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Robert Murray

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR
Residents with opinions on what kind of city manager should lead Thousand Oaks into the next century are invited to share their thoughts at the City Council meeting Tuesday. Robert Murray, a vice president with the David M. Griffith & Assoc. search firm, will present a report to the council detailing the results of his interviews with elected leaders, top city staff members and employees' unions about Thousand Oaks' search for a new city manager.
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HEALTH
September 12, 2011 | By Michelle Andrews, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Treating skinned knees and stomachaches is part of the drill at any school nurse's office or school-based health center. But healthcare providers at these sites do much more than treat everyday aches and pains: They give checkups and vaccinations, make sure kids take their insulin shots and antidepressants on time, and teach them how to manage chronic conditions such as asthma. School-based health centers go beyond the services of a school nurse. They are clinics that provide primary care to students, and often mental health and dental care as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Someone experienced, evenhanded, apolitical, fiscally conservative and good with the public. On Tuesday night, those were the qualities residents said they desire in Thousand Oaks' next city manager. "This is a helluva great city. It should be a plum of an assignment," said resident Raul Gutierrez, who said he wanted to see a city manager similar to Grant Brimhall, who retired from the post in February after serving for 20 years.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- On Wednesday, the Mitt Romney campaign released an ad spotlighting President Obama's putative "War On Coal," despite a controversy in Ohio about the coal miners' rally featured in the spot. In the ad, Romney appears on a stage before rows of hard-hatted miners, their faces smudged with coal dust, as he says, “We have 250 years of coal. Why wouldn't we use it?” The rally was held last month in Beallsville, Ohio, thick with miners from the Century coal mine, owned by Murray Energy, a major donor to Republican causes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1992 | DOUG McCLELLAN
Thousand Oaks City Manager Grant Brimhall is expected to answer a critic of the city's multimillion-dollar redevelopment program at tonight's meeting of a citizens group. The Citizens Q of L Action Alliance, founded by City Councilwoman Elois Zeanah, will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the Newbury Park Library on Borchard Road.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, This post has been updated.
WASHINGTON -- Employees of a major coal industry donor to Republican causes have raised complaints about their participation in an event earlier this month organized for GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in the crucial swing state of Ohio. Several miners at Murray Energy's Century coal mine in Beallsville, Ohio, contacted a nearby morning talk radio host, David Blomquist, over the last two weeks to say that they were forced to attend an Aug. 14 rally for Romney at the mine. Murray closed the mine the day of the rally, saying it was necessary for security and safety, then docked miners the day's pay. Asked by WWVA radio's Blomquist about the allegations on Monday's show, Murray chief operating officer Robert Moore said: “Attendance was mandatory but no one was forced to attend the event.” The Century mine is owned by Robert Murray, an enthusiastic Romney supporter and major contributor to the Republican Party on his own and through Murray Energy, one of the largest private coal companies in the U.S. Murray and his wife have given Republican candidates a total of $471,185 since the 2008 election, including the maximum of $5,000 each to Romney this year, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.
NEWS
January 22, 1992 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
According to a survey compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics: * Americans sniffled through nearly 61.5 million colds in 1990. * The average annual odds of catching a cold are about 1 in 4. * When it comes to colds, preschoolers are the biggest germ-mongers. For every 100 children under 5 surveyed, 65 had contracted a cold. Middle-agers (defined as ages 45-64) are the least likely, with only 14 of every 100.
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