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Robert Palm

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2000 | JAMES ENDRST, HARTFORD COURANT
Though he is usually about 3,000 miles from the scene of the crimes on NBC's New York-based "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," Robert Palm is pretty much running the show. It's no small task on many levels, but the Hartford, Conn.-born-and-raised television executive has it down by now. Though Dick Wolf, creator and executive producer of the Emmy-winning "Law & Order" and the "Special Victims Unit" spinoff, is ultimately the boss, it's Palm who keeps this challenging new series on track.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2000 | JAMES ENDRST, HARTFORD COURANT
Though he is usually about 3,000 miles from the scene of the crimes on NBC's New York-based "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," Robert Palm is pretty much running the show. It's no small task on many levels, but the Hartford, Conn.-born-and-raised television executive has it down by now. Though Dick Wolf, creator and executive producer of the Emmy-winning "Law & Order" and the "Special Victims Unit" spinoff, is ultimately the boss, it's Palm who keeps this challenging new series on track.
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BUSINESS
October 15, 1985 | Associated Press
The richest of the rich in America is worth $2.8 billion, while the poorest of the rich checks in at a mere $150 million. But who's counting? Forbes magazine, that's who, and its 1985 list of the nation's 400 richest people is topped by Sam Moore Walton of Bentonville, Ark., who has made $2.8 billion through his Wal-Mart discount stores. Walton, who danced a hula on Wall Street last year when profit goals were met, replaced Gordon Getty, the front-runner for the past two years.
OPINION
December 13, 2001
Your Dec. 11 front-page picture showing the haunting face of Shannon Spann cradling her baby while following her husband's coffin hit me in the gut. (He was CIA officer Johnny "Mike" Spann, who was killed in Afghanistan.) It speaks more eloquently of the tragedy of war than a thousand-word essay. Robert Hallock Palm Desert
OPINION
February 23, 2013
Re “ Sneak peek fees pique studios ,” Business, Feb. 19 Thank you for reporting on this irritating new practice, whereby studios are being strong-armed by theaters into paying to have trailers screened. Studios and theater owners decry losing audience share, but when they subject their audiences to 20 minutes or more of trailers, what do they expect? I, for one, will express my displeasure by always choosing an independent theater. Laurie Trainor Los Angeles Recently I sat through more than 20 painful minutes of inane trailers.
SPORTS
January 25, 1997
Curt Flood died Monday. His funeral should be attended by every professional baseball player. It is from his unyielding stand on principle they now enjoy unparalleled income and freedom. How many of us would be willing to surrender both fame and fortune at the height of stardom for an honorable principle? A principle for which you will be vilified by your enemies and little appreciated by your friends. Curt Flood chose to fight the injustice of baseball's reserve system knowing that even if by some miracle he won, his career would be over.
OPINION
August 29, 2002
Re "A Shot Across the Bow From the Darkness," Commentary, Aug. 26: Reading Jonathan Turley's article on the secret court, I wonder why every American citizen isn't outraged by the existence of that court. And why isn't every member of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives outraged by the existence of that court and its misuse by our current attorney general? And why isn't every media outlet expressing outrage at the false applications for secret searches submitted to that court by the Justice Department?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008 | Paul Young
Barbara Kruger's "Untitled (Shafted)" in the elevator of the Broad Contemporary Art Museum is one of three commissioned artworks on the grounds. (The others are John Baldessari's scrims on the building's facade and Robert Irwin's Palm Garden. And there's a fourth if you count Chris Burden's "Urban Light," which began in 2001.) Given that the three-floor building is the equivalent of six stories, Kruger's installation proved to be one of the thorniest, since it fills the interior of the elevator shaft and cannot be viewed all at once.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
"Fargo" is coming back as a TV series. But viewers shouldn't confuse the FX series with the Oscar-winning 1996 film from Ethan and Joel Coen. The new series will be a limited drama series inspired by the film that will feature an all-new true crime story with new characters established in the trademark humor, dialect, murder and "Minnesota nice" of the original film. The 10-part series will premiere April 15. The character of Marge Gunderson, the pregnant law enforcement officer played by Frances McDormand in an Oscar-winning performance, will not be a part of the new series.  TRAILERS: Winter TV 2014 Key to the new "Fargo" will be the feel of the Minnesota region, where people "have an inability to communicate," said Noah Hawley, executive producer and writer of all the episodes.
OPINION
January 7, 2001
Bertram Wolfe and Chauncy Starr ("State's Energy Problem Has Roots Nationwide," Commentary, Jan. 3) assume that demand for energy will continue to grow uncontrollably and that we should try to satisfy it at all costs, even if this means building more nuclear power plants. But the problem lies only partly with the limited supply of energy. As long as it was cheap, we were not careful with how we used it. Conservation should be our main focus in this energy crisis, for it is the only solution that is inexpensive, reduces our dependence on foreign governments and cartels and poses absolutely no environmental threats.
NEWS
March 7, 2004 | Kate O'Hare, Special to The Times
In the summer of 2002, USA premiered two series with two things in common: Both began life at other networks and both featured damaged individuals overcoming their difficulties to help others. In "The Dead Zone," adapted from the novel by Stephen King (and originally developed for UPN), coma victim Johnny Smith (Anthony Michael Hall) awakens with psychic powers that he tries to use for good intentions. In "Monk," originally developed for ABC, Det.
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