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Robert Nasraway

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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When he was a young architect in the early 1950s, Lou Naidorf of Welton Becket Associates was given the chance to design the Capitol Records Tower, today one of Hollywood's boldest landmarks. The world's first completely circular office building, Capitol Records was shaped to resemble a stack of 45-r.p.m. platters topped by a symbolic stylus. The tower's simple metaphor was deliberately designed to create an instant presence.
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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When he was a young architect in the early 1950s, Lou Naidorf of Welton Becket Associates was given the chance to design the Capitol Records Tower, today one of Hollywood's boldest landmarks. The world's first completely circular office building, Capitol Records was shaped to resemble a stack of 45-r.p.m. platters topped by a symbolic stylus. The tower's simple metaphor was deliberately designed to create an instant presence.
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BUSINESS
February 7, 1992 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Architect Philip M. Hove, who managed Berkus Group Architects' Orange County office since opening it 21 years ago, has joined CYP Inc. as senior vice president and principal in charge of the residential division. CYP, one of the county's largest full-service planning and architecture firms, was recently racked by the departure of co-founder Robert Yamafuji, who left with 19 other CYP officers and employees to start his own company.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Glendale Redevelopment Agency Tuesday granted preliminary approval for a 22-story office tower to be built at 500 N. Brand Blvd., a site that has been vacant for seven years. City officials said construction could begin in June, with completion expected by mid-1990. The $75-million project will add 425,000 square feet of new office and retail space in the downtown financial district.
REAL ESTATE
May 12, 1991 | LEON WHITESON, Whiteson is a Los Angeles free-lancer who writes on architectural topics.
Spring Street, known in grander days as the Wall Street of the West, has had a hard struggle over the past decade to regain some vestige of its former respectability. Bordered by Skid Row, divided from the new, largely Anglo, Bunker Hill commercial center by Latino Broadway, Spring Street still limps along, despite an infusion of $50 million in public money by the Community Redevelopment Agency.
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