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November 11, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT
British singer Robert Palmer, who opened a two-night engagement Wednesday at the Universal Amphitheatre, still looks more like a haughty GQ cover boy than rock 'n' roller. With his sophisticated manner and immaculately tailored suits, he comes across as an aristocratic playboy who's slumming among the sloven rock crowd. Palmer has never seemed at home singing blues or rowdy rock. He's a reserved, not particularly graceful performer, his moves consisting mostly of a clumsy little shuffle.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Robert Palmer, the suave British rock singer who rose to stardom in the mid-1980s with his sexy rocker "Addicted to Love," died of a heart attack Friday. He was 54. Palmer died in his room in a luxury hotel in Paris, where he was taking a two-day break after a TV recording session in England, his manager said. In a solo recording career that began in 1974, Palmer did not have his first Top 10 single as a solo artist until "Addicted to Love" a dozen years later.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT
Deep down, Palmer probably hates rock 'n' roll: It's probably just a means to an end for the dapper Englishman. He sings it rather dispassionately most of the time, although his two big rock hits, "Addicted to Love" and "Simply Irresistible" are exceptions. Palmer knows that if he throws a couple of rock songs on his albums, he can probably continue racking up best-sellers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1992 | DENNIS HUNT and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four (excellent).
* * Robert Palmer, "Ridin' High," EMI. Palmer's pop-rock-soul albums used to be spiced with a few intriguing oldies, vintage 1920-50. This time he's recorded a whole album of that material with big-band arrangements. He gives these songs the Palmer imprint, crooning in his oddball jazzy style--soft, nearly deadpan, largely anti-melodic. Curiously, he also drains the life of out most of them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Robert Palmer, the suave British rock singer who rose to stardom in the mid-1980s with his sexy rocker "Addicted to Love," died of a heart attack Friday. He was 54. Palmer died in his room in a luxury hotel in Paris, where he was taking a two-day break after a TV recording session in England, his manager said. In a solo recording career that began in 1974, Palmer did not have his first Top 10 single as a solo artist until "Addicted to Love" a dozen years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | CHRIS WILLMAN
** 1/2 ROBERT PALMER. "Heavy Nova." EMI-Manhattan. You've gotta love a guy who's singing heavy-metal dance music one moment and yodeling (!) against a fiddle backdrop the next. That's Robert Palmer, the King of Suave Rock, back with another cross-cultural rock 'n' romance extravaganza, this one featuring the influences of Brazil and Soweto, as well as renditions of songs made famous by Peggy Lee, the Gap Band and Jermaine Jackson.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Veteran dance music master Robert Palmer, on the etiquette of '60s rock stars: "Absolutely disgusting . . . I could not believe how these people behaved. It was outrageous. I still can't see any excuse for the behavior that went on--trashing hotel rooms, et cetera. I couldn't see anything glamorous about it at all."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1992 | DENNIS HUNT and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four (excellent).
* * Robert Palmer, "Ridin' High," EMI. Palmer's pop-rock-soul albums used to be spiced with a few intriguing oldies, vintage 1920-50. This time he's recorded a whole album of that material with big-band arrangements. He gives these songs the Palmer imprint, crooning in his oddball jazzy style--soft, nearly deadpan, largely anti-melodic. Curiously, he also drains the life of out most of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Sunday night at 6, MTV will broadcast highlights of a benefit concert U2 gave in London last Sunday to raise money for the Jamaican Hurricane Relief Fund. Operators will be available via toll-free telephone numbers to take pledges for the fund from viewers. The broadcast will also include performances by Robert Palmer, Keith Richards, Ziggy Marley, Eddie Grant, Boy George, Tom Tom Club, Robert Cray and Erasure.
