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Robert Parker

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NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
You'd think it would have happened sooner, but wine critic Robert Parker has just released a mobile app that gives subscribers to eRobertParker.com access to thousands of Parker and company's tasting notes. Thirty-four years' worth, in fact. It's free, and there's a version for iPhones, Windows phones and Android devices. IPad and tablet apps will show up later this year. The searchable database encompasses more than 230,000 professional wine reviews from wine regions all over the world, with “approximately 4,000 new notes being added with each bimonthly issue....” You can search by vintage, by varietal, by producer and, what's all-important to Parker subscribers, by rating.  So, for all those wine buffs who wouldn't think of drinking a bottle that garnered fewer than 90 points, it's possible to filter out everything with inferior scores and render a search result that includes only wines with those sought-after high scores.  The wine's retail price will pop up too, and so will a feature called “Find It Online.”  At the moment, the iPhone App store has just two reviews for the app. The first declares the app “Awesome!
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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
When I saw the first tweet about this, I truly thought it was a hoax. But no, it seems wine critic Robert M. Parker Jr. is launching a lifestyle magazine. Wine-searcher.com has the story and describes the mag as aimed at "high net-worth individuals and corporate leaders. " In other words, Robb Report territory. And what will his new magazine be called? It's not hard to guess: “100 Points by Robert Parker.” Oh, no. Oh, yes. John Stimpfig reports that The Wine Advocate has signed a deal with publishers Hubert Burda Media to publish the new international lifestyle magazine quarterly.
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NEWS
February 24, 1999 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Parker tasted 30 wines this morning--a small number by his standards. But it's only early afternoon. He's in the California wine country, gathering information for the 20th anniversary issue of the Wine Advocate, the bimonthly newsletter that has made him the most powerful wine critic in the world--the most powerful critic of any kind, anywhere, a man whose writings and ratings have enormous impact in virtually every country where wine is made, bought or sold.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
You'd think it would have happened sooner, but wine critic Robert Parker has just released a mobile app that gives subscribers to eRobertParker.com access to thousands of Parker and company's tasting notes. Thirty-four years' worth, in fact. It's free, and there's a version for iPhones, Windows phones and Android devices. IPad and tablet apps will show up later this year. The searchable database encompasses more than 230,000 professional wine reviews from wine regions all over the world, with “approximately 4,000 new notes being added with each bimonthly issue....” You can search by vintage, by varietal, by producer and, what's all-important to Parker subscribers, by rating.  So, for all those wine buffs who wouldn't think of drinking a bottle that garnered fewer than 90 points, it's possible to filter out everything with inferior scores and render a search result that includes only wines with those sought-after high scores.  The wine's retail price will pop up too, and so will a feature called “Find It Online.”  At the moment, the iPhone App store has just two reviews for the app. The first declares the app “Awesome!
NEWS
October 5, 1986
Is the new producer of "Spenser: For Hire" hoping that viewers will tune out the series? To remove the character of Susan Silverman from the cast is insanity. Silverman's role in the books and series has been a vital part of author Robert Parker's theme. There was also great rapport between Barbara Stock, who played Silverman, and Robert Urich. Billie Helsey, Balboa
NEWS
December 19, 1993
Your article on cooking shows (TV Times, Nov. 28) completely missed the boat on Jeff Smith ("The Frugal Gourmet"). He is, by no means, a "geek." If there is anybody on the planet who's truly happy that people and cultures are different, it's Jeff Smith. His shows are celebrations, not cooking lessons. If the world was filled with cooks of his ability, but also with his attitude, we'd all be much better off. Robert Parker, Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1999
I was shocked, shocked, I tell you, to read the revelation about Robert Parker in David Shaw's Feb. 24 article. No, not the staggering number of wines Parker tastes annually; nor the report that some winemakers allegedly assemble special "Parker cuvees" for the famed critic to taste. Rather, I was horrified to read Shaw's description of Parker's meal at Pinot Blanc, when he apparently chose to wash down a plate of fresh oysters with a bottle of Harlan Estate. The world's leading wine critic paired a full-bodied Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon with oysters?
BUSINESS
February 11, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second time in less than a year, Hyundai Motor America Inc. has lost its top American official in what industry insiders say is an ongoing power struggle between the company's U.S. headquarters and corporate offices in South Korea. Robert Parker, Hyundai's senior vice president for sales and marketing, resigned abruptly Tuesday, just 11 months after taking the No. 2 post. Parker was not available for comment and Hyundai officials did not disclose the reason for his resignation.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | PAUL CIOTTI, Times Staff Writer
Why would a wealthy, successful mystery writer like Robert Parker put aside his highly profitable, widely acclaimed Spenser novels to finish a fragment of a work started by a lonely, sick and suicidal Raymond Chandler? Well, first, there's money: more than $1 million for three months' work on "The Poodle Springs Story," a representative of the Chandler estate says. Second, it's also the fulfillment of a dream, Parker says: "I grew up wanting to be Raymond Chandler, and now, in a sense, I am."
