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Robert Owen

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TRAVEL
May 7, 2006 | Douglas Wissing, Special to The Times
New Harmony, Ind. THIS place could be just another small Hoosier town basking on the banks of southern Indiana's Wabash River. It has a Victorian main street, cornfield-bordered basketball courts and Kiwanis Club meetings on Thursdays. But turn down a shady street and utopia shimmers in the soft Midwestern light. Austere 19th century frame houses with beautiful gardens reside beside massive Germanic brick buildings resonating with a sense of hope and order.
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TRAVEL
May 7, 2006 | Douglas Wissing, Special to The Times
New Harmony, Ind. THIS place could be just another small Hoosier town basking on the banks of southern Indiana's Wabash River. It has a Victorian main street, cornfield-bordered basketball courts and Kiwanis Club meetings on Thursdays. But turn down a shady street and utopia shimmers in the soft Midwestern light. Austere 19th century frame houses with beautiful gardens reside beside massive Germanic brick buildings resonating with a sense of hope and order.
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SPORTS
December 23, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
The special catch-and-release wild-trout fishing regulations applied to a section of the Lower Owens River north of Bishop this year have led to a surprising discovery. "The lower (water) flows in the Lower Owens have been a benefit to the fish population," says John Deinstadt, chief of the California Department of Fish and Game's wild-trout program. "This is a case where the drought has been better for the fish."
SPORTS
December 23, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS
The special catch-and-release wild-trout fishing regulations applied to a section of the Lower Owens River north of Bishop this year have led to a surprising discovery. "The lower (water) flows in the Lower Owens have been a benefit to the fish population," says John Deinstadt, chief of the California Department of Fish and Game's wild-trout program. "This is a case where the drought has been better for the fish."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1991 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oxnard Police Chief Robert Owens, who gained a reputation among his colleagues as an innovator and for being "more open-minded than the stereotypical cop," announced Tuesday he will retire June 15. In 25 years as police chief of the city with the highest crime rate in the county, Owens has fought gang violence and street crime with programs that earned him national recognition.
SPORTS
September 6, 1989 | Rich Roberts
The Lower Owens River Project was implemented in June of 1986 to release water from the Los Angeles Aqueduct and enhance the wetlands leading to long-dry Owens Lake. Edith Turner wonders what went wrong. "Before the project began, it was nothing to catch a limit of nice bass in a couple of hours," she wrote to the Inyo Register. "Now I can go weeks without even a hit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1991 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A search for a new Oxnard police chief will begin in earnest in January, and already a half dozen candidates are knocking at the door. Among the candidates are two from Los Angeles County, two from Ventura County and one from central California, Oxnard Police Chief Robert P. Owens said in a recent interview. He declined to identify them. Oxnard Assistant Police Chief James A. Latimer, 52, also has told his boss that he wants to succeed him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1992 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 60 law enforcement officials, two-thirds of them from California, are vying to become Oxnard's next top cop. And Roger Storey, a recruiting consultant advising Oxnard officials on a successor to longtime Police Chief Robert P. Owens, expects a final flurry of inquiries before today's application deadline. "The best applicants wait until the last few days to get their applications in," he said this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1992 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
June marks the last hurrah for two nationally known Southern California police chiefs. For Daryl F. Gates of the Los Angeles Police Department, the tumult and bitterness between the chief and City Hall have taken ugly and shrill turns during his final days in office. For Robert P. Owens of the Oxnard Police Department, the opposite was true as he quietly walked out of his office Friday for the last time, carrying with him accolades from his officers and the community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1992 | PEGGY Y. LEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 45-year-old assistant chief from Phoenix has been selected as Oxnard's new police chief, city officials said Sunday. Harold Hurtt, a 24-year veteran of the Phoenix police force, will replace retiring Chief Robert P. Owens, said Oxnard City Manager Vernon Hazen. "The department has a great reputation, and I think my biggest challenge will be to see it doesn't deteriorate in its standards," said Hurtt, who will be the city's first black chief. "We're delighted," Hazen said. "He was the No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1992 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
June marks the last hurrah for two nationally known Southern California police chiefs. For Daryl F. Gates of the Los Angeles Police Department, the tumult and bitterness between the chief and City Hall have taken ugly and shrill turns during his final days in office. For Robert P. Owens of the Oxnard Police Department, the opposite was true as he quietly walked out of his office Friday for the last time, carrying with him accolades from his officers and the community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1992 | PEGGY Y. LEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 45-year-old assistant chief from Phoenix has been selected as Oxnard's new police chief, city officials said Sunday. Harold Hurtt, a 24-year veteran of the Phoenix police force, will replace retiring Chief Robert P. Owens, said Oxnard City Manager Vernon Hazen. "The department has a great reputation, and I think my biggest challenge will be to see it doesn't deteriorate in its standards," said Hurtt, who will be the city's first black chief. "We're delighted," Hazen said. "He was the No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1992 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 60 law enforcement officials, two-thirds of them from California, are vying to become Oxnard's next top cop. And Roger Storey, a recruiting consultant advising Oxnard officials on a successor to longtime Police Chief Robert P. Owens, expects a final flurry of inquiries before today's application deadline. "The best applicants wait until the last few days to get their applications in," he said this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1991 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A search for a new Oxnard police chief will begin in earnest in January, and already a half dozen candidates are knocking at the door. Among the candidates are two from Los Angeles County, two from Ventura County and one from central California, Oxnard Police Chief Robert P. Owens said in a recent interview. He declined to identify them. Oxnard Assistant Police Chief James A. Latimer, 52, also has told his boss that he wants to succeed him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1991 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oxnard Police Chief Robert Owens, who gained a reputation among his colleagues as an innovator and for being "more open-minded than the stereotypical cop," announced Tuesday he will retire June 15. In 25 years as police chief of the city with the highest crime rate in the county, Owens has fought gang violence and street crime with programs that earned him national recognition.
SPORTS
September 6, 1989 | Rich Roberts
The Lower Owens River Project was implemented in June of 1986 to release water from the Los Angeles Aqueduct and enhance the wetlands leading to long-dry Owens Lake. Edith Turner wonders what went wrong. "Before the project began, it was nothing to catch a limit of nice bass in a couple of hours," she wrote to the Inyo Register. "Now I can go weeks without even a hit."
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | Reuters
Robert Owen, a self-described courier in the supply network run by former White House aide Oliver L. North to assist the Nicaraguan Contras, testified today before the grand jury investigating the Iran-Contra affair. Owen, who received immunity from prosecution, appeared before the grand jury investigating whether criminal laws were broken by the efforts to aid the Contras at a time when Congress had banned U.S. military assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1988
I was expecting it--and on Aug. 28, there it was: the front-page apologia for the media's treatment of poor Dan Quayle. Seems to me that the press hasn't dug into Quayle nearly so thoroughly as it ought to. Where were the front-page headlines about Quayle and Paula Parkinson? We sure saw a lot about Gary Hart and Donna Rice! In point of fact, the evidence against Hart was much less damning--Rice never made a tape-recorded confession to an FBI investigator. Suddenly, however, The Times has decided that such stories are beneath the dignity of responsible journalism.
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