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Robert Penn Warren

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October 18, 1998
Wind finds the northwest gap, fall comes. Today, under gray cloud-scud and over gray Wind-flicker of forest, in perfect formation, wild geese Head for a land of warm water, the boom, the lead pellet. Some crumple in air, fall. Some stagger, recover control, Then take the last glide for a far glint of water. None Knows what has happened. Now, today, watching How tirelessly V upon V arrows the season's logic, Do I know my own story? At least, they know When the hour comes for the great wind-beat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Scott Timberg
So many people are killed -- so graphically -- in some of his books that it's almost unimaginable. In his latest novel, it's after the end of the world, and besides wandering and waiting, almost nothing happens. He's renowned for his dialogue, but tends to ignore plot and doesn't use quotation marks. The author was so poor he couldn't afford toothpaste, but refused to do anything to promote his work. It's the biography of a starving artist, not a Hollywood player. But with this week's release of "The Road," Cormac McCarthy -- the reclusive author who told Oprah Winfrey that he didn't care if people read his books -- will be officially enshrined as one of Hollywood's hottest properties.
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NEWS
September 16, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Robert Penn Warren, the prolific master of American letters who wrote the scathing classic of political corruption, "All the King's Men," and decades later was honored as the nation's first poet laureate, died Friday at his summer home in Stratton, Vt. "Red" Warren, as his fellow poets knew him for the shock of red hair he had as a younger man, was 84.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2006 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
IF David Milch had his druthers, he probably wouldn't be strapped into a twin-prop plane at 10:30 on a Saturday morning, his aching back braced with a pillow as the aircraft scythes through the Central Valley haze. Milch, after all, has plenty of other claims on his time: projects to plan, Emmy Award-winning TV scripts to churn out.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
Robert Penn Warren, winner of three Pulitzer Prizes for fiction and poetry rooted in his native South and the nation's first poet laureate, died early today at his summer home. He was 84 and had been suffering from cancer. His wife, the author Eleanor Clark, told a family friend that Warren died in the middle of the night. A local doctor was with him, as well as Clark and their daughter, Rosanna. "He was one of the truly all-around men who made great contributions in all fields.
NEWS
April 21, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
It starts with a mumbling, a word muttered on a walk through the woods with the dog, a phrase that meanders across a blank-page mind. A poem may swell to the surface while swimming, perhaps. "Swimming is a wonderful way of writing," said Robert Penn Warren, the poet, white-haired now and sitting in the former onion barn he turned into a home 30 years ago. "Your body is totally occupied, there's nothing else and your mind goes blank."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990 | JEROME WEEKS
Maybe that is the only way you can tell a certain piece of knowledge is worth anything: It has cost some blood. --Robert Penn Warren in "All the King's Men" Adrian Hall may have lost two theaters recently, but with "Hope of the Heart" at the Mark Taper Forum, the director is back to some of his oldest tricks, refining his earliest obsessions for the stage. As usual, he's doing it on a grand scale with 17 actors, a complex script and a set by his longtime collaborator, Tony Award-winning designer Eugene Lee. One of the trailblazers of the resident theater movement, Hall announced his resignation in December 1988 after 25 years as head of the Trinity Repertory Theater in Providence, R.I., and then, in May of last year, found himself dismissed by the board of the Dallas Theater Center for his aversion to administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Providence, R.I.-based Trinity Repertory Company's production of the Robert Penn Warren play "All The King's Men" was videotaped for the New York Public Library's theater collection. "We think it is a very unusual and very brilliant production adapted from an important work by our first poet laureate," said project director Betty Corwin.
BOOKS
October 22, 2000
To the Editor: When Douglas Brinkley (Book Review, Oct. 8), identified in his contributor's note as a Professor of History, observes that Thomas Wolfe, rejecting the modernism of Joyce and Eliot, embraced instead "19th century Romanticism as exemplified in the works of Henry Fielding," (1707-1754); and then goes on to identify Robert Penn Warren as the one who "launched the Kenyon Review" (it was John Crowe Ransom who edited that journal from its inception until his retirement), readers must feel entitled to regard Professor Brinkley's casual judgments--"the forgettable Caroline Gordon," "the pious Tate," "the overrated Jack Kerouac"--with considerable reserve.
BOOKS
December 16, 2001 | GREIL MARCUS, Greil Marcus is the author of numerous books, including "The Old, Weird America: The World of Bob Dylan's Basement Tapes."
When "All the King's Men" was published in 1946, it won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. The 1949 movie version, directed by Robert Rossen, starring Broderick Crawford, won the Academy Award for best picture. In those days, everyone remembered Huey Long. Born in 1893, he was elected governor of Louisiana in 1928, running as a Populist against Standard Oil. He built roads, stadiums, hospitals, a new Capitol in Baton Rouge and the most dominant political machine America had ever seen.
