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NEWS
August 1, 1996
Richard Kneeland, 68, a stage actor who for the last seven years had become a fixture in Southern California theater. Kneeland, who appeared frequently at San Diego's Old Globe Theatre and with the San Diego Repertory Theatre, won critical praise for such varied roles as Scrooge in "A Christmas Carol" and the slave Lucky in "Waiting for Godot." He earned a Drama-Log Critics Award as best supporting actor for his performance as Serabryakov in "Uncle Vanya."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Walter Sullivan, 82, an authority on Southern literature who taught 51 years at Vanderbilt University, died of cancer Tuesday at his home in Nashville, university officials announced. Sullivan studied the Fugitive and Agrarian literary movements, which used crafted writing to uphold the traditional values of the agrarian South. He became friends with some of the most prominent figures of the movements, including Robert Penn Warren and Peter Taylor.
NEWS
May 14, 1994
Cleanth Brooks, 87, literary critic and author who championed Southern writers. From 1935 until 1942, Brooks and the late poet Robert Penn Warren published "Southern Review," which was considered one of the nation's most distinguished literary journals. With it they provided an early forum for such Southern writers as Randall Jarrell, Eudora Welty and Katherine Anne Porter.
NEWS
April 27, 1986 | JERRY COHEN, Times Staff Writer
Broderick Crawford, who won an Academy Award as best actor of 1949 for his role as a ruthless, scheming Southern political boss in "All the King's Men" but was better-known to recent generations as the beefy chief of television's "Highway Patrol," died Saturday at Eisenhower Medical Center in Palm Springs. Crawford, 74, had suffered a series of strokes after one at a 1984 New Year's Eve party. He had been hospitalized at the medical center since earlier this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Sony's Columbia Pictures has shelved a planned December release of its highly anticipated remake of "All the King's Men," removing one of the studio's potential Oscar contenders. The release will likely be delayed about a year, said Michael Medavoy, chairman of Phoenix Films, which is producing the remake of the movie based on Robert Penn Warren's 1946 classic roman a clef about Louisiana politician Huey Long.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Helen Frankenthaler, considered by many to be the nation's preeminent woman artist, has been elected to the 50-member American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters along with four writers to fill the chairs of five "immortals" who have died in the past year, it was announced Thursday. Author William Styron, secretary of the honor society that is chartered by Congress, said Frankenthaler will occupy the chair formerly held by sculptor Isamu Noguchi.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992
Michele Willens' overview of notable political motion pictures and television shows, both past and upcoming, was most interesting and timely ("Jumping on the Bandwagon," Aug. 27). However, there are a number of seminal films she has failed to mention: "All the King's Men" (1949): Robert Rossen's brilliant adaptation and direction of Robert Penn Warren's novel received the 1949 Academy Award for best picture and Oscars for Broderick Crawford and Mercedes McCambridge. "The Great McGinty" (1940)
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | United Press International
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Richard Wilbur will be the nation's second poet laureate, succeeding Robert Penn Warren, the Library of Congress announced today. Wilbur, professor emeritus at Smith College in Massachusetts, won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award in 1956 for his third book of poetry, "Things of This World." In 1971, he was awarded the Bollingen Prize for Poetry.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, declaring that the arts are "reflections of freedom's light," presented seven artists and four arts patrons with the National Medal of Art on Thursday at a White House luncheon. "Our honorees are truly leaders in writing the history of American freedom," Reagan said. "The arts and humanities teach us who we are and who we can be. They are a foundation to reach out to other cultures." Singer Ella Fitzgerald, philanthropist Dr.
NEWS
June 18, 1987
Dr. Armand Hammer, 89, chairman of Occidental Petroleum Corp., suffered a broken rib when he slipped while getting out of a bathtub in his Los Angeles home, an Occidental executive said Wednesday. As a result, Hammer was forced to cancel a trip to Washington to receive a National Medal for the Arts from President and Mrs. Reagan. "He said he was going to come anyway," said Bill McSweeny, president of Occidental International in Washington, a unit of the Los Angeles-based firm.
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