Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Perdziola
IN THE NEWS

Robert Perdziola

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2008 | Karen Wada, Wada is a freelance writer.
The doublets are smashing and the gowns ever so elegant. But "The School of Night," which opens today at the Mark Taper Forum, is more than an Elizabethan fashion show. Robert Perdziola's costumes are as intricately crafted as Peter Whelan's 1992 drama about the political, sexual and criminal intrigues surrounding the death of Christopher Marlowe. "With this play you're never quite sure where it's going or who's to be trusted," the designer says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
November 7, 2002 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
"La Boheme" is regularly called the most popular of all operas, and it probably is, usurping the position held in the 20th century by Gounod's "Faust" and Bizet's "Carmen." The musical "Rent," based on Puccini's opera, has certainly broadened "Boheme's" appeal outside the opera sphere, and now the actual opera daringly heads to Broadway in a new Baz Luhrmann production.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The best-laid plans of mice and opera impresarios often get skewed. Take, for example, the unlikely pairing of Puccini's magnificently maudlin "Suor Angelica" and Leoncavallo's superbly sleazy "Pagliacci" in San Francisco. Several years ago, during his decline as general director, Terence McEwen decided that his company needed a double bill devoted to these distant verismo cousins. Although "Angelica" hadn't been performed locally since 1952, "Pagliacci" remained a repertory staple.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2008 | CHARLES McNULTY, THEATER CRITIC
Few life stories are as densely packed with intrigue as Christopher Marlowe's, the subject of Peter Whelan's 1992 drama, "The School of Night," which had its belated American premiere Sunday at the Mark Taper Forum.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In today's colossus-versus-gnat commercial theater arena, is there room for a deft, swift, good-dumb musical comedy, middleweight division? Or a musical comedy well within reach, at least, of those elusive virtues? These are the questions facing "Thoroughly Modern Millie," a freely adapted stage incarnation of the 1967 Julie Andrews film vehicle, which opened a Broadway-minded tryout Sunday at the La Jolla Playhouse. At present the show's about two-thirds satisfying.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER
Some things do change. Some things change even in the irrational, potentially lofty world of the lyric muse. The Santa Fe Opera, now celebrating its 33rd season, used to be an ambitious, struggling, quaintly modest all-American mirage. It was the private toy, and the dream-gone-public, of a stubbornly idealistic, sadly second-rate conductor named John Crosby.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|