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Robert Noyce

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NEWS
June 4, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ and CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Robert N. Noyce, a modern-day Thomas Edison who helped usher in the Computer Age by co-inventing the semiconductor and later led an effort to restore America's leadership in computer chips, died Sunday morning of a heart attack. He was 62. The Silicon Valley pioneer was stricken at his home in Austin, Tex., and was rushed to Seton Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead minutes after his arrival, according to a hospital spokesman.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Intel on Thursday announced Brian Krzanich has been selected to be the company's sixth chief executive, taking the helm of one of Silicon Valley's most iconic companies at a time when the company is struggling to gain traction in mobile computing. Krzanich, 52, will succeed Paul Otellini, who announced last fall he was stepping down. He assumes a seat that has been held by such valley giants as Andrew Grove.   PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013    Krzanich's selection continues a tradition at Intel of selecting a chief executive  from within its ranks, though there were rumors in recent months the company was considering outside candidates as well.  Currently serving as chief operating officer, Krzanich joined Intel in 1982.  The company also announced Renée James, currently e xecutive vice president and general manager of Intel's software and services group , will become president of Intel.
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BUSINESS
June 10, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
"Bob Noyce changed your life." That's how an electronics industry executive summed up the contribution of Robert N. Noyce--inventor of the integrated circuit, founder of Intel Corp. and pioneer of the industrial phenomenon known as Silicon Valley--who died a week ago. Noyce, who was chairman of the government-industry electronics consortium Sematech when he died of a heart attack at 62, exemplified enduring values in American business--and also reflected its current difficulties.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1948, a tiny electronic device called a transistor--the size of a pencil eraser--was presented to the world at a press conference at the headquarters of Bell Laboratories in New York City. It wasn't much of a press conference and it failed to create a buzz over this invention. Even the hometown paper, the New York Times, managed only a few paragraphs on the event in a column about radio news, giving top billing that day to the radio show "Our Miss Brooks."
BUSINESS
March 21, 1989 | From United Press International
Paul Castrucci resigned Monday as chief operating officer of Sematech in a dispute over management style with the high-tech consortium's president and chief executive, Robert Noyce. In a statement released by Sematech, Noyce said Castrucci quit because "it has become apparent that our individual management styles are not compatible." Turner Hasty, Sematech's director of external resources, will replace Castrucci temporarily.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Intel on Thursday announced Brian Krzanich has been selected to be the company's sixth chief executive, taking the helm of one of Silicon Valley's most iconic companies at a time when the company is struggling to gain traction in mobile computing. Krzanich, 52, will succeed Paul Otellini, who announced last fall he was stepping down. He assumes a seat that has been held by such valley giants as Andrew Grove.   PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013    Krzanich's selection continues a tradition at Intel of selecting a chief executive  from within its ranks, though there were rumors in recent months the company was considering outside candidates as well.  Currently serving as chief operating officer, Krzanich joined Intel in 1982.  The company also announced Renée James, currently e xecutive vice president and general manager of Intel's software and services group , will become president of Intel.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the beginning, life has been difficult for Sematech. For starters, the charter of the ambitious 3-year-old government-and-industry consortium--to breathe new life into the domestic chip business by developing and dispersing state-of-the-art technology--is enormous.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the clannish, contentious, creative world of Silicon Valley, there's a small group of men who occupy a special realm, the one reserved for the true patriarchs. They arrived three decades ago, a youthful band of hard-drinking, hard-driving, intelligent engineers and, working first in concert at Fairchild Semiconductor and later in competition at companies they founded, proceeded to build the computer chip industry. But the beginning of the 1990s marks a changing of the guard. Robert N.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1948, a tiny electronic device called a transistor--the size of a pencil eraser--was presented to the world at a press conference at the headquarters of Bell Laboratories in New York City. It wasn't much of a press conference and it failed to create a buzz over this invention. Even the hometown paper, the New York Times, managed only a few paragraphs on the event in a column about radio news, giving top billing that day to the radio show "Our Miss Brooks."
BUSINESS
October 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The semiconductor research consortium Sematech has named a top Xerox Corp. executive as its president and chief executive, officials announced today. William J. Spencer, 60, a veteran microelectronics researcher, will succeed Robert Noyce at Sematech's helm. Noyce died of a heart attack this summer. Spencer is the former group vice president and senior technical officer for Xerox Corp. in Stamford, Conn. He also previously managed Xerox's worldwide research activity.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the clannish, contentious, creative world of Silicon Valley, there's a small group of men who occupy a special realm, the one reserved for the true patriarchs. They arrived three decades ago, a youthful band of hard-drinking, hard-driving, intelligent engineers and, working first in concert at Fairchild Semiconductor and later in competition at companies they founded, proceeded to build the computer chip industry. But the beginning of the 1990s marks a changing of the guard. Robert N.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
"Bob Noyce changed your life." That's how an electronics industry executive summed up the contribution of Robert N. Noyce--inventor of the integrated circuit, founder of Intel Corp. and pioneer of the industrial phenomenon known as Silicon Valley--who died a week ago. Noyce, who was chairman of the government-industry electronics consortium Sematech when he died of a heart attack at 62, exemplified enduring values in American business--and also reflected its current difficulties.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the beginning, life has been difficult for Sematech. For starters, the charter of the ambitious 3-year-old government-and-industry consortium--to breathe new life into the domestic chip business by developing and dispersing state-of-the-art technology--is enormous.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ and CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Robert N. Noyce, a modern-day Thomas Edison who helped usher in the Computer Age by co-inventing the semiconductor and later led an effort to restore America's leadership in computer chips, died Sunday morning of a heart attack. He was 62. The Silicon Valley pioneer was stricken at his home in Austin, Tex., and was rushed to Seton Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead minutes after his arrival, according to a hospital spokesman.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1989 | From United Press International
Paul Castrucci resigned Monday as chief operating officer of Sematech in a dispute over management style with the high-tech consortium's president and chief executive, Robert Noyce. In a statement released by Sematech, Noyce said Castrucci quit because "it has become apparent that our individual management styles are not compatible." Turner Hasty, Sematech's director of external resources, will replace Castrucci temporarily.
NEWS
July 4, 1989
Gov. George Deukmejian appointed former Assemblyman William Bagley (R-San Rafael), a member of the state Transportation Commission, to the University of California Board of Regents. An attorney, Bagley, 61, served in the Legislature from 1960-74, representing Marin and Sonoma counties. He also was a member of the state Public Utilities Commission from 1983-86. Bagley replaces Meredith Khachigian of San Clemente, who was shifted to another position on the board.
MAGAZINE
December 2, 2001 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Michael A. Hiltzik last wrote for the magazine about how DVDs changed filmmaking
The event depicted in the photograph belongs to a familiar genre: the triumphal luncheon. At the head of a long table draped in white linen and covered with drained wine bottles and half-empty coffee cups sits Bill Shockley, square-jawed and grinning widely in a Hawaiian shirt, flanked by 11 of the smartest engineers and physicists in America. They are all on his payroll. It is Nov.
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