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Robert N Noyce

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BUSINESS
July 28, 1988 | KEITH BRADSHER
A founding father and patriarch of Silicon Valley has been named chief executive of Sematech, a giant research consortium aimed at ensuring U.S. leadership in semiconductor manufacturing. Robert N. Noyce, vice chairman and co-founder of Intel Corp., will direct the consortium's 135-member staff, which is expected to expand to 800 people over the next several years. Austin, Tex.
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NEWS
October 25, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1948, a tiny electronic device called a transistor--the size of a pencil eraser--was presented to the world at a press conference at the headquarters of Bell Laboratories in New York City. It wasn't much of a press conference and it failed to create a buzz over this invention. Even the hometown paper, the New York Times, managed only a few paragraphs on the event in a column about radio news, giving top billing that day to the radio show "Our Miss Brooks."
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BUSINESS
March 19, 1987 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
The chief executive of Fairchild Semiconductor lashed out at his competitors Wednesday, accusing them of kindling "the fires of opposition" that led to the collapse of Fujitsu Ltd.'s plan to buy control of his company. Fairchild's Donald W. Brooks also said he expects industry leaders to oppose a new plan for the Japanese electronics giant and the Cupertino, Calif.-based chip maker to share technology and manufacturing instead of merging.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1988 | KEITH BRADSHER
A founding father and patriarch of Silicon Valley has been named chief executive of Sematech, a giant research consortium aimed at ensuring U.S. leadership in semiconductor manufacturing. Robert N. Noyce, vice chairman and co-founder of Intel Corp., will direct the consortium's 135-member staff, which is expected to expand to 800 people over the next several years. Austin, Tex.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1948, a tiny electronic device called a transistor--the size of a pencil eraser--was presented to the world at a press conference at the headquarters of Bell Laboratories in New York City. It wasn't much of a press conference and it failed to create a buzz over this invention. Even the hometown paper, the New York Times, managed only a few paragraphs on the event in a column about radio news, giving top billing that day to the radio show "Our Miss Brooks."
NEWS
June 22, 1985
Here was the vote on the proposal by Regent Willie Brown, Speaker of the Assembly, for full divestiture of University of California holdings in U.S. firms doing business in South Africa: For: Sheldon W. Andelson, Brown, Yvonne Brathwaite Burke, Fred N. Gaines, John Henning, state Superintendent of Public Instruction Bill Honig, Lt. Gov. Leo T. McCarthy, Stanley K. Sheinbaum and Yori Wada. Against: Glenn Campbell, Edward W. Carter, Frank W. Clark Jr., Gov. George Deukmejian, UC President David P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1985 | Jeffrey A. Perlman \f7
The Monarch Beach Institute, a new Orange County-based think tank--the brainchild of wealthy developer and Democratic Party activist David Stein--is scheduled to play host next week to three U.S. senators, the former U.S. ambassador to China, and representatives of 14 countries of the Pacific Rim. "Transitions in the Pacific Rim: Leadership for the Next 20 Years" is the theme of the conference, scheduled Thursday through Sunday at the Ritz Carlton hotel in Laguna Niguel.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
A group of businessmen and attorneys announced Wednesday that they will try, as a means of stemming the current insurance liability crisis, to qualify an initiative for the 1988 primary election that would require legal costs in lawsuits to be paid by losing parties who had refused settlement offers. "Our proposals will help reduce the number of speculative, frivolous claims and expedite genuine dispute resolution, hence cut costs for everyone," said Robert N.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1985 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan will be "leading the charge" for tax-reform legislation this year, Treasury Secretary James A. Baker III pledged Wednesday, although he repeatedly refused to tell a skeptical House committee what specific changes the Administration will seek. At the same time, in the first signs of business backing for tax reform, an influential group of business leaders joined a bipartisan drive for a simplified tax code with lower rates.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Skepticism and even some laughter by semiconductor executives greeted a rosy forecast of an 18% jump to near record sales in 1986 after the worst slump in the industry's history. The Semiconductor Industry Assn.'s official forecast last week of "a dramatic turnaround" next year, with worldwide sales surging to $25.5 billion, brought no promises of new hiring by companies which laid off thousands of workers in 1985.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1987 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
The chief executive of Fairchild Semiconductor lashed out at his competitors Wednesday, accusing them of kindling "the fires of opposition" that led to the collapse of Fujitsu Ltd.'s plan to buy control of his company. Fairchild's Donald W. Brooks also said he expects industry leaders to oppose a new plan for the Japanese electronics giant and the Cupertino, Calif.-based chip maker to share technology and manufacturing instead of merging.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Jack Kilby, the soft-spoken, 6-foot-6 engineer whose invention of the integrated circuit won him the Nobel Prize and launched the digital revolution, died Monday. He was 81. Kilby died of cancer at his home in Dallas, according to Texas Instruments, where he worked for most of his career. Kilby's research for Texas Instruments in 1958 led to the computer chip, which spawned a trillion-dollar global industry and transformed the way people live and work.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ and CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Robert N. Noyce, a modern-day Thomas Edison who helped usher in the Computer Age by co-inventing the semiconductor and later led an effort to restore America's leadership in computer chips, died Sunday morning of a heart attack. He was 62. The Silicon Valley pioneer was stricken at his home in Austin, Tex., and was rushed to Seton Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead minutes after his arrival, according to a hospital spokesman.
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