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Robert Paris

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BUSINESS
June 18, 2001 | KAREN E. KLEIN
Robert Paris, 44, worked in the mail-order department of a record store while attending Cal State Northridge. As he pursued a business degree, he discovered an unusual market niche: selling records and cassettes to prison inmates. He started a mail-order business aimed at prisoners, added CDs to his catalog and found himself in a narrow and protected market. Through the years, Paris has relied on his business education and learned how to finesse relationships with vendors and institutions.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 2001 | KAREN E. KLEIN
Robert Paris, 44, worked in the mail-order department of a record store while attending Cal State Northridge. As he pursued a business degree, he discovered an unusual market niche: selling records and cassettes to prison inmates. He started a mail-order business aimed at prisoners, added CDs to his catalog and found himself in a narrow and protected market. Through the years, Paris has relied on his business education and learned how to finesse relationships with vendors and institutions.
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SPORTS
September 13, 1993 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sam Grayeli felt he had something to prove this summer, and he found the perfect forum in which to present his case. Grayeli had been instrumental in helping Costa Mesa to a Southern Section water polo championship in 1992 but he worried that because the title came in Division III, its importance might be diminished. Grayeli wanted the kind of recognition that is usually reserved for players at bigger schools, so he jumped at the opportunity to compete for a spot on the U.S. national youth team.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Chasing Aphrodite: The Hunt for Looted Antiquities at the World's Richest Museum Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 375 pp., $28 What on earth were they thinking? That's the question that comes repeatedly to mind while reading this scathing account of the Getty Museum's ethically dubious activities in the antiquities market over the course of more than a quarter-century. Expanding on their Los Angeles Times series, which made them finalists for the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting, Jason Felch and Ralph Frammolino show Getty staff members time and again engaging in transactions so obviously risky (as well as wrong)
FOOD
December 22, 1985 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
An ode to the potato? No, that's not a work by Lord Byron or Percy Bysshe Shelley. It's a dinner honoring the humble vegetable. This potato work was performed by chef Jacques Maximin, considered France's premier chef. He was recently at Antoine's at the Meridien hotel in Newport Beach in his capacity as consulting chef of the hotel chain, supervising the meal from the kitchen of his protege, executive chef Bruno Cirino.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Harvey Weinstein is the force to be reckoned with in the independent film world. He and his brother Bob run Miramax Films, which financed (with help from parent company Disney) the Oscar-dominating "The English Patient" and also had a box-office success with the Japanese import "Shall We Dance?" It is Harvey, as he is universally known, who is the public face of the company, and it is not a simple face to read.
BOOKS
December 4, 2005 | Geoff Dyer, Geoff Dyer is the author, most recently, of a book about photography, "The Ongoing Moment."
PHOTOGRAPHY is an abundant medium. In the movies, at least, photographers never take a single picture; they always shoot a whole roll. Unlike painting, it's as easy to do 10 pictures as it is to do one. Take enough photos and at least a couple of them will turn out OK. (What's more, the potential reproducibility of those images is inherent in the definition of the medium.) In poetry or prose, a relatively small output poses no critical difficulties.
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