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November 2, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar was sentenced Thursday to six months in prison for obstruction of justice for lying to FBI agents and leaking word to an aging mobster that he was being wiretapped. U.S. District Judge Louis Bechtle of Philadelphia imposed far less prison time than prosecutors had sought. But he told Aguilar that an obstruction of justice conviction "by a judge, no less, is a chilling message indeed."
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NEWS
June 25, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government Monday dropped its 7-year-old criminal prosecution of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar--the first federal judge ever indicted in California--in exchange for Aguilar's immediate resignation from the bench. In January, a federal appeals court paved the way for the agreement by overturning Aguilar's sole remaining conviction, on charges of disclosing wiretap information. The U.S. Justice Department had until Monday to decide whether to appeal to the Supreme Court.
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NEWS
June 25, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government Monday dropped its 7-year-old criminal prosecution of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar--the first federal judge ever indicted in California--in exchange for Aguilar's immediate resignation from the bench. In January, a federal appeals court paved the way for the agreement by overturning Aguilar's sole remaining conviction, on charges of disclosing wiretap information. The U.S. Justice Department had until Monday to decide whether to appeal to the Supreme Court.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated the criminal conviction of the first federal judge in California to be found guilty of a felony. On an 8-1 vote, the high court upheld the conviction of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar of San Jose for disclosing an FBI wiretap to an ex-mobster. The judge, a 1980 appointee of then-President Jimmy Carter, is still receiving a salary and is handling settlement conferences.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In opening statements Thursday in the trial of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar, prosecutors contended that he sought to use his position to sway fellow judges, while Aguilar's lawyer charged a "reactionary" federal Administration targeted him because of his liberal rulings. Prosecutor Ralph D. Martin said Aguilar, appointed to the federal bench in 1980, engaged in an eight-year "pattern of racketeering."
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Tuesday reversed the convictions of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar for obstructing justice and leaking word to an aging mobster that he was being wiretapped by the Justice Department. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Aguilar's conduct did not violate the federal laws he was charged with breaking. Unless the Supreme Court overrules the 9th Circuit decision, the charges against the San Jose judge will be dismissed.
NEWS
July 11, 1989
U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar, indicted on charges of conspiring to obstruct justice and racketeering, pleaded not guilty in the same San Francisco federal courthouse where he took his oath of office nine years ago. Visiting U.S. District Judge Howard Bratton of Albuquerque, N.M., allowed Aguilar, 58, to remain free without bail. Aguilar's co-defendants, Rudy Tham, 66, and Abe Chapman, 83, also pleaded not guilty.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prosecutors in the corruption retrial of federal Judge Robert P. Aguilar concluded their case with the testimony of Aguilar's colleague, Robert F. Peckham, former chief judge for the Northern California federal court district, and two FBI agents. Peckham and the agents who followed as defense witnesses testified that in the summer of 1987, the FBI agents saw Aguilar, 59, lunching with Abe Chapman, 84, a self-described mob hit man in the 1930s who also had several drug convictions.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vera Hoff, a key witness in the racketeering case against federal Judge Robert P. Aguilar, is embroiled in a dispute with prosecutors over what she claims is their failure to help her get out of prison as they promised. In court documents obtained Thursday, Hoff, 65, claimed her cooperation has "gone completely unrewarded," and she hinted that she is cooling to the idea of testifying against Aguilar, a friend who in the past was her employer and her attorney.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Testifying in his own defense Monday, U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar said the activities that led to his indictment on racketeering and corruption charges were actually innocent efforts to help friends, relatives and acquaintances. Aguilar, the first federal judge ever charged with racketeering, said he had a long historyof offering advice to anyone who asked for it, including law students he hardly knew. He said that this helpfulness, not any criminal intent, is behind his problems.
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Tuesday reversed the convictions of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar for obstructing justice and leaking word to an aging mobster that he was being wiretapped by the Justice Department. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Aguilar's conduct did not violate the federal laws he was charged with breaking. Unless the Supreme Court overrules the 9th Circuit decision, the charges against the San Jose judge will be dismissed.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Justice Department has asked a federal appeals court to add about two years to the six-month prison sentence of U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar, convicted of leaking a wiretap and lying to the FBI. In papers filed this week with the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, a federal prosecutor challenged a trial judge's decision to reduce Aguilar's sentence below the standard term for the crimes because of the ordeal awaiting him in removal from office and disbarment as a lawyer.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An 84-year-old former relative of U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar pleaded guilty to conspiracy in the case that led to Aguilar's downfall. Abe Chapman, who was once related to Aguilar by marriage, pleaded guilty to conspiring to seek Aguilar's illicit intervention with another federal judge in 1988 to get a new embezzlement trial for Chapman's friend, former Teamster leader Rudy Tham. Tham was convicted of conspiracy and obstruction of justice in a separate trial.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar was sentenced Thursday to six months in prison for obstruction of justice for lying to FBI agents and leaking word to an aging mobster that he was being wiretapped. U.S. District Judge Louis Bechtle of Philadelphia imposed far less prison time than prosecutors had sought. But he told Aguilar that an obstruction of justice conviction "by a judge, no less, is a chilling message indeed."
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | From United Press International
U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar, convicted of leaking wiretap information and lying to the FBI, has elected to immediately relinquish his cases, Chief Judge William Ingram said Thursday. Ingram said Aguilar called him shortly after jurors announced their verdict Wednesday and said he had decided to surrender his remaining 70 civil cases currently pending in the San Jose trial court. Aguilar gave up more than 300 criminal cases after his indictment in 1989.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar was convicted Wednesday of obstruction of justice for lying to the FBI and for alerting an aging mobster that he was under surveillance. Aguilar becomes the first federal judge in California to be found guilty of criminal wrongdoing.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated the criminal conviction of the first federal judge in California to be found guilty of a felony. On an 8-1 vote, the high court upheld the conviction of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar of San Jose for disclosing an FBI wiretap to an ex-mobster. The judge, a 1980 appointee of then-President Jimmy Carter, is still receiving a salary and is handling settlement conferences.
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