BOOKS
October 22, 2000
To the Editor: When Douglas Brinkley (Book Review, Oct. 8), identified in his contributor's note as a Professor of History, observes that Thomas Wolfe, rejecting the modernism of Joyce and Eliot, embraced instead "19th century Romanticism as exemplified in the works of Henry Fielding," (1707-1754); and then goes on to identify Robert Penn Warren as the one who "launched the Kenyon Review" (it was John Crowe Ransom who edited that journal from its inception until his retirement), readers must feel entitled to regard Professor Brinkley's casual judgments--"the forgettable Caroline Gordon," "the pious Tate," "the overrated Jack Kerouac"--with considerable reserve.
BOOKS
October 18, 1998
Wind finds the northwest gap, fall comes. Today, under gray cloud-scud and over gray Wind-flicker of forest, in perfect formation, wild geese Head for a land of warm water, the boom, the lead pellet. Some crumple in air, fall. Some stagger, recover control, Then take the last glide for a far glint of water. None Knows what has happened. Now, today, watching How tirelessly V upon V arrows the season's logic, Do I know my own story? At least, they know When the hour comes for the great wind-beat.
BOOKS
October 18, 1998 | HAROLD BLOOM, Harold Bloom is author of numerous books, including "Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human," which will be published by Riverhead Books on Oct. 26. His essay will appear as the introduction to "The Collected Poems of Robert Penn Warren."
The publication of Robert Penn Warren's collected poems in an extraordinary volume, magnificently edited by John Burt, should establish the permanent place of Warren's poetry in America's literary achievement. From 1966 to 1986, Warren wrote much of the best poetry composed during those two decades in the United States. During the three years before he died on Sept. 15, 1989, Warren was too ill to continue his high quest for poetic sublimity.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Sometimes life has stupendous timing. If you were not lucky enough to see El Gran Circo Teatro de Chile's "La Negra Ester" during the L.A. Festival or if you haven't seen the inventive devices of Theatre Repere's "The Dragon's Trilogy" (still playing at UCLA), you may not be able to savor the coincidences between those shows and Adrian Hall's "Hope of the Heart" at the Mark Taper Forum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990 | JEROME WEEKS
Maybe that is the only way you can tell a certain piece of knowledge is worth anything: It has cost some blood. --Robert Penn Warren in "All the King's Men" Adrian Hall may have lost two theaters recently, but with "Hope of the Heart" at the Mark Taper Forum, the director is back to some of his oldest tricks, refining his earliest obsessions for the stage. As usual, he's doing it on a grand scale with 17 actors, a complex script and a set by his longtime collaborator, Tony Award-winning designer Eugene Lee. One of the trailblazers of the resident theater movement, Hall announced his resignation in December 1988 after 25 years as head of the Trinity Repertory Theater in Providence, R.I., and then, in May of last year, found himself dismissed by the board of the Dallas Theater Center for his aversion to administration.
BOOKS
May 11, 1986
I appreciated Richard Eder's take (Ex Libris, Book Review, March 9) on the U.S. poet laureateship. We deserve to be apologetic about it. Like the obscenity of "Poet's Corner" at St. John's the Divine, this is simply a further sanitizing of American poetry--yet another Establishment seal of approval. For years now, Robert Penn Warren, far past his poetic prime, has been stuccoed o'er with all the seals, medals and bay leaves it is possible for a nation hostile and indifferent to poetry to bestow on its safest writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Scott Timberg
So many people are killed -- so graphically -- in some of his books that it's almost unimaginable. In his latest novel, it's after the end of the world, and besides wandering and waiting, almost nothing happens. He's renowned for his dialogue, but tends to ignore plot and doesn't use quotation marks. The author was so poor he couldn't afford toothpaste, but refused to do anything to promote his work. It's the biography of a starving artist, not a Hollywood player. But with this week's release of "The Road," Cormac McCarthy -- the reclusive author who told Oprah Winfrey that he didn't care if people read his books -- will be officially enshrined as one of Hollywood's hottest properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
R evivals of Stephen Sondheim's "A Little Night Music," with Lee Remick , and Noel Coward's "The Vortex" will play the Doolittle Theatre next year, joining three previously reported shows--"Jerome Robbins' Broadway," "The Heidi Chronicles" and "Henceforward . . . "--to make up the Center Theatre Group's 1990-91 Ahmanson-at-the-Doolittle season.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1990 | Don Shirley
Taper subscribers have been told they will receive priority seating for the 23 performances of "The Dragons Trilogy" (" La Trilogie des Dragons ") at UCLA's Freud Theatre, Sept. 14-Oct. 14. The production covers a 25-year time span in Quebec City's Chinatown--hence the connection to the Pacific Rim theme of the Los Angeles Festival. It won first prize at the Theater of the Americas 1987 Festival and also won top awards from Canadian critics' circles.
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