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Robert Olmstead

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1997
Robert Olmstead, a mechanic for the city of Santa Paula, died at his home Saturday. He was 44. Olmstead was born Dec. 23, 1952, in Los Angeles. He moved from Panorama City to Ventura County 19 years ago, drawn by the region's quiet lifestyle. Olmstead spent as much time as he could with his family, said his brother, David Olmstead of Ventura. "He was your typical working man, doing whatever he could to get a better life for his family," David Olmstead said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Far Bright Star A Novel Robert Olmstead Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill: 208 pp., $23.95 "Thus far the summer of 1916 had been a siege of wrathy wind and heated air. Dust and light. Sand and light. Wind and light." So begins the story of Napoleon Childs, hard-hearted U.S. cavalryman on a manhunt. Napoleon and his bedraggled men scour the mountains of Mexico in search of Pancho Villa. Robert Olmstead is a gorgeous writer, a master of regret. And it's far too late for Napoleon Childs to ask himself why. "The world's full of no-good people, he thought, and he included himself."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2007 | Andrew Welsh-Huggins, Associated Press
Robert Olmstead always considered his war the Revolutionary War when he was growing up on a farm in New England. It was not until he was teaching at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania that the novelist first visited Gettysburg, where he was transfixed by another great American conflict. He returned countless times on his own to the national military park, in the middle of the day and at midnight, and paid $25 to ride with battlefield guides while they drove his car and narrated history.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2007 | Andrew Welsh-Huggins, Associated Press
Robert Olmstead always considered his war the Revolutionary War when he was growing up on a farm in New England. It was not until he was teaching at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania that the novelist first visited Gettysburg, where he was transfixed by another great American conflict. He returned countless times on his own to the national military park, in the middle of the day and at midnight, and paid $25 to ride with battlefield guides while they drove his car and narrated history.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Far Bright Star A Novel Robert Olmstead Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill: 208 pp., $23.95 "Thus far the summer of 1916 had been a siege of wrathy wind and heated air. Dust and light. Sand and light. Wind and light." So begins the story of Napoleon Childs, hard-hearted U.S. cavalryman on a manhunt. Napoleon and his bedraggled men scour the mountains of Mexico in search of Pancho Villa. Robert Olmstead is a gorgeous writer, a master of regret. And it's far too late for Napoleon Childs to ask himself why. "The world's full of no-good people, he thought, and he included himself."
NEWS
April 10, 1996 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
A fifth-generation Vermont farmer, the grandfather in Robert Olmstead's memoir had put in 14-hour days all his life on the endless practical tasks demanded by his flourishing dairy spread. Now, near 70 and stricken with a cancer that would prove fatal, he was spending less time on the chores and more time giving orders and, like his 200 Holsteins, ruminating. "He was ready to sit down in his rocker again," Olmstead portrays him on one summer evening, "and go back to enjoying his mind.
BOOKS
May 23, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
AMERICA BY LAND: A Novel by Robert Olmstead (Random House: $20; 241 pp.) Robert Olmstead's third book is indeed a novel, as the subtitle says, but it's hard to tell whether "America by Land" is intended to be a serious work or updated pulp fiction. "Most of what's left behind is left behind," Olmstead writes at one point: "Out on the road you don't need what's left behind, unless you need it."
NEWS
April 17, 1989 | JACK MILES, Times Book Editor
Carolyn See, novelist and since 1981 a regular book reviewer for The Times, has won a Guggenheim Fellowship for fiction. The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation awards fellowships annually to artists, scholars and scientists "on the basis of unusually distinguished achievement in the past and exceptional promise for future accomplishment." This year's 198 winners, chosen from among 3,144 applicants, will receive awards totaling $5,251,000, according to an announcement by foundation president Joel Connarroe in New York earlier this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2003 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
A magazine long under wraps began showing up unannounced at a few independent bookstores this week, with an improbable name (The Believer) and a curious cover (touting Salman Rushdie's conversation with Terry Gilliam; the dark, indie band Interpol; and poet Anne Carson, a classics professor).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1997
Robert Olmstead, a mechanic for the city of Santa Paula, died at his home Saturday. He was 44. Olmstead was born Dec. 23, 1952, in Los Angeles. He moved from Panorama City to Ventura County 19 years ago, drawn by the region's quiet lifestyle. Olmstead spent as much time as he could with his family, said his brother, David Olmstead of Ventura. "He was your typical working man, doing whatever he could to get a better life for his family," David Olmstead said.
NEWS
April 10, 1996 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
A fifth-generation Vermont farmer, the grandfather in Robert Olmstead's memoir had put in 14-hour days all his life on the endless practical tasks demanded by his flourishing dairy spread. Now, near 70 and stricken with a cancer that would prove fatal, he was spending less time on the chores and more time giving orders and, like his 200 Holsteins, ruminating. "He was ready to sit down in his rocker again," Olmstead portrays him on one summer evening, "and go back to enjoying his mind.
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