "In his 10 years at the FBI, Bob Mueller has set the gold standard for leading the bureau," Obama said in a statement Thursday. "I believe continuity and stability at the FBI is critical at this time," he added. Mueller, 66, told the president he was willing to stay for two more years.
OPINION
July 8, 2001
Robert Mueller has his marching order from President Bush, who has nominated the veteran prosecutor to be the next director of the FBI. He also faces the implicit commands of congressional critics to a bureau that has become better known in recent years for its scandals and blunders than for its successes. Mueller will be expected to impose a new management style to replace what even many of the FBI's longtime admirers now denounce as a culture of arrogance. Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | Associated Press
Robert Mueller, the new FBI director, is recovering from surgery for prostate cancer, a Justice Department official said Thursday. Mueller's prostate was removed Aug. 2. The operation went well and Mueller is expected to return to work next week, the official said. Mueller, 56, a federal prosecutor who was confirmed as FBI director last week, plans to start work at the bureau Sept. 4. He has been wrapping up his affairs in San Francisco, where he was U.S. attorney, the official said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001
It was bad enough when the FBI lost track of thousands of documents that should have been turned over to lawyers for Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh. Now comes the more embarrassing disclosure that over the last 11 years it has lost hundreds of weapons and laptop computers, some to theft, some to retired or fired employees who took equipment with them, some to sloppy inventory controls. Significantly, the survey of lost equipment didn't originate with the FBI.
NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced legislation Thursday that would grant President Obama's request to extend Robert Mueller's term as FBI director. Obama asked for the two-year extension earlier this month, calling Mueller the "gold standard for leading the bureau. " Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and ranking Republican Charles Grassley of Iowa brought the legislation along with Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.)
OPINION
November 1, 2013
Re "Filling up at public trough," Column, Oct. 30 Bravo to Steve Lopez for expressing disgust at the L.A. City Council proposal to increase the limit on the value of gifts that council members can accept. It brings to mind my experience with Robert Mueller when he served as the U.S. attorney for the Northern District of California, when I was the regional director of the Anti-Defamation League in San Francisco. While Mueller - who would leave in 2001 to head the FBI - was in San Francisco, my staff and I met him for lunch to offer the ADL's assistance in tracking the white-power extremists active in the region.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III testified Wednesday that the controversial National Security Agency surveillance program "has been a contributing factor, one dot among many dots" for tracking terrorist plots, and he admitted for the first time that the bureau had used surveillance drones inside the U.S. The FBI uses drones "in a very, very minimal way and very seldom," said Mueller, adding that "we have very few. " Mueller's comments...
NATIONAL
May 16, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The head of the FBI said Thursday that there were lapses in tracking accused Boston bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev's visit to Russia last year, saying that U.S. security officials failed to act on "text" alerts to a U.S. Customs agent about his trip. The inaction came after U.S. officials interviewed Tsarnaev and his parents about Russian concerns that he was traveling there "intent on returning and perhaps participating in jihad," FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III said. Mueller told a Senate appropriations subcommittee that in March 2011, Russian authorities asked the U.S. for a background assessment on Tsarnaev and his mother.
NEWS
May 26, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced legislation Thursday that would grant President Obama's request to extend Robert Mueller's term as FBI director. Obama asked for the two-year extension earlier this month, calling Mueller the "gold standard for leading the bureau. " Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and ranking Republican Charles Grassley of Iowa brought the legislation along with Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.)
NATIONAL
May 13, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
President Obama will ask Congress to extend the 10-year term of FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III, who took over a sometimes plodding bureau caught flat-footed by the Sept. 11 attacks and turned it into a fast-moving counter-terrorism agency. "In his 10 years at the FBI, Bob Mueller has set the gold standard for leading the bureau," Obama said in a statement Thursday. "I believe continuity and stability at the FBI is critical at this time," he added. Mueller, 66, told the president he was willing to stay for two more years.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
President Obama will ask Congress to allow Robert Mueller to stay on as FBI director for two more years, the White House announced Thursday. The requested extension comes as the White House has been searching for a successor to Mueller, whose 10-year term expires Sept. 4. The rare extension would give the administration more time and avoid any possibility of a confirmation battle. President Obama praised Mueller’s tenure, saying he has set “the gold standard” for leading the bureau.
NATIONAL
July 28, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Tribune Washington Bureau
An undisclosed number of FBI agents have cheated on tests on how to legally conduct domestic surveillance cases, FBI Director Robert S. Mueller acknowledged Wednesday, but he added that he is waiting for the results of an inspector general's investigation to determine how widespread the cheating has become. "I've got a general idea. But I do not know how many" have cheated, he said in testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee. "And I'm not sure the IG knows how many either."
NEWS
August 1, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Francisco prosecutor Robert S. Mueller, all but certain to be confirmed as the next head of the FBI, vowed Tuesday to hold himself personally responsible for any future spy flare-ups at the bureau in the wake of fired agent Robert Philip Hanssen's espionage. "Anything that happens or does not happen in the bureau, should I be confirmed, is my responsibility," Mueller said as he closed out two days of hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee on his nomination to be FBI director.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Lawmakers criticized FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III on Thursday for continued problems with a costly computer project that was supposed to dramatically improve management of terrorism and other criminal cases. Mueller acknowledged he did not know how much the FBI's Virtual Case File would cost beyond the $170 million already budgeted and largely spent, or when FBI agents and analysts would have it on their computers. After the attacks of Sept.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2009 | David G. Savage
The Supreme Court served notice Monday that it would set a high bar for anyone seeking to hold top government officials liable for abuse suffered by prisoners held as part of the Bush administration's war on terrorism. Justice Anthony M. Kennedy spoke for a 5-4 majority in throwing out a lawsuit against former Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft and FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III that claimed the two ordered the roundup of hundreds of Muslim men after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2008 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday vigorously challenged FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III for the bureau's handling of the anthrax mailings investigation, signaling that they were not convinced the case had been solved. Both the panel's Democratic chairman and its most senior Republican said that, based on what evidence they had seen, the FBI had not proved that the mailings were perpetrated solely by Bruce E.
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