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Robert P Gale

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May 5, 1988 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
Since his first official house call to the Soviet Union in the spring of 1986, Dr. Robert Peter Gale, the 42-year-old UCLA bone-marrow transplant specialist, has become nothing short of an international celebrity. As the physician who led the international "rescue team" that helped treat victims of the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident, Gale has been a darling of the news media for two years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993
Dr. Robert Gale, a bone marrow transplant pioneer who gained international renown for his treatment of victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, is leaving his full-time post at UCLA to work for a private health care provider. Gale, who was instrumental in developing UCLA's bone marrow transplant center, will join Salick Health Care, which operates nine cancer centers nationwide and provides services to patients who need organ transplants or have chronic illnesses. He begins his new job Sept.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993
Dr. Robert Gale, a bone marrow transplant pioneer who gained international renown for his treatment of victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, is leaving his full-time post at UCLA to work for a private health care provider. Gale, who was instrumental in developing UCLA's bone marrow transplant center, will join Salick Health Care, which operates nine cancer centers nationwide and provides services to patients who need organ transplants or have chronic illnesses. He begins his new job Sept.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
Since his first official house call to the Soviet Union in the spring of 1986, Dr. Robert Peter Gale, the 42-year-old UCLA bone-marrow transplant specialist, has become nothing short of an international celebrity. As the physician who led the international "rescue team" that helped treat victims of the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident, Gale has been a darling of the news media for two years.
MAGAZINE
July 5, 1987
On the second page of the article you had Dr. Robert P. Gale pose the question of whether Dr. Hammer is a self-promoter, and only on the fifth did you print Gale's answer: that, in his opinion, the man is sincere. Truly I am sad. Pearl Mirman Beverly Hills
NEWS
August 5, 1986
Dr. Robert P. Gale, a UCLA bone marrow specialist, said the death toll from the Soviet Union's Chernobyl nuclear disaster on April 26 has risen to 30, confirming reports of Western journalists who found two new graves in a special cemetery plot near Moscow for Chernobyl victims. Gale, who has just completed another Soviet visit to help treat Chernobyl victims, was interviewed in Tel Aviv.
NEWS
May 25, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Dr. Robert P. Gale, the UCLA bone marrow transplant specialist who treated radiation victims of the Chernobyl nuclear accident, left Los Angeles on Saturday for his second trip to the Soviet Union. Speaking at a brief news conference at International Airport before boarding a flight for Moscow, Gale said his first priority would be to care for the 24 critically ill people who have suffered most from radiation.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A woman who has been prevented from traveling to Israel to offer her bone marrow for a transplant needed by her cancer-stricken brother began a protest hunger strike here Saturday, her husband said. Viktor Flerov, a physicist, said that his wife, Inessa Flerova, started on a water-only diet after an inconclusive meeting Saturday with R. A. Kuznetsov, head of the Soviet visa office.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The death toll in the Chernobyl nuclear accident has climbed to 23 and "a small number of additional fatalities" are expected, American bone marrow transplant specialist Robert P. Gale said Thursday. The latest figures represent an increase of four from the previous total announced Monday at a news conference and includes 21 deaths from radiation and two from the original explosion and fire, the UCLA doctor said.
NEWS
June 27, 1987 | From Reuters
Another Chernobyl-type nuclear disaster is unavoidable while present technology is operated by human beings, a U.S. scientist specializing in the aftereffects of nuclear accidents said Friday. Dr. Robert P.
NEWS
June 8, 1986 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
The UCLA bone marrow specialist who won Soviet approval for the lifelong monitoring of 100,000 potential victims of the Chernobyl nuclear accident said here Saturday that he is confident that the National Institutes of Health and the National Academy of Sciences will join in the study. "It is hard to imagine that there is any physician or scientist who would would not be eager to participate," Dr. Robert P.
NEWS
May 1, 1986 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
The nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union has focused attention on a virtually unknown pool of about 75,000 persons in the United States, Britain and Scandinavia who are on call to donate bone marrow for medical emergencies, including ones at nuclear power plants.
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