NEWS
May 30, 1985
A United Airlines Boeing 747 blew five of 18 tires on landing at San Francisco International Airport on Tuesday night because of a malfunctioning brake mechanism. Robert Palmer, a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, said a lengthy examination of Flight 180 from Honolulu determined that there was a minor malfunction of the brakes' anti-skid system, which prevents the plane's wheels from locking no matter how much pressure is exerted on the brakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1991 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The contrast between the virtual anonymity he suffered for years while doing multifaceted, yeoman work, and the recent success he has had with beefed-up, slicked-down funk-rock, might lead one to conclude that Robert Palmer opted for the same path of least resistance trod by such current sellouts as Steve Winwood and Peter Gabriel. T'ain't so.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT
Deep down, Palmer probably hates rock 'n' roll: It's probably just a means to an end for the dapper Englishman. He sings it rather dispassionately most of the time, although his two big rock hits, "Addicted to Love" and "Simply Irresistible" are exceptions. Palmer knows that if he throws a couple of rock songs on his albums, he can probably continue racking up best-sellers.
BOOKS
December 11, 1988 | Rene Engel, Engel is the producer/host of "Citybilly," heard on FM 89.3 KPCC Monday evenings at 8. and
They call it "country." Defining country music has always been elusive to the listening public, yet, today it is bigger than ever. Its influence on musicians in all genres is being acknowledged to the greatest degree, and country music is winning more adherents every day. "Country" leaves no stone unturned in illuminating what country music has been, from its folk origins, to what it has become, an industry annually worth more than $200 million....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT
British singer Robert Palmer, who opened a two-night engagement Wednesday at the Universal Amphitheatre, still looks more like a haughty GQ cover boy than rock 'n' roller. With his sophisticated manner and immaculately tailored suits, he comes across as an aristocratic playboy who's slumming among the sloven rock crowd. Palmer has never seemed at home singing blues or rowdy rock. He's a reserved, not particularly graceful performer, his moves consisting mostly of a clumsy little shuffle.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Sunday night at 6, MTV will broadcast highlights of a benefit concert U2 gave in London last Sunday to raise money for the Jamaican Hurricane Relief Fund. Operators will be available via toll-free telephone numbers to take pledges for the fund from viewers. The broadcast will also include performances by Robert Palmer, Keith Richards, Ziggy Marley, Eddie Grant, Boy George, Tom Tom Club, Robert Cray and Erasure.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Though there hasn't been much hysteria over Def Leppard, this pop/metal band has quietly had a phenomenal year. Its "Hysteria" album, which has sold more than 5 million units, moved into the No. 1 spot of the Billboard magazine pop Top 10--after 49 weeks on the chart. Remarkably, 48 of those weeks have been in the Top 10. The band's No. 2 single, "Pour Some Sugar on Me," is fueling the album's latest surge. Robert Palmer's fast-rising new album, "Heavy Nova," (No.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1985 | CRAIG LEE
"WHAT IS THIS." What Is This. MCA. After years of slugging in out on the local club circuit, where it was labeled musically sophisticated but too "arty" for mainstream consumption, it looks like What Is This is about to have a bona-fide hit with its streamlined, straightforward remake of the Spinners' sophisti-soul classic, "I'll Be Around."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1991 | JOHN D'AGOSTINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The contrast between the virtual anonymity he suffered for years while doing multifaceted, yeoman work, and the recent success he has had with beefed-up, slicked-down funk-rock, might lead one to conclude that Robert Palmer opted for the same path of least resistance trod by such current sellouts as Steve Winwood and Peter Gabriel. T'ain't so.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | CHRIS WILLMAN
** 1/2 ROBERT PALMER. "Heavy Nova." EMI-Manhattan. You've gotta love a guy who's singing heavy-metal dance music one moment and yodeling (!) against a fiddle backdrop the next. That's Robert Palmer, the King of Suave Rock, back with another cross-cultural rock 'n' romance extravaganza, this one featuring the influences of Brazil and Soweto, as well as renditions of songs made famous by Peggy Lee, the Gap Band and Jermaine Jackson.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Veteran dance music master Robert Palmer, on the etiquette of '60s rock stars: "Absolutely disgusting . . . I could not believe how these people behaved. It was outrageous. I still can't see any excuse for the behavior that went on--trashing hotel rooms, et cetera. I couldn't see anything glamorous about it at all."
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