FOOD
March 23, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
How did Jeff Morgan morph from a nice Jewish boy from New York into a sax player and bandleader in sequined tuxedo, then into one of the leading wine journalists in the United States, and finally into a kosher wine maker in the Napa Valley? And one who makes not just any kosher wines but a Cabernet Sauvignon that garners big points and can easily hold its own against the big boys' Napa Valley Cabs? It's a long story filled with digressions. As a young musician, Morgan went to France to study flute, then got a job as sax player and eventually bandleader at the Grand Casinoin Monte Carlo, developing a love of food and wine.
NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
Lettie Teague at the Wall Street Journal reports this morning that the world's most followed wine critic is stepping down. Robert M. Parker Jr. will no longer be editor in chief of the Wine Advocate , an influential newsletter the former lawyer started in 1978, with a loan from his mom. A Bloomberg story by Edmund Lee reveals that the Wine Advocate has taken on three investors from Singapore. The new editor will be the Wine Advocate's Asian correspondent, Singapore-based Master of Wine Lisa Perrotti-Brown . The headquarters will remain in Maryland, where Parker lives, but the newsletter will open a second office in Singapore, the better to serve the expanding Asian market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Time
Robert Miles Parker, a free-spirited artist who sparked an architectural preservation movement in San Diego and translated the personalities of Los Angeles and New York into distinctive pen-and-ink drawings of their buildings, has died. He was 72. His partner, David Van Leer, said that the cause was unknown, but that Parker, who died April 17 at his home in New York City, had numerous health problems since being diagnosed with AIDS 20 years ago. Parker published three collections of his drawings, which include "Images of American Architecture" (1981)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Robert B. Parker, the best-selling author whose long-running "Spenser" private-eye novels updated the genre of hard-boiled detective fiction in the 1970s, has died. He was 77. Parker died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Cambridge, Mass., said his longtime literary agent, Helen Brann. "He was at his desk, working on a new book -- a new Spenser," Brann said. Once dubbed "the doyen of old-school, hard-boiled American pulp," the former English professor at Northeastern University in Boston wrote 60 novels -- 37 of them featuring his tough but literate private eye, Spenser, who debuted in "The Godwulf Manuscript" in 1973.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman
Robert B. Parker, who died Monday in his Cambridge, Mass., home at age 77, spent his final moments doing exactly what he'd done for almost four decades: sitting at his desk, working on his next novel. He didn't concern himself with looking back. Instead, he wrote, and in the process irrevocably altered American detective fiction, forging a link between classic depictions and more contemporary approaches to the form. Parker produced more than five dozen books in a variety of styles, including westerns, historical fiction, a marriage memoir and a nonfiction account of horse racing.
FOOD
October 15, 2008 | Patrick Comiskey, Special to The Times
ROBERT PARKER Jr., founder of the Wine Advocate magazine and indisputably the world's most influential wine critic, has published "Parker's Wine Buyer's Guide No. 7," the first of his series to be produced by a team of writers. Since 1978, largely unaccompanied, Parker has published the Wine Advocate, a journal of tasting notes and, most notably, scores, based on a 100-point scale -- the scale that revolutionized the wine world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1992
Services have been held for Dr. Robert Wheeler Parker, who was a family practitioner in Reseda for nearly 50 years. He was 86. Parker died Nov. 12 of heart failure, said Robert Merrill Parker of Valencia, his son. Parker, who was born in Shreveport, La., earned a bachelor's degree in geology from the University of Missouri and worked as a field geologist for the Arkansas-Louisiana Gas Co.
SPORTS
February 18, 1995
Ronald Patterson hit a 50-foot shot at the buzzer to give Grant High a 58-55 victory over Locke in a City 4-A first-round playoff game Friday night at Grant. Grant (17-7) also hit a three-pointer at the end of the third quarter when Donald Patterson threw in a desperation shot as time expired. Locke missed two shots in the closing seconds. Taj Rollins grabbed the rebound of the second miss and threw an outlet pass to Ronald Patterson, who hit his game-winning shot from midcourt.
BOOKS
July 10, 2005 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
In Stephen Frey's "The Chairman," 36-year-old Christian Gillette, a managing partner of a powerful Manhattan private equity firm, is elected chairman of Everest Capital after the firm's founder is found dead, probably murdered. Within a few pages, it looks as if Gillette is slated for a similar fate. Through 300 pages of narrow squeaks, hidden enemies lurk, waiting to strike and then to strike again.
FOOD
July 6, 2005 | Corie Brown, Times Staff Writer
For better or worse, Robert Parker Jr., a self-taught wine geek from the suburbs of Baltimore, Md., is the single most powerful individual in the buying and selling of fine wine throughout the world today. Parker turned a newsletter edited at his kitchen table, the bimonthly Wine Advocate, into a source of singular influence in an industry historically dominated by European aristocrats and old-money millionaires. The publication of Elin McCoy's "The Emperor of Wine: The Rise of Robert M.
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